South Coast Line steam era Southport Tweed Heads

 
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
More fine tuning of station locations using merged topographical maps. Oxenford in particular is tricky due to Hope Island Rd being rearranged.

Oxenford railway station was near the junction of the southbound Pacific Highway and Hope Island Rd.  This area, including the Hope Island Rd intersection with the highway, has been completely rearranged since the removal of the railway and the building of the large multilane road bridge over the M1 Pacific Motorway.

Photos from 1964 show the railway bridge over the Pacific highway, then the railway station with the level crossing gates at the southern end of the station. [Arundell P.22/23] This also matches the 1954 Topographical map. The level crossing was for the road that led to Hope Island.

By back dating Google Earth to 2003, possible former racecourse ground formation indications suggest the race course site between the creek bend to the south and Hope Island Rd. The race course site is now occupied by a major shopping center. At one stage special mid-week race trains from Brisbane serviced this race course.

The Oxenford Station site was in the vicinity of [GPS] 27°53'6.41"S 153°18'58.01"E [UTM] 56 J 531114.11m E 6915483.90m N

http://i311.photobucket.com/albums/kk478/petanoz/All%20Coolangatta%20Tweed%20Line%20images/Oxenford-1954_zps84a942ec.jpg

[img]http://i311.photobucket.com/albums/kk478/petanoz/All%20Coolangatta%20Tweed%20Line%20images/Oxenford-1954_zps84a942ec.jpg[/img]

Bibliography; Arundell, Alan “The South Coast railway”, Water Street Productions, Brisbane, 2011 http://railshop.com.au/prod78.htm

Sponsored advertisement

  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
I have been examining the way the railway changed the transport systems through the South Coast. Pretty elementary stuff I know but I found a significant sign in a park in West Burleigh so I scanned my 1988 Bicentennial Pack Horse Mail Re-enactment envelope.

The earlier 19th century mail system through the South Coast region was pack horse then the later mail coaches. This envelope was posted at the historical Tallebudgera Post Office and carried by the 1988 Bicentennial Pack Horse Mail Re-enactment. It was stamped at Nerang on arrival as that was the post office in the early pack horse era. Tallebudgera was a mail receiving office from 1872 and a post office from 1878 till it closed 1958, according to the Gold Coast City Council sign outside the historical Tallebudgera building.

http://i311.photobucket.com/albums/kk478/petanoz/All%20Coolangatta%20Tweed%20Line%20images/Pack-horse-mail-envelope_zpsede4f6be.jpg

[img]http://i311.photobucket.com/albums/kk478/petanoz/All%20Coolangatta%20Tweed%20Line%20images/Pack-horse-mail-envelope_zpsede4f6be.jpg[/img]

The railway changed the way mail was handled in Tallebudgera valley as shown by the Martin Sheils memorial park in West Burleigh. Martin delivered mail and general supplies for the Tallebudgera valley 1922 to 1946. The sign notes he collected passengers, mail and grocery orders through the valley on his way to and from the West Burleigh Railway Station. The park near the former West Burleigh Railway Station site is named in his honour

http://i311.photobucket.com/albums/kk478/petanoz/All%20Coolangatta%20Tweed%20Line%20images/Martin-Sheils-Park_zps04ba8f0e.jpg

[img]http://i311.photobucket.com/albums/kk478/petanoz/All%20Coolangatta%20Tweed%20Line%20images/Martin-Sheils-Park_zps04ba8f0e.jpg[/img]

More on the Tallebudgera Valley, including the historic post office material I mentioned

http://www.yourbrisbanepastandpresent.com/2011/09/west-burleigh-and-tallebudgera.html
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Most of my image links were fixed recently and some images improved or added.  I also tidied up some of the text to reflect the benefit of more recent research. The image links were lost when I divided my photobucket images into separate libraries according to the topics.
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
I've seen a railway photo at Tweed Heads which shows a track near the water which doesn't seem to agree with maps I've seen of the line. Could this image be of the quarry line or did the South Coast line run closer to water at some stage?
GeoffreyHansen
Hi Geoffrey, I just dug this image out of the GCCC's Picture Gold Coast. Tweed Heads quarry tramway line Wharf Street and access route for Government Wharf road, Tweed Heads, c 1908. Also shown on SCL N-C s13 Tweed https://docs.google.com/folder/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwdFhWUmlkdUhyVE0/edit?pli=1&docId=0ByB-ppGeDyvwN1JfUFRCTDh2b1U  


