Company Proposes Malaysia-Singapore Train!

 
Topic moved from East and South East Asia by bevans on 16 Dec 2014 11:46
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
THE government may call for an international open tender for the high-speed rail (HSR) link between Kuala Lumpur and Singapore by the end of this year.

This indicates that the 400km project is viable, said people with first-hand knowledge of the matter.

The Land Public Transport Commission (SPAD) has been carrying out a feasibility study on the HSR project since early last year.

The study includes a detailed assessment on the technical and engineering aspects, cost, financial and operations, and economic benefit of the project.
Minister in the Prime Minister's Department Nancy Shukri said on Tuesday the government is finalising details of the technical engineering and feasibility study, adding that a full report is expected by the end of this month.

The project, which was agreed in principle between Malaysia and Singapore in February this year, is targeted for completion by 2020.

The rail link is expected to cost around RM40 billion. This includes RM10 billion to buy high-speed bullet trains.

According to sources, there will be mandatory requirements in the tender procurement that companies must meet before they can make a bid.

These include having a few years of expertise in running high-speed trains and operating railway lines, a source said.
"The other considerations would include transfer of technology, the type of systems used and costs. The government expects train manufacturers from Europe or China to be among the key players," the source said.

Business Times reported recently that several local and foreign firms are in talks to form consortiums.

MMC Corp Bhd may team up with Gamuda Bhd and Chinese and European system integrators.

YTL Corp Bhd, controlled by Tan Sri Francis Yeoh, may bid for the HSR project with Spanish bullet train maker Talgo or CAF.

UEM Group Bhd, meanwhile, is working with Ara Group, founded by Tan Sri Ravindran Menon, to form a consortium with European companies that may also include Talgo.

Global Rail, a railway engineering firm owned by Fan Boon Heng, is talking to Canada's Bombardier Inc and Chinese firm China Railway Group.


Read more: [color=#003399]High-speed rail tender may start year-end[/color] [color=#003399]http://www.btimes.com.my/Current_News/BTIMES/articles/20130711004049/Article/#ixzz2Yiu04eSe[/color]

Sponsored advertisement

  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
THE Land Public Transport Commission (SPAD) will speed up the process of kick-starting the multi-billion ringgit high-speed rail (HSR) link between Kuala Lumpur and Singapore and ensure it is operational by 2020.

Its chief executive officer Mohd Nur Ismal Mohamed Kamal said the feasibility study is in its final stage of preparation.

SPAD has been carrying out a study on the HSR project since early last year.

The study includes a detailed assessment on the technical and engineering aspects, cost, financial and operations, and benefits of the project.
The project was agreed in principle between Malaysia and Singapore in February this year.

Business Times has reported, quoting reliable government sources, that the rail link is expected to cost around RM40 billion. This includes RM10 billion to buy high-speed bullet trains.

For Malaysia, the HSR project is important to support growth in Iskandar Malaysia in Johor.

Investor interest in Iskandar Malaysia is at an all-time high with the completion of key catalytic projects last year and the signing of a new agreement between Malaysia and Singapore this year.

Singapore is one of the largest investors and leading contributors to Iskandar Malaysia.

The HSR project will also complement another rail project - the Rapid Transit System Link - that will link Johor Baru to Singapore's Thomson Line, which is set to be ready by 2019.

Singapore, however, has yet to give its full feedback on the HSR link to the government.

Business Times reported last week that Malaysia may call for an international open tender for the HSR link by the end of this year, indicating that the 400km project is viable.

There will be mandatory requirements in the tender procurement that companies must meet before they can make a bid.

These include having a few years of expertise in running high-speed trains and operating railway lines, the transfer of technology, the type of systems used and costs.

However, Mohd Nur Ismal said that the tender call will commence once the relevant agreements with Singapore are in place.

"We are working very hard to ensure that the Kuala Lumpur-Singapore railway link is operational by 2020.

"The government will identify the best mechanism for project tender and according to existing procedures and guidelines," he said.

Read more: [color=#003399]KL-S'pore high-speed rail link to get SPAD boost[/color] [color=#003399]http://www.btimes.com.my/Current_News/BTIMES/articles/hsrr14/Article/index_html#ixzz2Z5ymcczs[/color]
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Malaysia's Land Public Transport Commission (SPAD) is expected to complete the ongoing feasibility study on the Singapore-Kuala Lumpur high-speed rail (HSR) project by the end of the month and call a tender for the project by the end of 2013.
SPAD has been conducting the study since early 2012, including a detailed assessment on the technical and engineering aspects, cost, financial and operations, and benefits of the rail project.
Once completed, the study will help to speed up the process of constructing the HSR link project with a target to make it operational by 2020.
In February 2013, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur agreed to build the new HSR link in a bid to improve connectivity between the two countries.
"The study will help to speed up the process of constructing the HSR link project with a target to make it operational by 2020."
The 400km HSR project is estimated to cost about MYR40bn ($12.5bn), including MYR10bn ($3.1bn) to buy high-speed bullet trains, according to Business Times.
Following the completion, the rail link will reduce the 315km rail journey between the cities from six hours to around 90 minutes.
A consortium of Aecom Singapore, Aecom Perunding and SA Architects won a contract worth S$52.8m ($42.7m) in May 2013 to carry out an architectural and engineering consultancy study on the proposed HSR project.
Under the deal, the consortium is responsible for developing alignment options for the rapid transit system link, as well as carrying out detailed design on the preferred route, which will be finalised by the Iskandar Malaysia Joint Ministerial Committee (JMC).
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
MALAYSIA: Japan Thursday offered Malaysia technology to build a multi-million-dollar high-speed railway and other infrastructure, as its Prime Minister Shinzo Abe began a regional tour.

Abe's visit to Malaysia, Singapore and the Philippines is the latest of several trips he has made with business leaders since coming to power in December, aimed at drumming up infrastructure deals.

