Times when expletive words are needed

 
  Railnthusiast Chief Commissioner

Location: At the computer
Hi all,

A thread to share times when expletive words are needed when working on your model railways. Laughing

I will start the ball rolling;
This weekend I have been working in the shed (my precsssssious), now just to get every thing in context, I am normally well mannered, polite and very modest Razz but the shed for me is a very important retreat. MY retreat, where what comes out of my mouth is what happens.  If I say I am going to build a space ship, I build a space ship, if I swear, I swear, but normally the neighbours can't her the words being said though.

This weekend I have been a bit stingy on the $$$ and I have had a broken toaster which I had plans to build a new controller out of as my old one that lived in the shed broke. Anyways I started construction 10.00 today and inbetween times I have been painting some damaged buffer beams on two of my engines. This afternoon I had trouble getting the electronics to work on my new controller and so I was testing different wiring with my usual setup of some washers with the wires soldered on and the temporary screws holding the washers together. About half an hour ago I bumped an engine off the table, and in the proccess of trying to save it, the temporary connection touched the wrong terminal blowing up my last potentiometer!Bang Head All the small weights in my engine came out and spilled under the table and I had to crawl around under the table to collecrt them in the dark. That sucked.

I must admit my well mannered, polite person left me today as this incident occured and anyone would think I had chopped my hand off with a power saw. I used much colourful language then. Laughing

The only good thing about that incident is the fact that the train I knocked off the table was not one of the painted ones. I was an old daggy piece of rubbish train. As for the potentiometer, this gives me a good excuse to go out and buy a controller now. Very Happy

I must admit a half hour later has made the incident quite funny, and it's a win win situation. The pice of rubbish I created is no longer useful so I can buy something better and the train survived the fall on the concreate floor.

Here is my story. Make me feel better and tell one even worse please. LaughingLaughing

Railnthusiast

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  Albert Chief Commissioner

Not model related...

Bought a car

Crashed car 3 weeks later

Repaired car 6 weeks later

While finishing repairs the car slipped off the jack and crushed the oil sump of the engine requiring the removal of the engine.




  wrongroad Deputy Commissioner

Location: Grafton
A brand new CLP (well six weeks old)..... off the layout onto the floor Sad

As luck would have it, I was able to repair it with no visable reminders.

Seriously, there is not enough space or time to list everything. Very Happy

Regards and respect
  Foamer GEEWONG

Location: Geelong
Not model related...

Bought a car

Crashed car 3 weeks later

Repaired car 6 weeks later

While finishing repairs the car slipped off the jack and crushed the oil sump of the engine requiring the removal of the engine.



"Albert"


Oh that sucks.
Whilst having never done this (punctured a sump), being a mechanic, I share your pain.
  EFB5800 Chief Train Controller

Location: On my office roof.
I can relate to Albert's story-

Spent a weekend repacing the engine in the (now ex, but not cos of this) missus car with a rebuilt one. 2 weeks later she wiped the car out. Punctured the sump. Left it running till it seized. I couldn't even salvage my motor.

As to modelling nightmares-

-Finnished painting a BGB ABFX van. Took a photo. Picked it up, dropped it. Swept up the polyester fragments.
-Rebuilt a Walthers GP15 with all the trimmings such as Cannon cab. Dropped it on its nose. Wiped out the cab. It still sits in a cupboard waiting for rebuild again. 


And railfanning nightmares-

-Had a brand new camera with an expensive 300mm lens. Carried it in a 'snoot bag'. Didn't clip the bag shut properly, and it tipped the bag upside down, while I was climbing over a fence to get a phot. Snapped the lens in 2. I threw the useless snoot bag to where it belongs too.

- Had the video on the tripod on the nice pretty new footbridge at Wandong in a typical Wandong wind. It blew over. Smashed the camera and missed the shot of an El Zorro dogs breakfast of motive power.
  Railnthusiast Chief Commissioner

Location: At the computer

And railfanning nightmares-

-Had a brand new camera with an expensive 300mm lens. Carried it in a 'snoot bag'. Didn't clip the bag shut properly, and it tipped the bag upside down, while I was climbing over a fence to get a phot. Snapped the lens in 2. I threw the useless snoot bag to where it belongs too.