[img]http://i311.photobucket.com/albums/kk478/petanoz/Tramways/Tweed-quarry-line_zps0b686bf5.jpg[/img]
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Those who would like to read more about Coolangatta’s history might try the 21 MB downloadable pdf from the heritage section of the Gold Coast City Council.   http://heritage.goldcoast.qld.gov.au/uploads/pdf/Coolangatta%20Urban%20Heritage-Charac%20Study%202000.pdf
  GeoffreyHansen Minister for Railways

Location: In a FAM sleeper
Hi Geoffrey, I just dug this image out of the GCCC's Picture Gold Coast. Tweed Heads quarry tramway line Wharf Street and access route for Government Wharf road, Tweed Heads, c 1908. Also shown on SCL N-C s13 Tweed https://docs.google.com/folder/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwdFhWUmlkdUhyVE0/edit?pli=1&docId=0ByB-ppGeDyvwN1JfUFRCTDh2b1U  


[img]http://i311.photobucket.com/albums/kk478/petanoz/Tramways/Tweed-quarry-line_zps0b686bf5.jpg[/img]
"petan"


Hi petan. I think that's the railway although the photo was taken from a different angle.
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Hi petan. I think that's the railway although the photo was taken from a different angle.
GeoffreyHansen
Hi Geoffrey, as you probably guessed, my recent posts with images of the quarry tramway from Point Danger and down Wharf Street Tweed Heads, were intended as an answer for your question. I assumed if you, who has shown yourself to be one of our more knowledgeable rail historians, was puzzled, than it would be safe to assume the casual Railpage reader would be more puzzled between the horse drawn quarry tramway and the completely separate QGR line that terminated in Enid Street.  


I have added more Tweed quarry tramway images at the tramway thread http://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11373445.htm


Folks who would like more of these Tweed Heads quarry tramway images can check the Gold Coast Council [GCCC] library’s historical section’s online image collection. This is called Picture Gold Coast and comes from the GCCC’s Local Studies Library at Southport https://gcccopac.sirsidynix.net.au/client/goldcoastlibraries
  Laidback Station Master

These are located near the old route at Molendinar, are they old track pieces?

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/93143542
  Laidback Station Master

Old meets new. This new light rail bridge being constructed over Smith Street also crosses the route of the old Southport railway at the same point.

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/93143961
  GeoffreyHansen Minister for Railways

Location: In a FAM sleeper
An interesting point laidback!

Are there any photos of the Southport railway crossing Smith Street?
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
A Tweed Heads 1895 map.

[Image caption; Tweed Heads c1895]

[color=#0000ff][size=3][font=Calibri]https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwUVdmSU5nSktBeHc/edit[/font][/size][/color]  

Note the inter-colonial customs office at the QLD end of Bay St. That customs office was still shown on the previously posted 1927 Tweed Railway plan.

Re the Smith St tram question;  The 1966 topographical map [two years after the line closed] does not show too much of Smith St in that Griffith University area. One of our more knowledgably members might have more help.
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Eastern side of Coolangatta in 1963 with rail landmarks highlighted.  Griffith St Coolangatta 1963 before street width expanded over railway land including the former stock yard area. Chalk St yet to be built on railway land..

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwNDNGLWZjeWRocFk/edit

[Can not get the Railpage image insert tool to work]
  Graham4405 Minister for Railways

Location: Dalby Qld
[Can not get the Railpage image insert tool to work]
petan
That is because the URL you have posted does not point directly to an image file with a .jpg extension.
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
That is because the URL you have posted does not point directly to an image file with a .jpg extension.
Graham4405
Thanks Graham for taking the time away from your holiday in the UK to investigate this for me!!