The 58-year-old premier hopes to strengthen ties with Southeast Asian countries, a region enjoying strong economic growth and a potential vibrant marketplace for Japanese products and investment.

"Malaysia and Japan agree to cooperate in high technology with Japan providing the technology in the construction of high-speed rail, water and waste treatment," Abe told reporters at a press conference with his Malaysian counterpart Najib Razak.

Singapore and Malaysia announced plans in February to build the rail link, which would cut travel time for the 350 kilometres (220 miles) between the city-state and Kuala Lumpur by more than half to 90 minutes.

The target year for completion is 2020. The idea was mooted in the 1990s but repeatedly shelved, largely due to cost concerns.

Malaysian media reports in 2009 estimated the cost at $2.5 billion-$3.5 billion. No new cost estimate has been publicly given.

The hawkish right-wing prime minister also said Tokyo would strive for "global peace and stability" and foster closer ties with Southeast Asia.

Abe and Najib also pledged cooperation in other areas, such as finance and security in the Malacca Strait, a once-pirate infested waterway separating Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore.

More than 85 percent of Japan's crude oil from the Middle East travels through the strait. Pirate attacks have decreased markedly in recent years since countries along the waterway stepped up patrols.

This is Abe's second visit to Malaysia after one in 2007.

Japan was Malaysia's largest foreign investor from 1980 to 2012 and is the country's third largest trading partner.

Malaysia has been trying to attract investment to achieve developed nation status by 2020 under a much-touted economic drive.

On Tuesday Japan formally joined negotiations in Malaysia on forming a huge new free trade bloc known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The talks aim to create what would be one of the world's largest free-trade areas, encompassing parts of Asia, Latin America and the US.

Negotiators said in a statement Thursday after the talks ended that that they made "good progress" and would meet again late next month in hopes of agreeing on "more difficult and sensitive issues".

The statement did not elaborate but some countries are eager to protect state interests and sensitive industries, such as Japan with its agricultural sector.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
PUTRAJAYA (AFP) - Japan on Thursday offered Malaysia technology to build a multi-million-dollar high-speed railway and other infrastructure, as its Prime Minister Shinzo Abe began a regional tour.
Mr Abe's visit to Malaysia, Singapore and the Philippines is the latest of several trips he has made with business leaders since coming to power in December, aimed at drumming up infrastructure deals.
The 58-year-old premier hopes to strengthen ties with South-east Asian countries, a region enjoying strong economic growth and a potential vibrant marketplace for Japanese products and investment.
"Malaysia and Japan agree to cooperate in high technology with Japan providing the technology in the construction of high-speed rail, water and waste treatment," Mr Abe told reporters at a press conference with his Malaysian counterpart Najib Razak.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
THE CEO of Malaysia's Land Public Transport Commission (Spad), Mr Mohd Nur Kamal, says he expects tenders to be invited for a high-speed line to link Kuala Lumpur with Singapore by the end of next year. The prime minister of Malaysia Mr Najib Tun Razak and his Singaporean counterpart Mr Lee Hsien Loong pledged in February to complete construction of the railway by 2020.

Technical studies are already underway for the Ringgits 40bn ($US 12.7bn) scheme which involves constructing a 330km standard-gauge from Kuala Lumpur via Seremban, and then following a route via the coastal towns of Melaka, Muar, and Batu Pahat to Johor Bahru, Malaysia's most southerly city, and Singapore.
A maximum speed in excess of 300km/h is envisaged to achieve a journey time of around 90 minutes. This would be highly competitive with air, and much quicker than using the current metre-gauge train service which operates over a 397km route and takes around 7 hours.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
MENAFN) Japan may provide Malaysia with technology to construct high-speed railways and other infrastructure projects, Saudi Gazette reported.

At a joint press conference held by Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, and Malaysian Prime Minister, Najib Razak, Abe said, ¿Malaysia and Japan agree to cooperate in high technology with Japan providing the technology in the construction of high-speed rail, water and waste treatment.¿

Malaysia and Singapore declared that they are planning to establish the railway in February. The project would cut the travel time between Kuala Lumpur and Singapore down to 90 minutes rather than 3 hours now.

The project is seen completed in 2020. In 2009, media reports estimated that the project would cost between USD2.5 billion and USD3.5 billion.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
on August 6, 2013 in Asia and Indonesia Bidding for the proposed new high-speed line to Kuala Lumpur from Singapore will be open to international participants, Malaysian prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak promises. The exact terms of the process are currently under discussion between the two governments, he says. The “multi-billion” Klang Valley mass rapid transit project is also going ahead. - See more at: http://www.railwaysafrica.com/blog/2013/08/malaysia-singapore-high-speed-line/#sthash.qopVhYPz.dpuf
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
SINGAPORE: Alstom, a global leader in the world of power generation, power transmission and rail infrastructure, sees the proposed High Speed Rail Link connecting Singapore and Kuala Lumpur as the right step forward for Malaysia and Singapore.

Seen by many as a strategic development in bilateral relations between the two good neighbours, the proposed high speed railway was announced in February 2013 by the Prime Ministers of Malaysia Datuk Seri Najib Razak and his Singaporean counterpart, Lee Hsien Loong.

Slated for completion by 2020, the high-speed rail link is expected to shorten travel time between the two capitals to just over 90 mins.

With an estimated cost of US$12 billion (RM40 billion), the 330km high-speed rail link has attracted keen interest from various international companies, including from China, Japan, France and Spain.
The project has also caught the attention of Wouter Van Wersch, senior vice-president (East Asia Pacific) of Alstom, who said the distance between the two countries was ideal for a high speed rail link.

"Alstom, as you know, is No 1 in the world for high speed trains. So, this is a key opportunity for us.

"We are very happy that the political sides of both governments have said that they want to proceed. Of course, we, as an industry company, are keen to support, We are waiting to see some of the schedules, when it is going to happen, when we need to provide," he said.

He strongly believes that Alstom is the right partner for this high-speed rail project, given its experience in implementing the Seoul-Busan high speed rail in South Korea.

