Port Lincoln notes

 
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

But who would blow the whistle at the many rail crossings between Wudinna and Penong Jct.?
As there is no regular rail traffic, I'm sure the locals would have adopted the attitude "I don't need to stop/look for trains as they don't run here anymore."

LaughingLaughingLaughing
"Guard Class 2"
Pull the PIS computer out of a 3000 Class DEMU and program in the locations required. Sure, it will be a bit of a problem that it will be blaring out random station names and infantile safety announcements instead of sounding the horn, but that's a minor detail.

Sponsored advertisement

  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
Back to the serious side of the topic for a moment, the loco transfer last week did not quite go as planned. 1603 suffered a minor fire in its electrical cabinet while the Wudinna-bound empty grain train was in the vicinity of Coomunga. It was shut down, then went along for the ride to Wudinna. 850 was removed from the consist and taken on to Minnipa and Thevenard, and the remaining three 830s brought the dead 1603 and grain train back to Port Lincoln. It appears that the load was reduced at Cummins to bring the trailing load down enough for Pearlah bank.

1603 was repaired on Friday and is running again on a grain train today.

Thevenard currently has just 850, 902 and 1601 to run the gypo.

Peter
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
1603 and 1606 ran through to Thevenard two weeks ago to supplement the three locos there. Unfortunately 1606 failed on its first gypo run. 1606 and 902 left Thevenard light engine for Port Lincoln on Monday, reaching Minnipa that day. They were supposed to continue to Cummins on Tuesday, to be picked up by a grain train, but a council grader damaged the track at Pygery. Once the track was repaired the light engines were able to proceed to Lock where they were attached to a grainy. 902 was pushing 1606, giving the crew a roomy, quiet ride.

1204 is finally back in traffic after more tweaking, bringing the regular operation of quad Alcos at Port Lincoln to an end for now.

842 and 847 are set aside at Port Lincoln with their cabs boarded up to deter vandalism. 1604 (badly damaged in a shunting accident at Cummins last year) is being returned to Port Lincoln from Port Augusta workshops. It has not been repaired, and will be used as a source of spares. It is expected to arrive in Port Lincoln on 26 April.

The EDI workshops at Port Lincoln were taken over by GWA on 4 April, completing the bringing "in-house" of track and mechanical maintenance at Port Lincoln.

Grain train working is still scheduled to change to a single train on 1 May. The standard consist is likely to be 1200-830-830-1200 hauling 64 HCN and HAN hoppers, although this may change.
  NR 35 Station Master

Location: south australia
We were in Pt Lincoln last week and were lucky enough to see a Grainy leaving Pt Lincoln with quad 830's on the front. Here is a video of it approaching Coomunga with 851, 848 ,846 and 859.


http://youtu.be/wlgH5lla6V0
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
The planned change to single grain train working on Eyre Peninsula took effect today. Instead of two rakes of 54 hoppers, now only one train of 64 hoppers is being scheduled. Up to now the workings have been on a consistent 24-hour cycle, but the one train now running will be worked more intensively so that the total tonnage moved by rail is not reduced. That will involve more days with two return runs to Cummins, and also breaking away from the 24-hour cycle. From a railfan point of view that makes services less predictable, of course. The other visible difference is that the HBN dual-service ballast/grain hoppers have now been removed from grain traffic. Trains will now include only HAN and HCN hoppers.

Yesterday (30 April) the last two scheduled 54-wagon trains ran. 4CE1 to Warramboo departed just before 10am, and with 1204 still giving trouble, quad 830s in the form of 851/848/846/859 did the honours. The consist included three HBN hoppers. 4BC1 to Rudall departed four hours later with the usual power of 906/873/1203. This train had six HBNs, and they had been marshalled together at the front to assist in shunting them out on their return.

Today (1 May) the extended consist workings began. 5AE1 to Cummins got away around 9:30am behind 1204/851/848/859/1203. An extra 830 had been included as 'insurance' for 1204. The AE1/AE2 Cummins trains now convey 60 hoppers (not 64) to avoid excessive shunting, as the Cummins Bunker siding can only accommodate 30. Other workings will have the full 64 hopper load. 5AE2 is due back in Port Lincoln late this afternoon for unloading, and is due to depart as 5CG1 to Wudinna at 10:45pm tonight.

Here is 4BC1 snaking out of Port Lincoln yesterday. Note the six HBNs at the front of the consist:


5AE1 today has arrived at Cummins. 30 hoppers have been left on the main line, and the locos are propelling the first 30 into the Cummins Bunker area for loading:


Single-train workings will be trialled for the next two weeks, then reviewed and any necessary adjustments made.

