Auckland Electrification Thread

 
Topic moved from NZ and Oceania by bevans on 05 Feb 2015 19:39
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

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A state-of-the-art simulator has been set up to help those driving Auckland's new electric trains.
The first one is on its way from Spain, due here at the end of the month.
To practise - drivers sit in a customised virtual video game and get used to all the controls.
The simulator also throws a variety of weather conditions, day, night or other events on the railway line to test drivers.
There are 57 three-car train sets being manufactured in Spain, and all will be operating by mid-2015.

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  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

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Overhead Between Westfield and Penrose is going live this weekend.

At the time of reporting the first EMU is sailing past Rangitoto. I image that it will be taken direct to the Wiri depot on the tralers that it has been loaded onto for loading onto the ship.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Auckland’s first new train has arrived

Last reviewed: 26/08/2013 1:59 p.m.


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Media release: 26 August 2013

The first of Auckland’s new electric trains has arrived and has been delivered to Wiri Train Depot for certification.

The train landed in Auckland on Saturday after a five-week sea journey from Spain, via Baltimore and the Panama Canal.

After clearance from Customs, the three cars of the train were trucked 25 kilometres from the port of Auckland to Wiri early this morning.

The train will be certified at Wiri Train Depot before being officially unveiled in early September. The new train, and others as they arrive, will be thoroughly tested and used for driver training before going into operation, once there is a sufficient number to begin running a commercial service. This is planned to start in the second quarter of next year.

All of the 57 new trains will be in full service in 2015.

Auckland Transport’s chairman, Dr Lester Levy, says this first train has been delivered right on time.

“These trains will change the face of public transport in Auckland,” he says.

“Train services have improved significantly in recent years and these attractive new trains will provide an additional incentive for people to get on board,” he says.

The trains have been designed to meet the specific needs of Aucklanders and feature the latest in safety, comfort and reliability.

“Along with so many Aucklanders, we are looking forward to the first trains going into service next year. This is a very exciting time for Auckland,” Dr Levy says.

“We thank the people of Auckland for their patience as all the work and preparation is undertaken to get the trains here. Finally, the day has come for the first of our new fleet to land on New Zealand soil.”

Each three-car train can carry up to 375 passengers - around 100 more passengers than the current trains and once all 57 three-car trains are in service, they will provide for a 40 per cent increase in network capacity. The total cost of the fleet is NZ$420 million.

Watch the video from ONE News of the first of Auckland's new trains arriving in the city.

Auckland's new electric trains

  • Comfort: all trains will have airconditioning to ensure comfortable temperatures in Auckland’s variable weather conditions.  Double glazed windows. No doors between the gangway so passengers can see and move through the entire train. Ergonomically designed hand grabs.


  • Noise reduction: electric trains are far quieter than diesel locomotives, a major benefit for those living or working near the rail network.



  • Safety: an on board CCTV system comprising 16 cameras ensures the driver can see all around and inside the train and will automatically switch to the best camera if an alarm or door obstruction occurs.  Doors have obstacle detection. Emergency call points throughout enable passengers to communicate directly with train crew in the event of an emergency. Fire and smoke detection system.



  • Accessibility: colour contrasted interior and exterior to assist visually impaired, audio and video announcements, priority seating and belt restraints for wheelchairs (and bikes). The middle car will have level boarding access with an automatic ramp to assist with access and exit for mobility impaired passengers.



  • Construction: made from stainless steel, the trains meet the latest standards for bodyshell design and crashworthiness. Fire retardant materials ensure the trains are suitable for the City Rail Link. Door width 1400mm.



  • Power: the trains are powered by overhead 25kV supply; they also have regenerative braking that will produce energy to feed back into the 25kV supply when the trains are braking, allowing a recovery of up to 20% of the energy used.



  • Acceleration: twice as fast as existing trains; a third as fast as a jumbo jet on full thrust.

  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
The first of Auckland's 57 new electric trains has arrived. Photo / Sarah Ivey

Shrouded in bubble-wrap, the first of Auckland's 57 new electric trains has arrived from its Spanish factory, ready for testing to begin next month before starting work on the Onehunga-Britomart line in about April.
The train's three cars were trucked 25km from the waterfront early yesterday to Auckland Transport's new $100 million electric rail depot at Wiri.
The fleet is due to be delivered by mid-2015.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Video can be found here http://www.nzherald.co.nz/transport/news/video.cfm?c_id=97&gal_cid=97&gallery_id=137403
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Electrification safety awareness campaign launched A safety campaign was launched this week warning Aucklanders they won’t get a second chance if they get too close to the overhead wires that will power the city’s new electric trains.