Alstom is a pioneer of high speed rail and has set the world speed record on rail with 574.8km/h in 2007.

"This is a key opportunity for us. As a leading industry partner, we are keen to support this project. We are very happy that both governments have now agreed to proceed," Van Wersch told Bernama.

While discussions between the two governments are still ongoing, Van Versch cited Alstom’s experience in both countries as a major advantage, expressing his confidence in Alstom’s ability to deliver the high speed rail system effectively.

"I am familiar with the authorities of both countries as Alstom has worked with them on multiple occasions across different sectors. Yes, they are very demanding when it comes to quality, but that is good for Alstom," he said.

He said Alstom was in a position to deliver such a project in a very cost-effective way without compromising on quality and safety which are "our top priorities."

Although details of the project are still largely under wraps, Malaysia's Land Public Transport Commission said recently Malaysia would start detailed talks with Singapore in the coming weeks, leading potentially to a tender process in the second half of next year.

Asked whether Alstom has submitted a proposal for the project, Van Wersch said: "Such a new line is quite a lengthy process. We are not in charge of the process. That is done by the authorities in KL."

"We are waiting for the project to be defined. The milestones, I think at this moment, they are still working on the feasibility study and to look at how the scope will be.

"Only afterwards, when they have decided what to do, then Alstom comes in. We are not actively engaging at the moment," he said.

He said the high speed train is really one of the key products of Alstom.

"We have developed it, we have big expertise, we are already in the third generation of our high speed trains. We have of course, sold a lot of them to Europe. We also export them to South Korea, for example. We have the expertise.

"And I think the link between KL and Singapore is a very visible line. It will be a great reference. We will put a lot of effort into this.

"Of course, it is not only Alstom alone. When we do this, we work with local companies, we build partnerships with Malaysian companies, Singaporean companies, to do everything," he said.

"For example, for the Mass Rapid Transmit (MRT), we provide the rolling stock.

"We call it the cars. We provide all the signalling, and the control systems. There is a big control centre to make sure all the trains run well. We also have a big group that does the tracks. The services. We maintain the rail network, and we ensure that there is continuous improvements on everything," he
said.

In the rail sector, Alstom has provided key rail transport equipment and services to the main rail operator in Peninsular Malaysia, Keretapi Tanah Melayu Bhd or Malayan Railways Ltd and Rapid KL’s Light Rail Transit (LRT) Star and Putra lines.-- Bernama

Read more: [color=#003399]Alstom: High speed rail, right way to go[/color] [color=#003399]http://www.btimes.com.my/articles/20130918110017/Article/#ixzz2fGAad12F[/color]
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
PUTRAJAYA: China has expressed interest in participating in Malaysia’s 330km-long Kuala Lumpur-Singa­pore high speed rail (HSR) link project.
China President Xi Jinping said the project, together with port development and other connectivity projects, were on top of their overseas investment ventures.
He said they were also ready to consider participating in the Nor­thern Economic Corridor development projects.
“The Chinese government will continue to encourage Chinese companies to participate in Malaysia’s railway, port and other connectivity projects.
“The Chinese government is ready to give positive consideration to participate in the Northern Corridor development projects in the appropriate ways,” he said yesterday at a joint press statement with Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak after their bilateral meeting at the Perdana Putra Building here.
Earlier this year, Malaysia and Singapore announced plans for the rail link, which is expected to cut land travelling time between the two countries to just 90 minutes.
The project, targeted to be completed by 2020, is reported to cost about RM40bil. Several local and foreign firms have been reported to have started talks to form consortiums to bid for the project.
The firms are MMC Corp Bhd, which may team up with Gamuda Bhd and Chinese and European system integrators and YTL Corp Bhd with Spanish bullet train maker Talgo or CAF.
Other firms are UEM Group Bhd, which is working with Ara Group to form a consortium with European companies that may also include Talgo, while Global Rail is said to be talking to Canada’s Bombardier Inc and Chinese firm China Railway Group.
Xi said during the bilateral meeting that both governments agreed to maintain high-level contacts and this would help enhance coordination on major issues.
“There will be a closer cooperation in defence, law enforcement, security, naval and military exchange, combating terrorism and transnational crime. By doing so, we are going to create a sound environment for the growth and prosperity of both countries,” he added.
He said both countries had agreed to actively advance the construction of science lab and expand the training and exchanges among young scientists.
He added that both governments would also encourage competent and capable companies to take active part in the space and scientific entrepreneur cooperation.
Meanwhile, International Trade and Industry Minister Datuk Seri Mustapa Moha­med said Malaysia was eyeing 5% of China’s US$500bil (RM1.588tril) outbound investments over the next five years.
The country is also hoping to attract 5% of the 80 million outbound tourists from China searching for a suitable holiday destination.
“With its US$500bil set to flow into other countries, China will be an important investment source for us,” he said at a press conference after the Malaysia-China Economic Sum­mit at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre yesterday.
Mustapa said China’s huge potential was something that should be looked into by the ministry, Malay­sian Investment Development Authority and Malaysia External Trade Development Corporation.
He said China’s investment in Malaysia was less than the other way around.
“Currently, China’s investment in our country is only about 10% of the US$6.3bil (RM20.05bil) of what Malay­sia invested in China,” Mustapa said.
Asked the reasons for the imbalance, he cited the high speed of development experienced by China.
“There are a lot of opportunities for growth there,” he said, adding that Malaysian businessmen were knowledgeable and attuned to the Chinese market.
Mustapa said Malaysia hoped that China’s industry players would invest in the services and manufacturing sectors here. On the event, he said eight business projects worth RM9bil were signed with China.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
COOPERATION: Vice-minister says country’s expertise in the industry can benefit Malaysia
THE Italians are keeping a keen eye on the proposed Kuala Lumpur-Singapore high-speed rail link.

Italian Vice-Minister for Economic Development Carlo Calenda, who is leading a business delegation to Malaysia, said Italy has solid experience in high-speed rail network and this could benefit Malaysia.

