Lloyd Street Underpass/Grade Separation - Midland

 
  Cro_Pavo Junior Train Controller

Location: Midland
Sometime in early 2014, work will commence on the construction of the Lloyd Street Underpass in Midland.

Looks like the road will be sunk to create an underpass for vehicles that will provide better access to the new St John of God Midland Public & Private Hospitals especially emergency vehicles without having to wait at a level crossing.  The Interstate/Freight Railway Line will travel over the top of the new underpass.

First time in a long time in Perth that an underpass in this calibre will be built.. I have a feeling the height of freight trains might have had an influence in the decision to go with the underpass rather than a standard bridge over the railway line.

Could be in for some delays/temporary closures of the line during construction.

More info including the plan can be found on the Main Roads WA website:
https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/BuildingRoads/Projects/UrbanProjects/Pages/LloydStreetRailCorridor.aspx#.UqhM8tI0uSo

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  JNSymes Junior Train Controller



I have a feeling the height of freight trains might have had an influence in the decision to go with the underpass rather than a standard bridge over the railway line.
Cro_Pavo
Surely building a bridge a la Abernethy rd  would be a fair bit cheaper than Tunneling yes?
  Bulbous Assistant Commissioner

Surely building a bridge a la Abernethy rd  would be a fair bit cheaper than Tunneling yes?
JNSymes
By the time you add in the approach ramps to the bridge to allow the minimum 7.2m clearance for the SG lines, as well as the minimum 7.2m clearance applied to the extension of the NG suburban lines (to allow for the overhead lines), you would be raising the intersection of Lloyd Street and Clayton Street, and would be knocking off all the businesses and intersections between Great Eastern Highway and the rail line.

Far easier to allow for the 4.3m clearance for road vehicles and shorter approach ramps to the underpass, especially as the rail level is at least a metre above the northern level of Lloyd Street already.
  Cro_Pavo Junior Train Controller

Location: Midland
There has been a push from the Swan Chamber of Commerce for the State Government to open a temporary rail crossing over Cale Street (near the old Midland Junction Railway Station site) to the southern side while the Lloyd Street Underpass is under construction.

Lloyd Street between Great Eastern Highway and Clayton Street is expected to be closed to vehicle traffic for several durations during underpass construction.

Robinson Road crossing in Bellevue and Helena Street crossing in Midland are expected to carry more vehicles.
  Cro_Pavo Junior Train Controller

Location: Midland
Looks like work is about to begin on this..

McConnell Dowell have won the contract for the project. Work has commenced to demolish the properties purchased that are in the way of the project.

Brookfield Rail have reportedly agreed to 3 x 18 hour shutdowns of the line during the project construction.

This project includes construction of two rail bridges to cater for the freight rail lines. A third bridge is proposed to allow Cowie Close traffic to flow over the underpass and provide secondary access to the hospital.
  Kafoopsy Chief Commissioner

Location: Perth, WA
It would be nice if they modified the Lloyd Street / Clayton Street intersection so that Clayton St from the east bends around and becomes Lloyd Street.  Most traffic goes that way anyway.
  Bulbous Assistant Commissioner

Pretty sure that the two bridges allocated to the rail lines will both be double track, with the southern bridge to be the dual track, dual gauge freight line, and the northenr bridge to be the lead for the South Spur sidings at the old wheatbin for now. In the future, the northern bridge will be for the dual track, narrow gauge lines for the Midland line extension to the east of the new station. This lines up with the information given during the tendering for the Roe-GEH interchange that the northern spans would be over a dual track, narrow gauge electrified railway, with construction to allow for this future line.
  Cro_Pavo Junior Train Controller

Location: Midland
It would be nice if they modified the Lloyd Street / Clayton Street intersection so that Clayton St from the east bends around and becomes Lloyd Street. Most traffic goes that way anyway.
Kafoopsy

Just like the old days when the old road (Cowie Place now) which runs behind Harvey Norman was the main drag and curved around to join up with the rest of Clayton Street.  It's a bit of pain at the moment at the traffic lights especially with most people turning left.