The first of Auckland’s new electric trains have now arrived in Auckland. Over the coming months these will be tested around the network in preparation for commercial services beginning in 2014.


"The overhead wires are now live 24/7 and potentially deadly to anyone who may get too close or come into contact with them," says Murray Hood, General Manager, Project Management Office.


"As with ordinary power lines, the overhead power system on the rail network is built so that people doing ordinary things near them are perfectly safe — only reckless or mischievous behaviour poses a danger. The public must treat those lines as live and extremely dangerous at all times.


"Sadly experience both here in New Zealand and internationally shows that some people ignore all safety advice and take risks with serious and usually fatal results," says Murray.


The overhead wires that will power the trains carry 25000 volts, which is 100 times more powerful than that used in homes.


"You do not even need to touch these wires to be electrocuted — electricity this powerful can arc or jump across gaps so it is important to keep away and make sure anything you are carrying is also well clear," says Murray.


The advertising campaign has been developed by KiwiRail, Auckland Transport and Transdev. Its message is particularly aimed at the youth market. The campaign will make use of social media and this will also be supported by posters and billboards, newspaper, radio and magazine advertising.


There have been several incidents on the electrified section of the North Island Main Trunk railway line that runs between Hamilton and Palmerston North in recent years.


Invariably, these have all involved young men trespassing on the rail corridor and getting too close to the overhead wires. At best those that survived received serious burns.

In 2003, a young male trespasser died after climbing on top of a stationary train in a freight yard in Hamilton. And in 2007 another trespasser received serious burns again after trespassing in the same area.


Because of the high voltages carried by overhead wires new height restrictions have been introduced at the 31 level crossings on Auckland roads within the electrified area. However, most road users will not be affected by these new height restrictions, as most vehicles and loads will not exceed them.


Most level crossings will have a height restriction of five metres. However, 11 crossings will have a lower height restriction of 4.25 metres. Roadside signs will warn of the presence of wires and display the height restriction at each level crossing.



Motorists with loads exceeding the height restrictions will need to apply to KiwiRail for written permission to use a level crossing.


To prepare staff for the transition safety training has also been stepped up. Next week to prepare the teams for the transition, AC Awareness refresher courses will be held at the Westfield I & E Depot and the Onehunga Branch Line at May’s Road Crossing.


"In the northern region, electrical awareness training has been part of our programme for the last two years. We’ve delivered courses for our teams and contractors who work in and around the rail corridor. The refresher training is part of this on-going programme. We need to make sure that staff and contractors are right on top of the issues. The hazards of operating in an electrified environment are very real and there’s no room for complacency," says Training Manager, Nathan Dodd.



Key maintenance staff will also be put through their paces. "We’ll be making sure that the training for our key maintenance operators is absolutely up to speed. Switching and line isolations are key tasks and we will ensure that our teams are fully competent as we work towards getting the new maintenance arrangements up and running," says Manager Traction and Electrical Engineering, Allan Neilson.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Overhead rail wires are now live

Last reviewed: 9/09/2013 2:17 p.m.


Page Content


?[i]Media release: 9 September 2013[/i]

In preparation for the arrival of new electric trains, overhead wires on Auckland’s rail network are now live. They will be live 24/7 and are 100 times more powerful than your home power supply: carrying 25,000 volts.

KiwiRail, in partnership with AT and Transdev, is running a campaign to promote safety around overhead wires. The theme of this campaign is ‘no second chances’.

The main things to remember about overhead wires are:

[ul] [li]
Keep your distance. Power from overhead wires can jump, so you don’t even have to touch them;
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Be very careful when carrying tall items on rail platforms, e.g. fishing rods, window cleaning poles or helium balloons;
[/li] [li]
Be very careful at level crossings when carrying high loads;
[/li] [li]
Don’t mess around with overhead wires, as there are no second chances.
[/li][/ul]

[table] [tr] [td] [table] [tr] [td] [table] [tr] [td] [/td] [td] [justify]Watch the Live Wire safety video:[/justify][/td] [td][/td] [td] [/td][/tr][/table][/td][/tr] [tr] [td]

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More information about being safe around overhead wires can be found at [url=http://www.kiwirail.co.nz/projects/major-projects/auckland-rail-electrification/auckland-electrification-safety.html]www.kiwirail.co.nz[/url]
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Aucklanders warned to stay clear of overhead train wires 9 September 2013

A safety campaign has been launched this week warning Aucklanders they won’t get a second chance if they get too close to the overhead wires which will power the city’s new electric trains.