- Had the video on the tripod on the nice pretty new footbridge at Wandong in a typical Wandong wind. It blew over. Smashed the camera and missed the shot of an El Zorro dogs breakfast of motive power.
"EFB5800"


I have had a few moments, but not quite that bad.
  TrainTree Train Controller

Location: Eltham
I forgot to put the track in place across a door way a few years back and as my S class headed for the section I lept across the room, tripped, broke my wrist when I landed against the door frame.

I did not use any expletives at that point but I did when I got home from the hospital to find the loco suspended 1/3rd over the edge and not in a heap on the floor as expected. If I'd just stood there and done nothing the loco would still not have fallen.

Didn't know if I should be relieved or annoyed so I just swore.

TrainTree
http://members.ozemail.com.au/~abnel/railway/

  Railnthusiast Chief Commissioner

Location: At the computer
Good read train tree.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA

I forgot to put the track in place across a door way a few years back and as my S class headed for the section I lept across the room, tripped, broke my wrist when I landed against the door frame.

I did not use any expletives at that point but I did when I got home from the hospital to find the loco suspended 1/3rd over the edge and not in a heap on the floor as expected. If I'd just stood there and done nothing the loco would still not have fallen.

Didn't know if I should be relieved or annoyed so I just swore.

TrainTree
http://members.ozemail.com.au/~abnel/railway/


"TrainTree"


Did you get that into a letter in AMRM or something? If not, I think there is more than one person that's done that!
  TrainTree Train Controller

Location: Eltham
Hi

Yes that was my little note into AMRM.

Thought it was worth repeating..

Cheers

TrainTree
  1210_5910 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Over the Hills & far away...
Hi All - I have a few.....

One day I was soldering under my layout and I was in an awkward position with 2 wire's that were giving me the "you know whats". I had to hold them in a certain position and because the wire's were being stubborn I had to heap the solder on the iron. I knew that I'd put too much on the iron and that it would fall onto my thumb, but either way I made the sacrifice. It bloody hurt alot!! But the good news was that the wires held so I guess it was worth it.

Another one (and this has happened a few times) would be walking back into my shed (I do all my spray painting and airbrushing outside) with a completed model on a little spraying tray, only to have it either fall over onto it's side or fall off onto the concrete floor. No breakages yet (thank god), but the odd dint, and definately ruined paint job!!! Evil or Very Mad

Cheers

K 8)
  Railnthusiast Chief Commissioner

Location: At the computer
Three more for you all, the first one is this afternoons disaster.

Working on train tracks and it got dark so I used a lamp. I grabbed the lamp, dropped it, caught it by the globe and burnt my thumb.

A year or so ago I was at a mates place helping him out and I asked for an extension cord for the soldering iron. He coudn't be bothered, despite my telling him the wire was a trip hazard. Anyway he said, "just stretch the cord out, it reaches." and so I said "all right then, just be careful". You guessed it, my mate tripped over the cord, my instinct tried to catch the falling soldering iron and I caught it around the barrel and burnt the middle of my hand. 

Another time (not injuring myself this time) I was playing trains and trying to get my el cheapo Flying Scotsman up a hill and it couldn't handle it. I was using my DCC system full throttle and the engine got up the hill and started raidly speeding down the hill. The train was out of control as I accidentally bumped the wrong button and couldn't get it out of the wrong mode and the train sped into a siding, jumped over three (well, two and a half as there was a switch point) tracks, and held on it's center wheels teetering over the "abyss" held only to the tender by it's hard wire. Unfortunatley no matter how quietly and gently I tiptoed over our squeaky floor boards, the floor boards moved enough for the engine to plummet to the ground. It broke the buffer beam that accident. 
  4426 Chief Commissioner

Location: BUSY GOING AROUND IN CIRCLES
I think mine while not as good as those above was a time I was repairing/overhauling some Lima Motor's and had mentioned to a few friends I was doing this.