They made the Lloyd and Clayton Street intersection with intention of extending Lloyd Street from Clayton Street through to Abernethy Road/Great Eastern Hwy Bypass Intersection.  Opened up land opportunities as well.
  Cro_Pavo Junior Train Controller

Location: Midland
Pretty sure that the two bridges allocated to the rail lines will both be double track, with the southern bridge to be the dual track, dual gauge freight line, and the northenr bridge to be the lead for the South Spur sidings at the old wheatbin for now. In the future, the northern bridge will be for the dual track, narrow gauge lines for the Midland line extension to the east of the new station. This lines up with the information given during the tendering for the Roe-GEH interchange that the northern spans would be over a dual track, narrow gauge electrified railway, with construction to allow for this future line.
Bulbous

The plan of the project is on the second page of this PDF link.

https://www.mainroads.wa.gov.au/Documents/Lloyd%20Street%20Grade%20Separation%20Newsletter%20-%20June%202014.RCN-D14%5E23307324.PDF
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney

Far easier to allow for the 4.3m clearance for road vehicles and shorter approach ramps to the underpass, especially as the rail level is at least a metre above the northern level of Lloyd Street already.
Bulbous


4.3m is surely too low; it is less than the 4.4m of Sydney's Harbour Tunnel which has frequent problems with too tall trucking, including interstate trucks from WA.
  Kafoopsy Chief Commissioner

Location: Perth, WA
By the time you add in the approach ramps to the bridge to allow the minimum 7.2m clearance for the SG lines, as well as the minimum 7.2m clearance applied to the extension of the NG suburban lines (to allow for the overhead lines), you would be raising the intersection of Lloyd Street and Clayton Street, and would be knocking off all the businesses and intersections between Great Eastern Highway and the rail line.

Far easier to allow for the 4.3m clearance for road vehicles and shorter approach ramps to the underpass, especially as the rail level is at least a metre above the northern level of Lloyd Street already.
Bulbous

Why can't they just use steeper approach ramps?  Is there some limit on how steep they can be?
  hello Station Master

Not about the underpass, mite about Bellevue yard. I've seen some of the spirit ov the west carriages have been crushed up? Any idea y?
  Radzaarty Junior Train Controller

Not about the underpass, mite about Bellevue yard. I've seen some of the spirit ov the west carriages have been crushed up? Any idea y?
hello

Only AFB 137 (may be wrong here) was scrapped as it was accidentally partially scrapped then deemed too far gone to save.
  Bulbous Assistant Commissioner

Why can't they just use steeper approach ramps? Is there some limit on how steep they can be?
Kafoopsy

Yes - same limiting gradient on the approaches will allow for a shorter approach ramp on a road underpass due to the lower vertical clearance required for road vehicles underneath the rail line.

Thanks for the plan Cro-Pavo, seen them through work a few times now already.
  Wallip Chief Commissioner

Location: Perth
Just curious.
There was talk a while ago about deviating the freight line out of Midland. How likely is that proposal, as opposed to any serious time line for extending the PTA tracks to Belview.?
My thinking being just build one bridge for freight now, then use it for PTA when the freight line is diverted. The entrance to Flashbutt could easily br moved to the east of the new bridge.
  Cro_Pavo Junior Train Controller

Location: Midland
Lloyd Street Rail Crossing has now been closed and will not reopen now until October 2015 once the underpass is completed.

Here is the construction animation of the Underpass thanks to Main Roads WA


http://youtu.be/ZCQ-Sp7c504
  Kafoopsy Chief Commissioner

Location: Perth, WA
By the looks of the animation in that video, Lloyd street will be open via a side temporary road during most of the construction.
  Bulbous Assistant Commissioner

The animation shows the single southbound lane being open, but the crossing is fully closed currently. Machines for digging the slurry walls are in there already.
  Cro_Pavo Junior Train Controller

Location: Midland
Yes there were two options considered by Main Roads WA & City of Swan - either to have Lloyd Street open and diverted around the construction area OR to close the entire section of Lloyd Street till next year.

City of Swan agreed to the second option.  It's going to hurt a lot of the business in the area, but construction wise it can hopefully get done quickly without the traffic hassles.
  Cro_Pavo Junior Train Controller

Location: Midland
New deviation lines just a few metres to the north of the existing lines are now under construction at Lloyd Street. These lines will be in place while the underpass is constructed.
  Cro_Pavo Junior Train Controller

Location: Midland
Just a recent project update released from Main Roads WA & McConnell Dowell.

The bridge piers and abutments are complete while the new freight line bridge deck has been concreted.

Looks like the line will be closed on 9 May to allow the freight lines be returned to their original alignment and over the newly constructed bridge.

The temporary alignment will then be closed to allow for the completion of the underpass.
  antiussentiment Locomotive Driver

Location: perth
I drove though this for the first time a few weeks back and was amazed that the builders could not come up with a decent vertical curve.
The bitumen seems to be in a series of flats rather than a gradual  gradient change.

It's like some sort of show ride (even at a modest speed)..

woopdy doopty dooo all the way though.

I can't even think of a good reason for doing it like this..

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