The first of Auckland’s new electric trains has now arrived in Auckland. Over the coming months these will be tested around the network in preparation for train services in 2014.
The overhead wires are now live 24/7 and potentially deadly to anyone who may get too close or come into contact with them, says KiwiRail Project Management Office General Manager Murray Hood.
“As with ordinary power lines, the overhead power system on the rail network is built so that people doing ordinary things near them are perfectly safe,” said Mr Hood.
“Only reckless or mischievous behaviour poses a danger.
“Sadly, experience both here in New Zealand and overseas shows that some people ignore all safety advice and take risks with serious and usually fatal results.”
The overhead wires that will power the trains carry 25,000 volts, which is 100 times more powerful than that used in homes.
“You do not even need to touch these wires to be electrocuted - electricity this powerful can arc or jump across gaps so it is important to keep away and make sure anything you are carrying is also well clear,” said Mr Hood.
“So it is critical that the public must treat these lines as live and extremely dangerous at all times.”
An awareness campaign to get this message out has been developed by KiwiRail, Auckland Transport and Transdev – the three organisations which deliver commuter rail services in Auckland. Launched this week the campaign includes billboard, radio and newspaper advertising as well as a video available on YouTube and Facebook. A link to the video can be found on the KiwiRail website – http://www.kiwirail.co.nz.
“Transdev is tremendously excited about this new era for Auckland rail but it’s vitally important that everyone who travels on or near the train tracks heeds these important warnings about electrified overhead wires,” said Transdev’s Electrification Programme Lead Mike Yeoman.
“You can help us share the safety message. We encourage parents to talk to their children about staying well clear of the overhead wires and taking care around trains and stations, the rail network is no place to play.”
There have been several incidents on the electrified section of the North Island Main Trunk railway line that runs between Hamilton and Palmerston North in recent years.
“Invariably, these have all involved young men trespassing on the rail corridor and getting too close to the overhead wires.  At best those that survived received serious burns,” said Mr Hood.
In 2003 a young male trespasser died after climbing on top of a stationary train in a freight yard in Hamilton.  And in 2007 another trespasser received serious burns, again after trespassing in the same area.
The wires have meant the introduction of height restrictions at the 31 level crossings on Auckland roads within the electrified area. However, most road users will not be affected by these height restrictions, as most vehicles and loads would not exceed them.
Most level crossings will have a height restriction of five metres, however 11 crossings will be lower at 4.25 metres. Roadside signs will warn of the presence of wires and display the height restriction at each level crossing.
Motorists with loads exceeding the height restrictions will need to apply to KiwiRail for written permission to use a level crossing.
ENDS
Media Contact: KiwiRail - Jenni Austin 021 961 495; Transdev - Brooke Donovan 021 413 071
More InformationSTAYING SAFE AROUND THE ELECTRIFIED RAIL NETWORK
  • Treat the overhead wires and the fittings that carry them as live and dangerous at all times.
  • Keep clear of the tracks – only cross at level crossings.
  • Don’t take shortcuts along or across the railway tracks.
  • Always use dedicated pedestrian footpaths to access railway stations.
  • If you have children, make sure they are aware of the dangers of the electrical wires. Make sure they know not to play or walk near the train tracks.
  • Keep all objects such as ladders, poles, kites etc, well away from the overhead wires.
INFORMATION FOR MOTORISTS AT LEVEL CROSSINGS
  • The overhead wires mean height restrictions are now in place at all level crossings in Auckland.
  • The safe height restriction is clearly signposted at each level crossing. It is set at 5 metres at most level crossings with 11 at 4.25 metres.
  • This restriction will not affect ordinary motorists or pedestrians.
  • All vehicles that are within the NZ Transport Agency’s dimension limits for height - 4.25 metres - can safely cross any level crossing within the Auckland electrified area.
  • Road users with loads in excess of the stated clearance at any of the 31 level crossings within the Auckland electrified area will need to obtain written permission from KiwiRail before using any of those crossings.