In that case I might just supply the URL link and those interested can still see the image by clicking the link.  I was curious as these images work on Facebook but not Railpage nor Wheels on Steel forums.
  GeoffreyHansen Minister for Railways

Location: In a FAM sleeper
Eastern side of Coolangatta in 1963 with rail landmarks highlighted.  Griffith St Coolangatta 1963 before street width expanded over railway land including the former stock yard area. Chalk St yet to be built on railway land..

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwNDNGLWZjeWRocFk/edit

[Can not get the Railpage image insert tool to work]
"petan"


The area around the stockyards and triangle are certainly very different today.

A bit of an off topic question but when was the Golden Gate bus terminal built?
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Found a bit more trivia. This shows [1] Coolangatta was the terminus in 1919 [2] image of Cooly stock yards. I think the image has appeared in some local history books.

For a time in 1919 the Coolangatta / Tweed Heads rail link was disrupted because of the worldwide influenza epidemic.  From 12:30 pm Wednesday 29 January 1919 the border between Queensland and New South Wales was closed by QLD to prevent the spread of the disease from the south. Everyone stranded on the wrong side of the border lived in large quarantine camps for the lengthy duration.

As no one was allowed to cross the border, passenger trains from Brisbane terminated in Coolangatta.  Media reports noted that since rail travellers could cross into NSW they left the train at Coolangatta and carried their luggage into NSW. Mail bags from the train also crossed southwards into NSW.  The cross border transfer of the southbound rail freight was achieved without any contact between rail employees.  [The Brisbane Courier Tuesday 4 February 1919 P.8]   http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/20268618

Only foodstuffs were allowed north provided no human contact was made in the transfer. Some ingenious means were used to achieve this food transfer including usage of the elevated wooden pedestrian trestles over the 20 foot wide stock proof state border cattle tick buffer zone. Milk was delivered by the customers placing their containers on the edge of the trestle for the milkman to fill once the customers had retreated a short distance.  [Longhurst, Robert. 1996. Chapter 8: The 1919 Influenza Epidemic] [The Brisbane Courier Saturday 1 February 1919 P.5] http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/20260242  

[Caption; The Coolangatta QR stock yards were opposite the Grande Hotel on Griffith St. The 1919 flu epidemic milk delivery system is seen in this image] https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwb2NhMzc2dnNFNTA/edit

Longhurst, Robert. “From Tallebudgera to the Tweed: an early history of the Southern Gold Coast” Gold Coast City Council, 1996. Chapter 8: The 1919 Influenza Epidemic.

EDITED 22/9/13 as the date I quoted earlier was wrong. The wrong date was in an online history.  The correct date is from The Brisbane Courier Saturday 1 February 1919  P.5   http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/20260242
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
EDITED the Coolangatta 1919 flu matter as the date I quoted earlier was wrong. The wrong date was in an online history.  The correct date is from The Brisbane Courier Saturday 1 February 1919  P.5   http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/20260242
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Found this in QLD State Archives. It relates to the reasons for the Tweed Heads station instead of Coolangatta terminus for the QR South Coast line.The reasons for the Tweed Heads station were outlined in a minute paper from Henry Deane, Engineer in Chief for NSW Railway Construction, 11 November 1902. This document, sourced from Queensland State Archives Item #299671 A/8937, is available for download as a 266 kb PDF.

https://skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=24F9DF60D435A2C2!114
or http://sdrv.ms/16VPA9k
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat RFR Line
Found this in QLD State Archives. It relates to the reasons for the Tweed Heads station instead of Coolangatta terminus for the QR South Coast line.The reasons for the Tweed Heads station were outlined in a minute paper from Henry Deane, Engineer in Chief for NSW Railway Construction, 11 November 1902. This document, sourced from Queensland State Archives Item #299671 A/8937, is available for download as a 266 kb PDF.

https://skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=24F9DF60D435A2C2!114
or http://sdrv.ms/16VPA9k
petan
Fascinating document... thanks for posting.

Mike.
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
I have written the following as a summary of the QR Tweed Heads aspect of the 1919 influenza epidemic.