"We can help you understand how high-speed railway can be developed. It is expensive and difficult but the results, in terms of business and tourism, are fantastic. At this stage, the government-to-government approach is the right one," Calenda told Business Times yesterday.

He said Italy has invested heavily in the sector in the last 20 years, building three high-speed rail networks linking major cities such as Naples, Rome, Milan, Turin and Venice.
Italy has two major operators, a public railway company and a private firm, and was the first country in Europe to liberalise the high-speed rail sector.

"So, we have the know-how. We are interested to see if there are ways to cooperate in the preliminary stage. We are strong in the industry and we are the fifth-largest country in terms of industrial trade surplus in the world."

He said Finmeccanica, an Italian conglomerate that owns companies with expertise in the rail business, is ideally placed to share its expertise in the high-speed rail link project.

Calenda is leading a delegation of 100 Italians on a two-day mission.

Earlier, Calenda said he was impressed with the presentation by Minister in the Prime Minister's Department, Datuk Seri Idris Jala.

He said Idris has outlined the milestones Malaysia has made in its efforts to become a high-income country by 2020, as well as its due diligence in free trade agreements (FTAs).

"We need to speed up the FTA between the European Union and Malaysia. Italy will take over the presidency of EU in the second half of next year and the agreement with Malaysia will be a priority," Calenda said.

Trade between Malaysia and Italy in the first eight months of this year skewed in favour of the latter.

"Our exports to Malaysia are going well, at almost ?700 million (RM3.09 billion) during the period, up 9.8 per cent from last year. Italy imported ?470 million of products and services from Malaysia, a decrease of 9.6 per cent from last year."

He attributed this to the robust consumption in Malaysia compared with Italy's flat consumption.

On another matter, Idris said Malaysia wants more Italian technology here.

"Italian companies are tops in terms of technology. If we can find a way to put the money and the opportunities together, we can go beyond trade and into more investments together," he added.

Read more: [color=#003399]Italy eyes opportunities in high-speed rail link project[/color] [color=#003399]http://www.btimes.com.my/articles/jalla/Article/#ixzz2n5KzqYjG[/color]
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
TOKYO, Dec. 12 (Xinhua) -- Japan and Malaysia on Thursday agreed here to enhance bilateral business ties over infrastructure cooperation, especially eyeing cooperation in bullet train projects in the Southeast Asian country.
During a joint press conference between Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his Malaysian counterpart Najib Razak, Abe asked Najib to introduce Japan's bullet train technology for a high speed railway project to link Kuala Lumpur and Singapore.
For his part, Najib said his country welcomes Japan's participation in Malaysian infrastructure construction through open bidding.
The two leaders also agreed that the two countries will continue joint maritime safety drills to cope with piracy and other illicit activities in the sea.
Najib arrived in Japan on Thursday morning for the upcoming summit commemorating 40th anniversary of relations between Japan and ASEAN.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Several international firms, including Japanese ones, are eyeing the 330km Kuala Lumpur-Singapore high speed rail link project.

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak said that during his discussions with leading Japanese corporations – three namely Hitachi Ltd, Sumitomo Corporation and Mitsui & Co – had voiced their interest in the project.

He added the Malaysian government was still conducting a project feasibility study. Once completed, the international bidding process would be carried out.

“The companies, including Japanese firms, could then take part in the process,” he told the Malaysian media.

Najib said there were also Chinese and European companies that were interested in the high speed rail link project.

Earlier this year, Malaysia and Singapore announced the rail link, which is expected to cut land travelling time between the two countries to just 90 minutes.

Targeted to be completed by 2020, it is reported to cost about 40 billion ringgit (US$12.4 billion).

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who held a bilateral meeting with Najib earlier, urged for Japanese technology to be considered in the rail link construction.

“This is something which Malaysia should consider adopting as Japan has the Shinkansen high speed railway system,” he said.

Najib said there were opportunities for Japanese companies to take part in the development of Malaysia’s infrastructure through the process of open bidding.

On the second wave of the Look East Policy, Malaysia is eyeing high value investments from the Land of the Rising Sun and those that are up in the value chain, Najib said.

This comes after the positive effect of the first wave of the policy which started in 1982 where Malaysians learned skills, values and the good work ethics practised by the Japanese.

“I told Prime Minister Abe that we are not interested in getting labour intensive investments but are eyeing those that are high tech and that would create a high supply chain.”

Najib also held discussions with Tokuyama Corporation which confirmed a 5 billion ringgit ($1.5 billion) investment for the second phase of its polysilicon plant in Malaysia.

The company had already spent 3 billion ringgit ($279 million) and invited Najib to launch the second phase some time next year.

Japanese firm Toshiba has also confirmed its partnership with 1MDB to set up a high-tech cancer treatment centre, Najib added.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
KUALA LUMPUR: Spanish train maker Patentes Talgo SA is keen to sell its advanced “Avril” super-speed train for the proposed Malaysia-Singapore high-speed rail (HSR) link that is in the early stage of tendering.
"Spain's Talgo eyes..." Developments of events