  • To obtain permission contact the KiwiRail Operations Support desk on 04 474 2323, visit http://www.kiwirail.co.nz or email crossingpermits@kiwirail.co.nz
  • Applicants need to allow at least five working days for the permit application to be processed.
  • KiwiRail advise all operators of over dimension vehicles and loads who cross the railways to have the Train Control Emergency number, 0800 808 400 easily accessible in their cabs at all times
  • To stay safe, users of level crossings must always obey all warning signs and alarms at level crossings.
  • They should not queue on a level crossing or begin to move across one unless they know their vehicle can completely clear it.
IF YOU LIVE NEXT TO THE RAIL TRACKS
  • Be aware of your distance from the wires if you are using machinery or doing any work at your boundary. Maintain a minimum distance of 4 metres at all times.
  • Always look up when moving tall objects such as ladders and poles near your boundary.
  • Be careful if water blasting at your boundary – direct the water downwards.
  • KiwiRail will carry out regular inspections of the network to check no vegetation is growing too close to the wires. If you have a tree on your property you want to trim and are worried it may come in contact with the wires, contact a professional arborist qualified to work around live lines.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Mayor Len Brown is confident that rail patronage will increase and bring work on the City Rail Link forward.
But figures show Auckland is not on track to meet that goal. A rise in city centre employment and annual rail use of 20 million trips would see construction start before 2020.
Auckland Transport forecasts only 13.8 million trips will be reached by 2015/16.
Mr Brown says the new rail network will boost patronage.
"I think the big change for rail will be the electrification of the rail route and basically we will have, on track, 58 trains operating on full commercial route within the next 12-odd months.
"I think that will be a massive change."
"Every year we'll change those patronage numbers depending on how we're going.
"We will just keep an eye on that.
"I think Auckland Transport is going through a culture shift, a major culture change, of really understanding what it is to not just put in place a public transport network but how you connect the people to it and talk to them about the changes in it and what's available, what's not and how you promote it.
"This is still an early part of the journey."
Mr Brown says he is positive about the growth of the public transport network as a whole.
Electric trains service 80 per cent of Auckland.
And Mr Brown says he is confident the North Shore will get light rail.
"It's just about when. It's all about timing."
The link will connect under Britomart, Albert, Vincent and Pitt streets, Karangahape Rd and the Central Motorway Junction to Symonds St before emerging above ground to join the western line near Eden Tce.
It would be built in two 3.5km-long twin tunnels up to 45 metres below the city.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
on September 10, 2013 in Australia and New Zealand An electrification safety awareness campaign has been launched to warn residents of Auckland in New Zealand’s North Island about the overhead wires that power the city’s new electric trains. Commercial service is to begin in 2014, but there will be plenty of test running, long before then. “As with ordinary power lines, the system on the rail network is built so that people doing ordinary things near them are perfectly safe — only reckless or mischievous behaviour poses a danger,” KiwiRail’s Murray Hood explains. “Sadly, experience both here in New Zealand and internationally shows that some people ignore all safety advice and take risks with serious and usually fatal results.” The new trains run on 25kV AC.“You do not even need to touch these wires to be electrocuted — electricity this powerful can arc or jump across gaps so it is important to keep away and make sure anything you are carrying is also well clear,” Murray points out. The advertising campaign, particularly aimed at the youth, makes use of social media, supported by posters and billboards, newspaper, radio and magazine advertising. Several incidents on the existing electrified section of the North Island main-line between Hamilton and Palmerston North in recent years have all involved young men trespassing on the rail corridor and getting too close to the overhead.. At best, those that survived were badly burned. • Adapted from KiwiRail’s newsletter The Express. - See more at: http://www.railwaysafrica.com/blog/2013/09/electrification-awareness-campaign/#sthash.DKGVCcUo.dpuf
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Auckland unveils electric train  
       