The following gives an idea of how the Tweed Heads Coolangatta rail staff managed the traffic during the 1919 influenza epidemic. The first and main Coolangatta border closure event was from 12:30 pm Wednesday 29 January 1919.  The Brisbane Courier Saturday 1 February 1919 P.5   http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/20260242  

Travellers could cross into NSW as it was QLD that closed the border due to fear of the epidemic. Only foodstuffs were allowed north provided no human contact. Passengers to NSW left the train at Coolangatta and carried their luggage into NSW. Mail bags from the train also crossed southwards into NSW.  Source; The Brisbane Courier Tuesday 4 February 1919 P.8 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/20268618  

Tweed remained the freight terminus for southbound cross border transfer of the rail freight traffic which was achieved without any contact between rail employees. No northbound freight except food items for local distribution.  [Longhurst, Robert. 1996 P.138]

Coolangatta was the QR rail **passenger** terminus in this period and freight terminus for northbound freight from QLD sources only.

Border reopened Friday 23 May 1919. The Coolangatta quarantine camp time at Rainbow Bay, called Shark Bay in 1919, was a week if OK, then free to enter the rest of QLD as normal. The regulation influenza epidemic safeguard distance was 10 feet apart. This following article notes the wagons were shunted by the loco crew who would not leave the loco so remaining the regulation 10 feet apart from the shunters and others.   The Trove URLs gives the actual newspaper pages which shows other effects of the influenza epidemic on hospitals, schools etc around QLD including the Townsville quarantine camp for shipping arrivals with the influenza amongst passengers.

BORDER RAILWAY STAFF The Brisbane Courier Tuesday 13 May 1919 P.7 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/20363563
On Saturday the Railway Commissioner visited Coolangatta for the purpose of re-arranging the railway staff at the border. Standing the regulation 10 feet apart he had a conversation with the station master at Tweed Heads and subsequently arranged to withdraw six men from the Tweed Heads side.  Men on the Coolangatta side will shunt and push the wagons over the border and draw them back into Queensland. The engine drivers and fireman will not leave the engine.  The shunters will remain on the other side. Arrangements will be made for the six men who were withdrawn at Tweed Heads to undergo quarantine and return to Queensland.

…… The border was reopened the next week, Friday 23 May 1919, having been closed since 12:30 pm Wednesday 29 January 1919.
BORDER CONTROL The Brisbane Courier Saturday 24 May 1919 P.5 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/20365428

Practically the State quarantine restrictions have now gone by the board, having been replaced by the Federal quarantine arrangements, which come into operation on Monday. People leaving Sydney by rail have to get permits to travel, in accordance with the interstate quarantine regulations. These passengers can come into Queensland at Wallangarra in the ordinary way. If any of them should reach the border at Tweed Heads or other places they are allowed to pass on presenting the permits, but ordinary residents presumably can cross the border at will.

POLICE PATROL WITHDRAWN    The Brisbane Courier Saturday 24 May 1919 P.5 http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/20365428
The [influenza epidemic ] police patrols at Coolangatta and at other places along the border between New South Wales and Queensland are being withdrawn from yesterday. This should relieve large numbers of the force for duty elsewhere.

As no human contact was allowed across the border, some ingenious means to ensure the exchange of goods and services were devised. These mainly involved usage of the elevated wooden pedestrian trestles over the stock proof 10 meter wide cattle tick buffer zone, fenced both sides, which ran along the state border.  One bank conducted business by exchanging bank books and cash placed in a cigar box drawn back and forth across the border trestle by a string.  Milk was delivered by the customers placing their containers on the edge of the trestle for the milkman to fill once the customers had retreated a short distance

[Caption; The Coolangatta QGR stock yards, seen in this image, were opposite the Grande Hotel on Griffith St. The 1919 flu epidemic milk delivery system is seen in this image]https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwb2NhMzc2dnNFNTA/edit

The many side effects included QLD Education Dept being forced to inaugurate Coolangatta State School as the locals could no longer attend the Tweed Heads Public school in Stuart St.  


QLD was not the only state to block the borders over this influenza epidemic. NSW blocked its border with Victoria http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/15822653
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Some early South Coast Line station lists from Pughs Almanac on this Railpage thread  

http://www.railpage.com.au/f-p1874184.htm#1874184
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Recently found the Lower Coomera Cemetery. As it is marked on old maps along with the nearby rail route I researched the following short article.


