Query re Dual Gauge Operations

 
  Hendo Deputy Commissioner

Railpagers,

I have a query about different gauged trains operating on a single track dual gauge branch line which terminates in two dual gauge sidings with a dual gauge run around loop. For background, the standard gauge trains are captive to the line, whilst the narrow gauge can crossover to narrow gauge track at some points along the route and have a number of sidings of their own at the terminus.

My query is what are the protocols, limitations and restrictions for operating standard gauge on the line. It would seem to me that if a standard gauge train breaks down on the line it limits most traffic and the operating authority would try to limit the frequency and access for standard gauge trains to the branch line. It also seems somewhat bizarre that both gauges share the same sidings, which would again limit the total number of trains that can access the terminal.


Cheers,
Hendo

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  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Maybe check Wallangarra for suggestions or if known, Acacia Ridge or the similar concept 3ft6in and 2ft at the Nth QLD sugar mill?
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
It also seems somewhat bizarre that both gauges share the same sidings, which would again limit the total number of trains that can access the terminal.
Hendo

If all tracks and sidings are dual gauge, then it doesn't matter which way the points are set for any train.

If some sidings off a dual gauge track are single-gauge (SG or NG) then shunters have to take care NOT to set say a SG train onto a NG siding, otherwise a derailment will occur.

This was a big problem in the 19th and 20th centuries, that poo-pooed all dual gauge ideas.

This problem is less of a problem with electrically operated points and signalled.
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
This problem is less of a problem with electrically operated points and signalled.
awsgc24

In WA, what happens where a DG line ends in a branch between SG and NG.

The signals and points are all electrically operated and the lines are track-circuited.

The signaller can set the route for either gauge.

If a train of the wrong gauge for the setting of the points approaches, then this fact is detected - somehow - a sufficient distance away for the junction signal to be put to red, the approach signal put to yellow, and the wrong gauge train to come to a safe standstill.

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