Last updated 17:16 12/09/2013










SEAN WILLIS/Fairfax NZ
The newest train to arrive in Auckland was officially unveiled today by Auckland Mayor Len Brown






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Auckland's first electric train, unveiled today, signals a new era in public transport for the city, its backers say.
The train, the first of 57 to be brought in to replace Auckland's ageing diesel fleet, was unveiled at a ceremony at the Wiri Depot this morning after arriving at the Ports of Auckland, from Spain, in August.
Auckland Transport chairman Lester Levy said the trains would be gradually introduced into passenger service on a line by line basis. It was expected all trains would be in service by the end of 2015.
Levy said the trains signified a "new era in public transport in Auckland".
"The trains have been designed specifically for Aucklander's needs and meet the latest in comfort, safety and technology. They will be very attractive for passengers with their fresh, modern decor."
The trains will seat 375 passengers, an increase of 40 per cent capacity on Auckland's current diesel trains, and open gangways will allow movement from one end of the train to the other.
Space had been made under seats to cater for luggage, strollers and guide dogs and wider doors meant that the passenger flow on and off the trains would be better, Levy said.
Wheelchair users and others who were mobility impaired would be able to use automatic ramps on the central carriage doors.
Levy said security and safety features included an on-board CCTV camera system which would operate continuously in all cars, providing images to the driver; emergency call points throughout the train and obstacle detection systems on each door.
The seat fabric had been designed by three local artists to represent the variety of cultures in Auckland.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
By 3 News online staff
The first of Auckland's new electric trains has been unveiled today after undergoing a month of certification and testing at Auckland Transport's new depot in Wiri.
Mayor Len Brown and his train-loving grandson Luca unveiled the train, which Mr Brown heralded as "the future of Auckland".
The 70m-long carriage arrived from Spain last month and is one of 57 three-car trains that will begin operating on the city's rail network from April next year.
Each train can carry up to 375 passengers, an increase of 40 percent on the current diesel fleet which will be gradually phased out as electrification of the network is completed.
Watch video of Len Brown unveiling and exploring the new train.
3 News


Read more: [color=#003399]http://www.3news.co.nz/Aucklands-first-electric-train-unveiled/tabid/423/articleID/312960/Default.aspx#ixzz2eh4zxiCo[/color]
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

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Passengers on Auckland's new electric trains - the first of which was unveiled yesterday - will enjoy the spaciousness of open carriages from one end to the other.
Passengers will be able to peer down an internal corridor running the full 72m length of each three-car train, except for when there is standing room only.
Auckland Mayor Len Brown and his 3-year-old grandson Luca Colgan raised the curtain on the first train, which will be electrified next week when switching gear to Auckland Transport's new $100 million depot at Wiri is turned on.
That was the signal for representatives of user groups such as the disabled and transport campaigners and other guests to swarm over the gleaming new train, which will carry up to 375 passengers between Onehunga and Britomart from April, an increase of 40 per cent over the old diesels.
The 56 new trains, which arrive from Spain in 2015 and cost $400 million, have almost twice the acceleration of the old fleet and have greater braking power linked to an emergency over-ride system.

Drivers will be able keep an eye on things via an array of CCTV cameras, four inside each carriage and 10 outside each train.
The middle car of each train will be lower than the others, so parents with children in strollers, cyclists or the disabled can board at platform level.
Each carriage has two doors on each side, 1.45m wide to allow fast boarding and maintain a 10-minute frequency between each train.
Auckland Transport chairman Lester Levy praised Spanish manufacturer Caf for delivering the first train on time, which he hoped would set the future operating standard for the rail network.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Major milestones reached on electrification project The last week has seen two significant milestones reached in the Auckland Electrification Project (AEP), with the testing and commissioning over the weekend of the 15 kilometre Westfield to Wiri section and the successful energisation and short circuit testing of the Wiri EMU Depot concluded on Tuesday night.


This is a major step towards the introduction of Auckland’s new EMU’s and allows Auckland Transport, Transdev and CAF to start dynamic testing of the first new EMU currently located at the Wiri depot, says AEP project director Nick French.


"We are still finalising the test results but every indication is that there are no issues that have been picked up as a result of the testing and these sections will be able to enter operations as scheduled later in September."


That will mean the EMU team can begin testing the new unit firstly inside the depot and then out on that section of the network. That will then extend to the Onehunga branch line, which was commissioned last year, and is expected to see the first commercial service by electrified trains in the first half of 2014.


"The completion of this section of the network has been due to the efforts of many people both within KiwiRail and from a number of different organisations including HILOR, AECOM, DC Signals, Eastbridge, Siemens, Fulton Hogan John Holland, Electrix, Downers EDI, Auckland Transport, Transdev, and OPUS, I would just like to congratulate the team and all of the people involved in delivering this critical work." Nick French says.


Traction infrastructure is already in place across large sections of the network, with the rest to be completed in the remaining months of this year and over the summer block of line in January.


During the first three months of 2014 the focus will then move to finishing works, testing and commissioning.