North Coomera Pacific Highway railway bridge           Peter Cokley 2013


At North Coomera the Southport railway 1960s route from Pimpama crossed under a bridge that carried the Pacific Highway and the railway continued onto the western side of the highway to Coomera Station.  The highway bridge was located between the Lower Coomera Cemetery and Foxwell Road as shown on the 1954 map. As the cemetery still exists it is useful as a landmark on that 1954 map. [Marggraf P.206].


[Caption; Coomera Highway Bridge over railway, 1954]   https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwTUdmcDUyU0tJVXM/edit?usp=drive_web


The present day site is near the roundabout eastern side of the Foxwell Rd Pacific Motorway M1 overpass. As the cemetery is seen on Google Earth on the northern side of Foxwell Rd between the motorway and the roundabout, the highway bridge on the 1954 map would be slightly south east of the cemetery. Foxwell Rd has been realigned since the removal of the railway.


By 1963 a new overpass over the railway at Coomera was being planned slightly further south. Pile driving for the bridge and earthworks for the approaches had commenced. When the railway was closed the piles were cut off and the embankment lowered to just above the old rail level thus allowing for the four lane roadway to be extended through this area. Details of the proposed overbridge can be found at the QLD State Archives Item ID 821037 - Main Roads Job File 91-12A-18 [Robinson, Arthur via Railpage]


The cemetery has graves predating the train line but is not marked on the Working Plans and Section SCL B-N&S s8 Coomera North, although Foxwell Rd is. The cemetery is marked on the 1885 Parliamentary Papers, Extension of South Coast Railway, Page 11. David Bromage has provided copies of this 1885 document [size=3][font=Arial, sans-serif]http://goo.gl/AwMHbj[/font][/size]  


Details on the Lower Coomera Cemetery, off Foxwell Road, Coomera, can be found at the Australian Cemeteries Index website which has a detailed location map [size=3][font=Arial, sans-serif]http://austcemindex.com/cemetery.php?id=467[/font][/size]



There was earlier discussion about this area on Railpage; Queensland, “Seeking map of old South Coast Railway Alignment”  http://www.railpage.com.au/f-p1481667.htm#1481667


Bromage, David. “Extension of South Coast Railway, 1885 Parliamentary Papers”, [size=3][font=Arial, sans-serif]http://s825.photobucket.com/user/DavidBromage/library/Extension%20of%20South%20Coast%20Railway?sort=4&page=1[/font][/size]  or [size=3][font=Arial, sans-serif]http://goo.gl/AwMHbj[/font][/size]    Source; QRIG yahoogroup internet group, 14 October 2013, http://groups.yahoo.com/group/qrig/


Marggraf, Eric “Destination – Southport”, in “Sunshine Express”, ARHS-Q, 11-1998 P.206


Robinson, Arthur, via Railpage thread; Queensland, “Seeking map of old South Coast Railway Alignment” http://www.railpage.com.au/f-p1481667.htm#1481667


Working Plans and Section WPS SCL B-N&S s8 Coomera North https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwbkJlR0JYSzJabzQ/edit
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
QR South Coast Line [SCL] Station Plans 1891

Historical document produced by QR using the mathematical calculation and printing methodology of that era.

South Brisbane [Melbourne St], Gloucester Street, Park Road, Boggo Rd Junction

SCL 1891   SYP 1  https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwZlR1U2VtdUZxU2M/edit

South Brisbane [Stanley St Dry Dock], Woolloongabba, Albert, Fairfield, Yeronga, Tennyson

SCL 1891   SYP 2   https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwMGRtaUppY2VIWUE/edit

Yeerongpilly, Moorooka, Rocklea, Salisbury, Cooper's Plains, Sunnybank

SCL 1891   SYP 3 https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwdWxjeHZUZUp0VEE/edit

Runcorn, Kuraby, Kingston, Loganlea, Bethania Junction, Holmview

SCL 1891   SYP 4 https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwVDBrbXFma2oxcjQ/edit

Beenleigh, Stapylton, Ormeau, Pimpama, Coomera

SCL 1891   SYP 5 https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwdHJxcW9lRVM3V0k/edit