On the Friday after I purchased some parts I found myself with not only the 3 engines I had to do but my mates dropped off another 5.

So I got stuck into the mates ones first so I could get them done and dropped off, and they all ran a treat with the loco's being given a special adhesion treatment pulling more than they did before.

So here it is 5am Saturday and all the friends loco's are back with them and I go to make a start only to find that the spares I had for my loco's have been used in the mates loco's. Rolling Eyes

Thankfully a good modeller always has spares of the spares and a trip to my local model railway shop was in order on the Monday to restock, the shop owner was amazed I was back buying more on the Monday as I bought the last lot on the Friday. He just laughed when I told him why and ended up buying 10 extra packets of each part.

Little did I know the next weekend I had a few more to do, but I told the fella's to go get there own flipping parts. I think they had a bit of a Lima Parts boom that weekend. But try finding Lima spares today........not easy. Laughing
  Railnthusiast Chief Commissioner

Location: At the computer
I tried to get some Lima spares a while ago. I was told it is nearly impossible now.
  1210_5910 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Over the Hills & far away...
I think mine while not as good as those above was a time I was repairing/overhauling some Lima Motor's and had mentioned to a few friends I was doing this.

On the Friday after I purchased some parts I found myself with not only the 3 engines I had to do but my mates dropped off another 5.

So I got stuck into the mates ones first so I could get them done and dropped off, and they all ran a treat with the loco's being given a special adhesion treatment pulling more than they did before.

So here it is 5am Saturday and all the friends loco's are back with them and I go to make a start only to find that the spares I had for my loco's have been used in the mates loco's. Rolling Eyes

Thankfully a good modeller always has spares of the spares and a trip to my local model railway shop was in order on the Monday to restock, the shop owner was amazed I was back buying more on the Monday as I bought the last lot on the Friday. He just laughed when I told him why and ended up buying 10 extra packets of each part.

Little did I know the next weekend I had a few more to do, but I told the fella's to go get there own flipping parts. I think they had a bit of a Lima Parts boom that weekend. But try finding Lima spares today........not easy. Laughing
"4426"


Hi 4426

About that - where did you get your Lima part's from? I've got 2 38's, one that still goes strong and one that needs significant work on the motor to get it going again.

Thanks

K 8)
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
The posts here are all excellent examples of Murphy's Law at work.
  Grantham Minister for Railways

Location: I'm with stupid!
Assemble white metal tender with low melt solder. Decide to clean the flux off, pour hot water from kettle into a bowl, place tender into bowl, watch tender pop into individual parts...water hotter than melting temp of low melt solder...

[/insert extremely bad language here] 

I've embarrassed myself a few times with whitemetal. Wink

M
  Railnthusiast Chief Commissioner

Location: At the computer
I can't believe that big bearings and axles can be made of white metal. This just amazes me when comparing it to what it's like to solder.
  Grantham Minister for Railways

Location: I'm with stupid!
I can't believe that big bearings and axles can be made of white metal. This just amazes me when comparing it to what it's like to solder.
"Railnthusiast"


The wheelsets and bearings weren't whitemetal, but the rest was.

M
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
Almost had to use a few choice words today while using one of my surgeon's scalpels to pare of sme plastic to clear a set of bogies. Had just put a new blade in as well, when it slipped just missed cutting me by less than a hair, much bad language ensued and back to work I went. did this three times in one hour. I had to do it exactly the same way each time there was no other way to get the knife into the right position.

Well I finished all the work and did a stocktake of my fingers and they are all still there so I must have done something right. No cuts either which was unusual as well.  Shocked
  Railnthusiast Chief Commissioner

Location: At the computer
No cuts either which was unusual as well.  Shocked
"David Peters"

Geez you sound like me! Laughing
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
No cuts either which was unusual as well.  Shocked
"David Peters"

Geez you sound like me! Laughing
"Railnthusiast"


Yep great minds think alike. LaughingLaughing
  Heihachi_73 Chief Commissioner

Location: Terminating at Ringwood
I set up an older PC at the start of this year. After acquiring a spare case and getting the machine to power on with nothing installed (memory and graphics card only), I shut it off again, put a hard drive inside it, and bent a large capacitor which was conveniently placed next to the topmost hard drive bay (the capacitor was taller than the gap between the board and the drive bay). Somehow, the capacitor survived and/or the PC still worked afterwards.