"Testing and tuning of the infrastructure will need to continue through until 2015 as it will need to have full length trains running beneath it frequently — this is after all brand new infrastructure," says Nick.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
NEW ZEALAND: The first of 57 three-car EMUs being built by CAF for the Auckland suburban network was unveiled by the city’s mayor Len Brown at the new Wiri depot on September 12. He was joined at the event by Transport Minister Gerry Brownlee, Auckland Transport Chairman Lester Levy and Terry Scott, Managing Director of local operating concessionaire Transdev Auckland.

The first train had arrived at the port of Auckland on August 24, and was taken to Wiri for testing and commissioning. Driver training is expected to start in October. The EMUs are to be introduced on a line by line basis from the second quarter of 2014, with all 57 due to be in passenger service by the end of 2015.

Levy said it was ‘a very proud day for Auckland Transport’ and its partners, including the New Zealand Transport Agency Auckland Council, KiwiRail and Transdev, along with CAF and Downer, which built the new depot at Wiri. Brownlee added that the unveiling of the first electric train was ‘an important milestone in the government’s NZ$1·6bn programme to provide a step change in the performance and capacity of Auckland’s rail network.’

Each air-conditioned unit will be able to carry 375 passengers, 40% more than the ageing DMUs that they are to replace. Wide doors and open gangways will facilitate passenger movement, and space is provided for wheelchairs, along with automatic ramps on the central vehicle to provide level boarding.
  • During the presentation, the mayor confirmed that he was hoping to fast-track the City Rail Link project, with construction starting in 2016, if he is re-elected. Running in twin-bore tunnels below the city centre, the 3·5 km line would connect the existing terminus at Britomart with the Western Line at Eden Terrace. The government, which is expected to contribute half of the NZ$2·86bn cost, does not envisage work starting until 2020. However, Brown predicted that ‘by 2021, unless we have the CRL, we will have gridlock. Auckland's bus network will have reached capacity, and speeds on city centre roads will have dropped to 7 km/h.’
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mm0CoqkTV_U&feature=player_embedded
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
THE Mayor of Auckland Mr Len Brown has officially unveiled the first emu for Auckland Transport, 57 of which were [color=#005bb2]ordered from CAF in October 2011[/color] as part of the $NZ 1.6bn ($US 1.3bn) upgrading and electrification of the city's suburban rail network.

The 25kV train was delivered to the port of Auckland on August 24 and transferred to the new purpose-built depot at Wiri, where it was unveiled to dignitaries and the media on September 12. The trains will be maintained by the manufacturer at Wiri until at least 2026.
Each three-car set accommodates up to 375 passengers, which according to Auckland Transport is a 40% increase over the capacity of the dmus and locomotive-hauled trains they will replace.
The trains will enter commercial service on a line-by-line basis, and the final set is due to be delivered in 2015.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
EMU unveiling KiwiRail staff recently took part in an event at Wiri Depot to mark the unveiling of Auckland’s first electric train. The occasion represented an important milestone in the Auckland Electrification Project and was an opportunity for those involved to walk through the train prior to testing and driver training next week.


Project Director Murray Hood said "This was an opportunity for all organisations involved to acknowledge their unique role in this major project and celebrate the collaboration that has landed us at this point."


The first train will be introduced for passenger travel once KiwiRail completes and commissions the electrified network in May next year. Auckland Transport and Transdev will then gradually test and introduce the new trains into passenger service on a line by line basis until all 57 electric trains are in service in 2015.


Each train will have room for 375 passengers, an increase of 40 per cent capacity on Auckland's current diesel trains.


"Staff can be proud of the significant contribution that KiwiRail is playing towards enabling a network that will accommodate these new trains," said Murray.
  GeoffreyHansen Minister for Railways

Location: In a FAM sleeper
So Auckland and Adelaide have their electric trains and the Gold Coast has its electric trams.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Wiri goes live The traction overhead from Westfield to Wiri and the EMU depot were successfully energised at 3:40pm Friday 20th September.


At 11.26am Saturday 21 September, the prototype CAF EMU took power from the overhead 25kV lines for the first time for test purposes. Auckland Transport’s EMU Project Director, Tom Salt, says "the initial tests they performed were a total success."