Oxenford, Helensvale, Ernest Junction, Southport, Molendinar, Nerang

SCL 1891   SYP 6 https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwNkpadzdZRk5mZDg/edit

Title page; QR South Coast Line [SCL] Grade Sections and Station Plans 1891

SCL 1891   SYP 6 https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwQzhJRWFTLUd0M00/edit


***********************************************************************************************

As you know, in the 1880s, the South Brisbane passenger terminus was near the Dry Dock in Stanley Street and the Melbourne Street terminus opened in December 1891. As Southport opened 1889, the early Southport trains were South Brisbane [Stanley Street Dry Dock], not Melbourne Street services. Nerang to Tweed distances post-date Melbourne Street.

1891 is pre the 1896 Fairfield deviations to Yeerongpilly which is shown without the Tennyson Moorooka fork line. Albert shown with connections to Cleveland. Boggo Rd Junction was later Dutton Park site. Annerley Rd shown as Boggo Rd.    

Beenleigh station 1891 looks similar to the c1954 aerial view https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwcnFGcmVBbnk0X28/edit?usp=drive_web

Mileage is shown in the format of miles:chains:links. Moorooka shows 4:73:09 which translates as 4 miles 73 chains and 09 links. There are 80 chains to a mile and 100 links in a chain. A standard cricket pitch is one chain long.  Easy conversions are possible using a calculator; 1 Mile = 1.61 Kilometres and 1 Kilometre = 0.62 Miles. One chain = 66 feet = 22 yards = 20.12 metres. 10 chains are 201.2 metres.

Mileage shown is generally “Milepost Mileage” which relates to the physical mile posts placed beside the tracks along the line with the zero point at South Brisbane. Some examples of “Plan Mileage” also are shown. This relates to the mileage for the plan of that specific route. The Southport platform shows “Plan Mileage” of 3M 58C 10L which is measured from Ernest Junction.

Fairfield, Yeronga and Tennyson show mileage from both Melbourne St terminus and Stanley St terminus.

Woolloongabba is shown on this official QR document spelt with two “LLs” but usually QR used only one “L” as seen on the c1960 Working Timetable for the Tweed Heads line https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwTlh4RlFMb2RadDg/edit

Any question about missing stations might be answered on this Railpage thread http://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11376090.htm
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
State Library QLD had a 1929/30 New England Motor Company's advertisement for bus travel Brisbane / Murwillumbah / Byron Bay / Lismore etc. As this was by road, it did not require changes between rail and road at Tweed Heads nor Murwillumbah or Southport and was not dependent on rail timetables. New England Motor Company was owned by George Robinson.

[Caption; New England Motor Company’s c1929/30 road coach service between Brisbane and Northern NSW without rail option] https://docs.google.com/file/d/0ByB-ppGeDyvwdU5HUW9hX0hqVTg/edit

The same bus advertisement also shows the steam ship connection between Sydney and Brisbane via the Byron Bay jetty and road north through Murwillumbah. The direct 1930 rail link to Brisbane via Kyogle meant passengers could do that Sydney trip without the ocean voyage. In the 1930s the same George Robinson, along with pilot Keith Virtue, also formed New England Airways for travel between Brisbane and Lismore as well as other centers. That company, through several mergers, was eventually absorbed as part of Ansett Airlines.

As many know the railways also had a timetable for the co-ordinated rail and road service between South Brisbane, Southport [rail to road] and Murwillumbah [road coach back to rail] which used the coastal highway south of Southport. This bus went via the popular tourist resorts of Surfers Paradise, Broadbeach and Burleigh Heads.

State Library QLD link to the 1912, 1921 and 1929/30 hotel directories blog site [size=2][font=Calibri, sans-serif]http://blogs.slq.qld.gov.au/jol/2014/01/09/where-to-stay-in-1912-queensland/[/font][/size]

If you do view those online remember you can save them by printing the fully downloaded item as a PDF and saving that PDF.

EDIT; I do realise there was a direct non ocean Sydney Brisbane option before 1930 via Wallangarra but the ocean option was clearly preferred by enough customers to ensure the ocean service operated.
  mb67 Junior Train Controller

PB15 747 at Tweed Heads

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