Talgo’s deputy chairman Mario Oriol said Spanish-made trains are of advanced models in terms of technology and are able to run under challenging climatic conditions.
“For Malaysia, we want to promote our jewel of the crown, the Avril. It is one of the most modern high-speed trains developed and designed for speed of 380km/h, with very high capacity on a single-deck configuration,” Oriol told The Malaysian Reserve in an interview in Kuala Lumpur recently.
The Madrid-based Talgo, which has been in the train-making industry since 1940s, currently controls 50% of the high-speed rail market segment in Spain.
The company’s trains are currently operating in Europe and the US.
In 2011, a Spanish consortium led by Talgo, Renfe, Adif and OHL won the Haramain high-speed rail project connecting Mecca and Medina in Saudi Arabia. The contract is worth €6.5 billion (RM29.32 billion).
In February 2013, top leaders from Malaysia and Singapore agreed to kick-start the HSR project after it was first mooted in the 1990s.
According to Malaysia’s Land Public Transport Commission (SPAD), the project has reached the second stage of its pre-tendering exercise. The 330km network, estimated to cost about RM40 billion, is scheduled to be completed by 2020.
The link will slash travel time between the two destinations to 90 minutes.
Malaysian conglomerates like YTL Corp Bhd, Gamuda Bhd and UEM Group are tipped to compete for the mega project in collaboration with overseas partners.
Senior officials from China, Italy and Japan have expressed interest to sell their train technologies to Malaysia.
Talgo is said to be in talks with several key players in the country although no specific details have been revealed so far.
“We are offering the state of the art technology that will provide very high capacity train with very low energy consumption, low acoustic emission and low impact on infrastructure,” said Oriol.This content is provided by FMT content provider The Malaysian Reserve
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
KUALA LUMPUR: Before getting down to serious business today as part of a leaders’ retreat, Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and his wife Ho Ching were yesterday hosted to a private cruise dinner on Putrajaya Lake by Malaysian Premier Datuk Seri Najib Razak and his wife Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor.

Mr Lee is accompanied at the fifth such retreat by a high-powered delegation including Singapore Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean and eight other ministers. Today, the Singapore leaders will meet their Malaysian counterparts to review progress in bilateral relations and discuss ways to further enhance cooperation across a wide range of areas.

This time, items likely to be on the agenda include the high-speed rail link between Kuala Lumpur and Singapore, the rapid transit system connecting the Republic’s MRT system with Johor Baru and joint projects in Iskandar Malaysia.

Earlier yesterday, Mr and Mrs Lee were shown around Kuala Lumpur’s city centre. They visited the Petronas Twin Towers, where Mr Lee was received by KLCC Property Holdings Executive Director Hashimah Hashim.

During a 30-minute tour, Mr Lee walked around the Bukit Bintang area and Bangsar Village to see new developments that have taken place over the past decade. He also visited KL Sentral and the site of the planned Tun Razak Exchange, a proposed international financial and business hub under Malaysia’s Economic Transformation Programme.

The retreat was started in May 2007 by former Malaysian Premier Abdullah Badawi and Mr Lee in Langkawi. Previous meetings have yielded significant agreements, including a solution to Malayan Railway Land in Singapore.

— Today
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Study to look at engineering feasibility of Kuala Lumpur-Singapore HSR link - Singapore
14.04.2014 15:29
Section: High-speed railways
Singapore’s Land Transport Authority is to conduct an engineering feasibility study into government plans to construct a new high-speed rail link to Kuala Lumpur.
The study will look at possible routes and connectivity with three potential terminal station locations around Tuas West, Jurong East and the city centre
The tender for the study, which is to be completed in the first quarter of 2015, was called today (April 11).
In February 2013, Singapore’s Prime Minister, Lee Hsien Loong, and Malaysian Prime Minister Dato’ Sri Mohd Najib Tun Abdul Razak set out plans for the Kuala Lumpur-Singapore High Speed Rail (HSR) link.
The line is designed to cut the current journey times between the cities to 90 minutes.
LTA has said the consultant picked to carry out the research will also need to look at the impact high-speed rail would have on the current public transport network.
http://www.globalrailnews.com
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Excitement is high over the proposed Malaysia-Singapore high- speed railway (HSR).

But first, significant hurdles need to be overcome.

The two countries must decide on pressing fundamentals. These include the ownership, financing and operating models, as well as the project structure.

Then come decisions such as route alignment, number and location of stations along the way, form and location of checkpoint, and finally, location of depot and terminal stations.

Terminal stations should ideally be in the two city centres, as it would provide the best accessibility to travellers. But this may not be technically feasible or cost-effective, as both city centres are highly built up.

Already, Malaysia has identified Sungai Besi, a location 15km from the Petronas Twin Towers, as a site. That would be about the same distance that Jurong East (a location that Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong seems to favour) is from Singapore's Central Business District.

If the two terminals are in Sungai Besi and Jurong East, a door-to-door commute by HSR is projected to be 190 minutes - still considerably faster than 255 minutes by air.

But these are details to be ironed out further down the line.

First and foremost, the two governments must be convinced that an HSR will be equally beneficial to both Singaporeans and Malaysians for generations to come. And they must have the political will to see the project through.

Indeed, besides financial capability, it is political will that is powering China's HSR programme. For cross-border projects, it was the political will of the Margaret Thatcher and Francois Mitterrand administrations that paved the way for the London-Paris HSR.

If Thatcher and Mitterrand could get the English and French to work together, despite the two countries' legacy of bitter rivalry, there is hope yet for the Kuala Lumpur-Singapore HSR. It is a project the two sides have been mulling for 20 years now.

If it gets off the ground, it could potentially form the first leg of a Southeast Asian network that links all the way up to China.

A look at the history of HSRs across the globe shows that worldwide, they do not seem to have a strong or clear proposition for many countries. Ever since the first line started running in Japan 50 years ago, only 15 other countries have followed suit with their own systems. In comparison, 126 metro systems were built in 50 countries over the same period.

But once overcome, the benefits are many.

Initial obstacles

ONE of the main impediments to HSR projects is cost. And because of the protracted nature of such projects, and their long gestation, cost overruns are also common.

For instance, the London-Paris line was projected to cost £1 billion when the two countries agreed to build it in 1986. By the time it was fully opened in 2007, the bill had escalated to £11 billion, according to a report by The Telegraph.

Land acquisition and environmental concerns (mainly noise pollution) are two other hurdles to HSR projects. Often, the latter cannot be overcome by going underground because of prohibitive cost.

But even if a line does go underground - as in the case of the proposed Tokyo-Nagoya maglev project, through a mountain range - it will still raise the ire of environmentalists.

The fringe benefits of an HSR project are not as apparent as those of a metro line, either. Property prices along the line seldom appreciate. In fact, they are liable to do the opposite. Reports by British realtors indicate that home prices near a new line from London to Manchester have already fallen by 40 per cent - even though the first trains are not expected to run till 2026.