With the same PC again, the CPU was getting a bit too hot for my liking (around 55°C in the BIOS), so I took the heatsink off to apply some new thermal paste. After putting the machine back together, Windows would take forever to start up, sometimes hanging before the desktop and/or giving a strange overheating error when rebooted (which I thought was due to the seemingly damaged capacitor). I eventually reset it, jumped to the BIOS and the CPU's temperature was sitting at 93°C! Took the PC apart again and discovered that the heat sink was snagged on its own plastic surround and was only just touching the CPU itself. After realigning the heat sink yet again, the BIOS ended up showing an average of 48°C. Somehow, the old 3GHz Pentium 4 CPU survived multiple 90-degree boot attempts over 2 days, and the PC still works to this day.
  TheMeddlingMonk Deputy Commissioner

Location: The Time Vortex near Melbourne, Australia
I set up an older PC at the start of this year. After acquiring a spare case and getting the machine to power on with nothing installed (memory and graphics card only), I shut it off again, put a hard drive inside it, and bent a large capacitor which was conveniently placed next to the topmost hard drive bay (the capacitor was taller than the gap between the board and the drive bay). Somehow, the capacitor survived and/or the PC still worked afterwards.

With the same PC again, the CPU was getting a bit too hot for my liking (around 55°C in the BIOS), so I took the heatsink off to apply some new thermal paste. After putting the machine back together, Windows would take forever to start up, sometimes hanging before the desktop and/or giving a strange overheating error when rebooted (which I thought was due to the seemingly damaged capacitor). I eventually reset it, jumped to the BIOS and the CPU's temperature was sitting at 93°C! Took the PC apart again and discovered that the heat sink was snagged on its own plastic surround and was only just touching the CPU itself. After realigning the heat sink yet again, the BIOS ended up showing an average of 48°C. Somehow, the old 3GHz Pentium 4 CPU survived multiple 90-degree boot attempts over 2 days, and the PC still works to this day.
"Heihachi_73"


Wow. I know they have some tolerance for high temps, but only for short periods... not extended running time!
  wolfpac Minister for Railways

Location: Over here...
Certainly impressive for it to keep running so hot! Surprised The P4 3ghz certainly run hot to begin with, let alone without the heatsink actually making contact or the fan doing anything. It *might* have been throttling itself to keep it from cooking itself? (Puts the temps into perspective on my i7, about half that P4, I just put an aftermarket Coolermaster 212 onto! Laughing )

And that's very annoying with there being a capacitor, or several, being in the way, I've had a few motherboards like that years ago. I've just either put the optical drive in the next bay down or the same with a hard drive. You do need some 'creative' ways of installing the drives.

Hopefully this is a general enough thread, however, a semi-expletive moment for me last night. Being WAY too tired and fiddling around in the BIOS on my freshly upgraded i7 rig, more or less killed my Win8 beta install on my spanking new Kingston HyperX SSD. Rage quit and went to bed, will look at again tonight after work...

Full day of absolutely blistering speeds, using as much of the 15GB of RAM in there as I could, pushing the 100mb download speed and download limit to the max, taxing the CPU/cooler etc. Basically trying to make the most of the new install as I could. The upgrades are more than up to the task, until I realised I still had the BIOS in "XP Mode" (32-bit, IDE mode, non-AHCI etc etc - one lot of settings is for my 1TB XP install, the other for the 64-bit Win8 beta). Booted back to Win8, no workie. Oh well, no great loss. I'll just kill it off and start again, thankfully the SSD is SUPER quick to install anything... More an inconvenience than anything.

Wolfpac

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