KiwiRail monitored the main line signalling system during the tests. "The on-board transformer current in-rush tests were monitored for any possible malfunction. We detected no irregularities and everything went smoothly. The Wiri to Westfield section of the Auckland metro network has now been permanently energised. We are currently analysing the in-rush tests to make sure they comply with KiwiRail specifications but we don’t expect any problems. This is a major milestone in the Auckland Electrification Project and I’d like to thank all those involved for a job well done," says Allan Neilson, Manager Traction & Electrical Engineering.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
First test run of new EMU



http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=484_FfGGBZg
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

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Wiri to Newmarket permanently energised
The line from the Wiri EMU Depot to Newmarket Station was permanently energised on Monday.


The energisation took place Monday afternoon so that train testing could be done between late Monday evening and early Tuesday morning. Testing of the new EMUs can now take place on a continuing basis.


On the night of the test, Express’s photographer/agent, Michael Kilgour, made sure he was there to snap some brilliant photos. Thanks Michael and keep the good stuff coming.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Auckland’s second new train begins testing

Last reviewed: 20/11/2013 12:55 p.m.


Page Content


Media release: 20 November 2013

The second of 57 three-car electric trains has arrived in Auckland and is now undergoing extensive testing at the purpose-built Wiri Depot.

After a sea journey from the manufacturing plant in Spain, the new electric train has commenced the standard testing and commissioning programme ahead of it going into service in the second quarter of 2014.

Lloyd Major, Project Director for Auckland Transport’s Electric Train programme says excellent progress is being made towards ensuring that the new trains meet all necessary commissioning and safety requirements.

“We have already put the first electric train through an extremely rigorous series of tests to establish a benchmark for all future trains and I’m pleased to report that these new trains are world class in terms of the technology and benefits for passengers.  

“A significant amount of work went into the design of the trains to ensure that they were not only world class, but specifically designed to meet the needs of Aucklanders and our unique weather and terrain. We’ve been excited by the first train’s performance and are now putting the second train through its paces,” he says.

“Passengers are going to be very pleasantly surprised at how comfortable and enjoyable the new trains are.”

Two trains are scheduled to arrive each month between now and November 2014. Thereafter, four trains will arrive monthly until all 57 have been delivered by July 2015. Each train will undergo around a month of testing and commissioning and will be used for driver training.

As part of the testing programme, the new electric trains will run on the Auckland rail network at night, during weekend shutdowns and over the summer holiday period. People are advised to take extra care around the rail network as the new trains can accelerate quickly and are very quiet.

The first electric train passenger service is expected to commence on the Onehunga line in the second quarter of 2014.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Auckland Transport expects new fleet will run every 10 minutes and carry 40 per cent more passengers
Driver William Els tries out the console of the new electric trains. Photo / Richard Robinson
Ninety years after Auckland's leaders began hankering after electric trains in 1923, the city is poised to join the world of modern rail transport.
The first of a 57-strong fleet of electric trains has been undergoing closed-track trials at nights and weekends on the city's southern line, ready to start whisking passengers between Onehunga and Britomart by the end of April, at greater speed and comfort.
[img]http://media.nzherald.co.nz/webcontent/image/jpg/201341/new_train_460x230.jpeg[/img]Video
Trials are also progressing on a second train, and the pioneering pair will be joined soon on the tracks by a third, which arrived at Auckland Transport's new $100 million Wiri depot from its Spanish factory last week, ready for unpacking and initial checks.
That has enabled the council transport body to confirm an expectation that all the new trains will be running on all railway lines between Papakura, Swanson and Britomart by July 24, 2015, at 10-minute frequencies except for on the single-tracked Onehunga branch, which will host half-hour services.