Yet, whenever a HSR line is finally built, it proves its worth fairly quickly.

Faster, green commute

HSR provides a fast, smooth, safe and clean commute.

In a study of fatalities per billion passenger-km operated, the National Society of French Railways found HSR to be significantly safer than travel by air, road and conventional rail.

It is also the greenest. The study found that HSRs in Europe emit only 12g of CO2 per passenger, versus 30g for buses, 115g for cars and 153g for airlines. (France's HSR system supposedly emits only 2.2g of carbon per passenger - because electricity there is largely nuclear.)

Train tickets are also generally cheaper than airfares, and often, trains are faster door-to-door than planes.

The Chinese example

AND there is no better place to witness the rising popularity of HSR than in China, which has the largest HSR network at 10,000km - nearly half of the world's combined network.

And it is an impressive network, too.

When I took an HSR from Guangzhou to Wuhan in mid-2011, I was surprised by how luxurious it was. The seats and legroom were comparable to Business Class on a premium carrier. And even at 330kmh (this was just before the speed curbs following a fatal accident later in the year), it was as quiet and vibration-free as an A-380 plane.

In fact, I found it to be slightly more comfortable than Japan's Shinkansen, and far better than France's TGV.

I had commented to China Railway Corp officials how expansive the Guangzhou South train station was (bigger than some international airport terminals), and how sparsely occupied the trains were. But I was assured that both would be filled soon.

Indeed, HSR is hot in China today. So much so that airlines are feeling the heat.

According to a World Bank report in 2012, within three years of operation, China's HSR had adversely affected domestic airlines.

"Some short-distance air services have been completely withdrawn... routes from Zhengzhou to Xian and from Wuhan to Nanjing both survived only a few months after the opening of HSR," it read.

Air travel demand between Changsha and Guangzhou, a distance of about 600km, has fallen from about 90,000 passengers a month to 30,000.

Airline profits have also plunged, even in cases when actual passenger volume has increased. China Air for instance, posted a 32 per cent drop in earnings last year to 3.26 billion yuan (S$656 million) - despite a 0.4-point improvement in load factor to 80.8 per cent.

HSR ridership is still growing, with the state adding more trains and building new lines.

According to a forecast reported in The New York Times, China's HSR network will carry more passengers per annum than the 54 million carried by US domestic airliners by this year.

The only question mark hanging over China's HSR success story is profitability, and how long it will take to recoup the hundreds of billions in sunk cost.

In fact, this was one reason why the World Bank said it was "cautiously optimistic" about the future of HSR in China.

But the Chinese do not seem overly concerned. To the government, it is too early to talk about financial payback.

Instead, it is pushing ahead with expansion plans, both in terms of increasing the capacity of its current system to cater to growing demand, and expanding the network.

Changsha station for instance, will soon have 32 platforms - double today's 16. And it is all of four years old.

It is also said to be aiming to build another 15,000km of lines by 2020 - some to join up with lines in neighbouring countries such as Laos, Vietnam and Myanmar.

China to Singapore by rail?

LAST October , Chinese Premier Li Keqiang opened an exhibition in Bangkok with Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra promoting a high-speed railway that would link China, Thailand and Singapore.

The proposed line would be able to carry passengers from Kunming in China to Singapore in less than 12 hours, reported China Central Television.

If this comes about, the Kuala Lumpur-Singapore HSR that PM Lee and his Malaysian counterpart, Datuk Seri Najib Razak, aim to build by 2020 may become the first leg of a Southeast Asian network.

The story does not stop there. Professor Wang Mengshu, a rail expert at the Chinese Academy of Engineering, was quoted in 2010 as saying that China was exploring HSR links all the way to Europe.

If so, a traveller here could reach London by rail in under two days. That is, going by today's HSR capabilities.

China is working on much higher speeds. It is home to the world's only commercial magnetic-levitation (maglev) system. The 30km line takes passengers from downtown Shanghai to Pudong International Airport (30km) in seven minutes, reaching a top speed of 431kmh.

(I took a ride on it in 2005, and it was like flying at ground level.)

Japan has conducted test runs of its new maglev trains, reaching close to 500kmh. And China is said to be testing a "Vactrain" - a maglev in an enclosed vacuum tunnel - capable of 1,000kmh.

If these come about, one could commute from Singapore to London by train in 15-16 hours (including stops) - faster than a door-to-door commute by air (17-18 hours) today.

That is unlikely to happen in the near future. But 400-500kmh trains are conceivable, even without maglev technology.

It is therefore wise for builders of new lines to take this into consideration - to ensure that the tracks, power lines and signalling systems are capable of handling such speeds, or can be scaled up to do so.

But even before Singapore and Malaysia get to discuss such technical issues, they have to overcome the initial hump: Get over the barriers of high cost and environmental concerns, manage public expectations, and demonstrate clear political will to turn the Malaysia-Singapore HSR from rhetoric into reality.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
EXCITEMENT is high over the proposed Malaysia-Singapore high-speed railway (HSR). But, first, significant hurdles need to be overcome.
The two countries must decide on pressing fundamentals - including the ownership, financing and operating models, as well as the project structure.
Then come issues such as route alignment, the number and location of stations along the way, the form and location of checkpoints and, finally, the location of depot and terminal stations.
Ideally, the terminals should be right in the two capitals, to give the greatest access.
Malaysia has identified Sungai Besi, located 15km from the Petronas Twin Towers, as a possible site. That is roughly how far Jurong East (a location that Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong seems to favour) is from the Central Business District here.
If those are indeed the final sites, a door-to-door commute by HSR would take 190 minutes - still considerably less than the 255 minutes needed by air.
Such details can be ironed out further down the line.
First and foremost, the two governments must be convinced that an HSR would benefit both Singaporeans and Malaysians for generations to come. And they must have the political will to see the project through.
A look at the history of HSRs around the globe suggests that they do not offer a strong or clear proposition for many countries. Since Japan started running its line, taking the lead 50 years ago, only 15 other countries have followed suit. In contrast, 126 metro systems have been built in 50 countries over the same period.
INITIAL OBSTACLES
One of the main impediments is cost. For instance, the London-Paris line was projected to cost £1 billion (S$2.1 billion) when Britain and France agreed to build it in 1986. By the time, it was fully opened in 2007, the bill had risen to £11 billion, according to a report by The Telegraph.
Land acquisition and environmental concerns (mainly noise pollution) present two other hurdles.
Moreover, the fringe benefits of an HSR project are not as apparent as those of a metro line. Prices of property along an HSR line seldom appreciate. Indeed, they are liable to do the opposite.
Reports by British realtors indicate that prices of homes near an upcoming line from London to Manchester have already fallen by 40 per cent - even though the first trains are not expected to run until 2026.
FASTER, GREEN COMMUTE
HSRs provide a fast, smooth, safe and clean commute.
In a study of fatalities per billion passenger-km operated, the National Society of French Railways found HSR travel to be significantly safer than travel by air, road or conventional rail.
It is also the greenest option. The study found that HSRs in Europe emit only 12g of carbon dioxide per passenger, versus 30g for buses, 115g for cars and 153g for airliners.
In addition, train tickets are generally cheaper than airfares and, door to door, trains get you there faster than planes.


Full article: [color=#003399]http://www.malaysia-chronicle.com/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=266072:kl-spore-high-spreed-rail-perils-and-promise&Itemid=2#ixzz2zKx0bIz1

Follow us: @MsiaChronicle on Twitter
[/color]
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
Is the proposal to again utilise the until recently used rail corridor across the causeway and into Singapre proper?

This would provide the best access to the downtown area of Singapore.

190 minutes is a very good time which should make the service a winner.

Will the service be constructed using standard gauge ?
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Is the proposal to again utilise the until recently used rail corridor across the causeway and into Singapre proper?

This would provide the best access to the downtown area of Singapore.

190 minutes is a very good time which should make the service a winner.

Will the service be constructed using standard gauge ?
freightgate

The new high speed line will be standard gauge in line with the proposed Bangkok to China line.

I have not yet seen any mention of how this line will access Singapore or for that matter just where in Singapore the line will terminate. I suspect that the old station site will be well and truly redeveloped by the time these plans come to anything therebye ruling out that site as a terminous. I suspect that a tunnelled allignment will be used in Singapore.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
TOKYO, May 21 (Bernama) -- Malaysia welcomes Japan's participation in the international bidding process for the Kuala Lumpur-Singapore high speed rail project to be conducted in the near future, said Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak here Wednesday.

His counterpart Shinzo Abe had earlier expressed a wish that Japanese companies would be able to participate in the project while at the same time inviting Malaysia to leverage on Japan's technology and know-how in infrastructure developments.

Speaking at a joint press conference held after a bilateral meeting here, Najib said Abe also expressed a wish that Malaysia would adopt the Shinkansen system, stressing its cutting-edge technology and safety record.

"Particularly with regard to the Kuala Lumpur-Singapore high-speed railway project, I reiterated my expectation for Malaysia to adopt Japan's high-speed railway system, the Shinkansen," said Abe.

In 2013, Singapore and Malaysia agreed to build a high-speed rail link by 2020 that will cut travel time between Singapore and Malaysia's capital Kuala Lumpur to 90 minutes.

Apart from high-speed rail, Malaysia also welcomes collaboration between the private sectors of both countries in various infrastructure projects in Malaysia, including green technology, port equipment, water treatment projects and development along the Malaysia-Thai border, Najib said.

"I also shared with Abe that further focus will be synergised into these areas as it will contribute towards Malaysia's Vision 2020 as represented by the vertical thrusts in our 12 National Key Economic Areas," he said.

Both countries will continue to implement investment-friendly policies and introduce new competitive incentives to further stimulate economic activities especially by the private sector, said Najib.

During the meeting, the two prime ministers also discussed ways to strengthen the Look East Policy Second Wave (LEP 2.0)

"The next phase of LEP 2.0 will continue to enhance institutional cooperation in training and education with a stronger economic focus on elevating trade and investment potential in priority areas of both countries," Najib said, adding several early deliverables or projects/programmes covering education and research and development were discussed.

These included uplifting the role of the Malaysia Japan International Institute of Technology (MJIIT) and enhancing business-to-business linkages/exchanges especially among small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the food and automotive sectors.

On maritime safety and law enforcement, Najib stressed that Malaysia and Japan have established strong cooperation in capacity building and human resource development, while expressing Malaysia's gratitude to the Japan Coast Guard (JCG) for its contribution in enhancing the capacity of the Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA).

"We look forward to deepening the cooperation between MMEA and JCG on human resource development in maritime security and maritime safety," he said.

On Malaysia's chairmanship of Asean in 2015, Najib stressed that Malaysia would work closely with the other Asean members in realising the Asean Community and the creation of a truly 'people-centred Asean'.

"We count on the support and cooperation from Japan towards achieving an Asean Community by 2015," he said.

Najib and Abe also agreed that issues concerning overlapping claims in the South China Sea should be addressed through peaceful means, including through dialogues and discussions among the countries concerned, without resorting to the threat or use of force, in accordance with universally recognised principles of international law, including the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).

Stressing that the meeting had been very fruitful and constructive, covering a wide range of bilateral and regional issues of mutual interest, Najib reiterated Malaysia's readiness to work closely with Japan to work towards a progressive and vibrant relationship.
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
This air route is quite busy but not as busy as Sydney to Melbourne.