Project director Lloyd Mayor says the first arrival from Spain has already performed superbly in extremely rigorous tests - to a top speed of 122.6km/h - to establish a benchmark for all its successors "and I'm pleased to report that these new trains are world-class in terms of the technology and benefits for passengers".
"Passengers are going to be very pleasantly surprised at how comfortable and enjoyable the new trains are."
The three-car trains will each carry up to 375 passengers - 40 per cent more than the existing diesel sets - and can be coupled up to move 750 commuters at a time.
Their cruising speed of about 90km/h, aided by faster although non-juddering acceleration and braking in and out of stations, is expected to shave 10 minutes off existing 53-minute trips between Papakura and Britomart.
Costs of maintenance and fuel, supplied by Transpower from two track-side substations and equating to an extra 1 per cent of Auckland's electricity demand, will be less than half those of the existing diesel fleet.
Quieter and emissions-free running will spur more intensive urban development around railway stations, and allow the trains to travel 3.5km underground at a steep grade through the city's proposed new $2.86 billion rail link from Britomart to Mt Eden.
The onus has been on the first train to prove the effectiveness of not just its own features, but also its interface with KiwiRail's $500 million track electrification and signalling upgrade.
That has included running video cameras on the roof to ensure electricity is flowing at the correct rate through connections with overhead power lines without sparks flying.
At the lower end of the technology curve, it has also included some No-8-wire ingenuity in the form of temporary polystyrene spacers protruding from each door to check platform clearances.
After years of delays in getting the $1.14 billion electrification project to the start line - past a change of Government in 2008 which sent funding arrangements back to the drawing board - trains are expected to keep arriving at a rate of two a month before deliveries double from the end of 2014.
KiwiRail has largely completed its share of the project, which has not only involved erecting 3500 masts to string overhead lines carrying 25,000 volts of electricity across 80km of railway tracks, but has also included a $90 million effort since 2009 to replace all points machines and signals with a computerised system capable of overriding drivers to cut power to any trains heading too fast towards red "stop" lights.
Infrastructure and engineering general manager Rick van Barneveld says the first electric unit's high-speed performance under new wires has been completed "without any issues".
"This is very encouraging for a new train and new infrastructure being introduced at the same time."
The rollout should come as a huge relief to commuters enduring bone-shaking diesel hand-me-down trains bought from Perth after the West Australian capital went electric in 1991, spurring a major increase in rail patronage from eight million passenger trips a year to more than 60 million.
It can't come soon enough for Auckland Transport, which was heading towards 11 million passenger rail trips in 2011 before dipping below 10 million last year.
Although patronage has since recovered slightly to 10.3 million annual trips, Auckland still has a long way to go to meet a challenge from Prime Minister John Key to demonstrate an ability to reach 20 million by 2020 if the Government is to pay for half of the underground rail link before then.
Auckland's new trains are arriving 75 years after Wellington began receiving the first of three generations of electric trains in 1938.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
The first of a planned fleet of 57 electric trains will be phased into service from April. Photo / Dean PurcellIt was hard to believe we were whooshing through South Auckland at 112km/h between high-speed braking trials on the first electric train.
After a gentle and barely notice able start, unannounced by the din or lurching of a classic diesel take-off, it felt as though the big, bright new conveyance was just warming up, with plenty more grunt in reserve from its 25,000-volt overhead power supply.
But the giddy rate at which landscape receded behind our stealth machine confirmed the speedometer in our otherwise deactivated rear driving cab could not have been lying, and we had taken a quantum leap ahead of rail travel as previously known in Auckland.
The train felt as stable as a wide-bodied jumbo jet flying through clear air, with none of the body-jarring motion or clickety-clack of the diesel sets it - and 56 more three-car electric sets - will replace.

Even during emergency braking drills between Otahuhu and Puhinui on a weekend when scheduled passenger services were suspended to help KiwiRail towards completion of its part in the $1.14 billion electrification project, we were easily able to stay standing in a wide aisle running the full 72m length of the new train, although strap hangers provided an added guarantee of stability.
Wide windows gave a great sense of spaciousness, although the train has yet to be load-tested with sandbags to simulate its 375-passenger capacity.
Comfortable seats, their blue and black fabric designed by Auckland artists, were covered by heavy plastic to keep them in mint condition for the first fare-paying passengers and we were told to be careful not to trip over temporary wires running to testing stations set up through the train to monitor its performance.
The main drama was when representatives of Spanish train-maker and maintenance contractor CAF dumped a water solution containing 50 litres of dishwashing liquid onto the tracks below us, to test the brakes on slippery surfaces, before bringing the train to an easy emergency stop from 110km/h in little more than 450m. That compares with 750m in which existing locomotive-hauled passenger trains require to stop from 100km/h, and 885m for freight trains from 80km/h.
As for acceleration, the new train takes just 57 seconds to hit 110km/h, little more than about 100 seconds needed by a diesel locomotive train to reach 80km/h, about its top speed.
Each of the three cars has emergency buttons, where passengers can talk through an intercom and be seen by the train driver through CCTV cameras.
Another important feature is a split-level middle car, allowing passengers with disabilities, pushchairs or bikes to board at platform level, and Auckland Transport is negotiating for Wi-Fi services for passengers.
[img]http://media.nzherald.co.nz/webcontent/image/jpg/201341/new_train_460x230.jpeg[/img]

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