This distance is similar.  This route would be a lot like Sydney to Melbourne on high speed.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Any one of you out there resembles Sheldon Cooper (The Big Bang Theory) who loves train and claim yourself as a train maniac? (Hands up!)
[color=#5d4370][img]https://s2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/NNLwhcwc9A5w89KfEOP25A--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7cT04NTt3PTYzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en-SG/homerun/vulcanpost.com/01d450c2db1ad5603362ddbdf85471c5[/img]Image Credit: Pincaption[/color]

[color=#5d4370]Malaysia has a plan drawn every five years that serves as a guideline in developing the country. During the [color=#5d4370]6[size=1]th Malaysia Plan[/color] in 1991,[color=#5d4370]Vision 2020[/color] was proposed by Tun Dr Mahathir bin Mohamad in developing Malaysia into an industrialized country encompassing most aspects from economic prosperity, political stability, social well-being, educational as well as a developed united nation.[/size][/color]
Malaysia is currently in its 10th Malaysia Plan and will be drawing a plan for the next five year soon as 2015 approaches. In order to achieve Vision 2020, a bullet train is proposed in the 11th Malaysia Plan.
The Plan
Preliminary discussions of a High Speed Railway (HSR) linking between Kuala Lumpur to [color=#5d4370]Singaporehave been made.[/color]
[color=#5d4370][img]https://s.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/NFZGaa4h0I17MYmDnkuX.Q--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7cT04NTt3PTYzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en-SG/homerun/vulcanpost.com/f467dad230d2ec6b2489d20509da8806[/img]Image Credit: The Malaysian Insider[/color]
Akihiro Ota, the Transport Minister of Japan recently visited Malaysia and had discussions with Malaysia Transport Minister, Liow Tiong Lai. Liow informs that Malaysia [color=#5d4370]welcome Japan’s proposalon technology as well as financial package on the rail project. An [color=#5d4370]RM40bil price tag[/color] was estimated and is expected to be built by 2020.[/color]
“We are racing against time,” Liow said.
The HSR which stretches approximately 320km with the journey from Kuala Lumpur to Singapore takes roughly [color=#5d4370]90 minutes.[/color]
Many countries including China, South Korea, France, Germany, Britain as well as Spain have expressed interest in the project. Malaysia is yet to appoint tenders whilst both Malaysia and Singapore are conducting feasibility studies.
It is reckoned that bidding for the project will most likely be held in 2015 or later.
Also read: [color=#5d4370]Electric Vehicles to Roam the Malaysian Roads in August![/color]
The System
As told by Liow, the Shinkansen System is “one of the best in the world.”
[color=#5d4370][img]https://s3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/vwy1M8BPcFoGTspqdE2XSA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7cT04NTt3PTYzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en-SG/homerun/vulcanpost.com/46616b1aaaf5ea2399bf493c09b4dec9[/img]Image Credit: Explorejapan.jp[/color]
Ota expressed that Japan is prepared to provide know-how to build communities along the line and cooperate in financing. Plus, he definitively pin point the reliability and safety of the Shinkansen system.
What is Shinkansen?
Japan is the pioneer in [color=#5d4370]Shinkansen (bullet train) network which has been developed for more than 40 years.[/color]
The first generation train in 1964 runs at up to 200km/h (125mph). The technology of Shinkansen was then further developed and improved. 40 years later, the N700 series Shinkansen was introduced and could accelerates up to 300km/h (186mph).
The train is able to fit up for 636 passengers and seat widths are divided into two types, first class and economy class, with latter class seats being 5 inches smaller than the former.
[color=#5d4370][img]https://s.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/AbRMPmZ7G22vGp4DgjRZuw--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7cT04NTt3PTYzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en-SG/homerun/vulcanpost.com/7a23f41005188bc36743a45ffd8268db[/img]Image Credit: USJHSR.com[/color]
Features
No passenger fatality or injury has been recorded in the course of billions of passenger movements since the beginning commercial operation in the Central Japan Railway Company’s (JR Central) Shinkansen, providing the assurance of safety.
Much research has been done to reduce noise level. The aerodynamic design of the train not only reduces air resistance, but also increases energy efficiency, thus decreasing noise level.
With an approximation of 50% lower consumption rate than other railway system, the N700 has the lowest carbon footprint compared to all existing HSR, contributing to green transport.
Japan is famous for its punctuality and reliability. The Shinkansen recorded an annual delay per train of 36 seconds throughout the entire network in Japan and this is extremely remarkable!
Have a peak at the N700 Series Shinkansen HSR system here:



Although the project is still years ahead and under discussions, we are certainly excited about connecting Malaysia and Singapore nearer to each other.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
KUALA LUMPUR – East Japan Railway Co. will tout its Shinkansen system in Kuala Lumpur to help win an order for a high-speed railway project that will link Malaysia and Singapore, informed sources have disclosed.
The JR East group is expected to run Shinkansen posters as early as next month on a four-car monorail to be introduced on a route in central Kuala Lumpur, according to the sources. The 8.6-km monorail route extends through downtown districts such as Bukit Bintang.
The group also hopes to increase the number of Malaysian tourists to Japan by promoting its Gala Yuzawa ski resort in Niigata Prefecture. Snowy venues are a popular destination for Malaysian visitors, according to JR East.
Malaysia and Singapore have agreed to build a high-speed railway by 2020 that will connect Kuala Lumpur with Singapore in 90 minutes. In addition to Japan, China and European countries also appear to be interested in the project.
Transport minister Akihiro Ota made a sales pitch for Shinaksen technology in a meeting with Malaysian ministers last month.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
A Japanese consortium has begun groundwork ahead of bidding forthe high-speed rail project linking Singapore to Kuala Lumpur.
Four major companies -the East Japan Railway Company(JR-East), Sumitomo Corporation, Hitachi and Mitsubishi HeavyIndustries - intend to offer the efficiency andreliability of Japan's Shinkansen bullet train system.



NOTE: Reuters has not verified this story and does not vouchfor its accuracy.

Sponsored advertisement

Subscribers: awsgc24, biqua, Boss, calt

Display from:   

Quick Reply

We've disabled Quick Reply for this thread as it was last updated more than six months ago.