Cheers,
Peter
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
846 and 905 left Port Lincoln for Thevenard on Monday. 905 went along to 'taxi' a dead 850 back to Port Lincoln for workshops attention. Thevenard's allocation is currently 846, 1601, 1603 and 1606.

1204 only managed one trip to Cummins on the revised train working. Since then the load has been managed by 1203-859-848-851.

Cheers,
Peter
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
The best laid plans...

1203 has failed, and looks like being out of action until mid-next week at the earliest. 1204 failed an abbreviated test run, so it is also still unavailable. With the three operational NJs currently working at Thevenard, the grain train for the next few days is being handled by a quintet of Alcos! 906 has joined the four 830s on the train, although the load has been reduced slightly to 60 wagons.

Cheers,
Peter
  AN830 Locomotive Driver

Location: Adelaide, South Australia
The best laid plans...

1203 has failed, and looks like being out of action until mid-next week at the earliest. 1204 failed an abbreviated test run, so it is also still unavailable. With the three operational NJs currently working at Thevenard, the grain train for the next few days is being handled by a quintet of Alcos! 906 has joined the four 830s on the train, although the load has been reduced slightly to 60 wagons.

Cheers,
Peter
pjknife

Peter

With them going to just a single train, will they still running trains out to Wudiuna and Kimba?

Cheers
Tom
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
Peter

With them going to just a single train, will they still running trains out to Wudinna and Kimba?

Cheers
Tom
AN830


Yes Tom, both are still served. 7BG1 is en route to Kimba right now, and both have been visited in the last week.

Cheers,
Peter
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
7BG1 yesterday at Waddikee, with 906-848-859-873-851 in charge. 18 hoppers dropped at Waddikee for loading and pickup on return, 42 hoppers taken on to Kimba.



Cheers,
Peter
  hosk1956 Deputy Commissioner

Location: no where near gunzels
7BG1 yesterday at Waddikee, with 906-848-859-873-851 in charge. 18 hoppers dropped at Waddikee for loading and pickup on return, 42 hoppers taken on to Kimba.



Cheers,
Peter
pjknife

Is that a 'Pent-alco' of locomotives? That would be a sight and sound to stir my loins.

Wayne
  greasyrhys Chief Commissioner

Location: MacDonald Park, SA
Nice photo Peter. I gotta go there one day.
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
Quads, quins, now a little sex...  1204 is leading #3AE1 to Cummins today, added in front of 906-902-848-873-859. Seen here departing Port Lincoln with 60 hoppers:



This is also 902's first run on a grainy since returning from Thevenard.

Cheers,
Peter
  mrjones Station Master

Quads, quins, now a little sex... 1204 is leading #3AE1 to Cummins today, added in front of 906-902-848-873-859. Seen here departing Port Lincoln with 60 hoppers:



This is also 902's first run on a grainy since returning from Thevenard.

Cheers,
Peter
pjknife

Hi Peter any reason the 900's don't lead gotta be easier than squinting out the 830 windows, having been in both I know which I would prefer to spend the day in?

Surprised the EPA haven't banned that consist given the amount of smoke they would make and how much oil would be dropped on the track LaughingRazz
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
Hi Peter any reason the 900's don't lead gotta be easier than squinting out the 830 windows, having been in both I know which I would prefer to spend the day in?

Surprised the EPA haven't banned that consist given the amount of smoke they would make and how much oil would be dropped on the track LaughingRazz
mrjones

The 900s generally face north, as that's the way they are used for shunting the jetty sidings. 906 has been leading the quin out of town recently. 1204's presence today was yet another test, and if it runs OK then we should see 3 x 830/900 plus 1204 on the train for the time being. The other consideration in marshalling is that the end locos in the consist are supposed to have sat phones, and not all locos at Port Lincoln have them fitted.

Would the EPA even know where Port Lincoln is?  Laughing

Cheers,
Peter
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".

pjknifeWould the EPA even know where Port Lincoln is?

Oversea's isn't it Peter! Laughing

This is a bit of a joke and I think Peter knows it as well!
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
902 left Port Lincoln by road for Whyalla on 20 May 2014. It is now on the narrow gauge at Whyalla.

The grain train has settled down to a fairly regular pattern, dumping in the evening and running out overnight to the selected loading point. Only one run per day is occurring, except for days like today when there were two return workings to Cummins. Despite Viterra's assurances, there is no way the same annual tonnage as before can be railed to Port Lincoln under these arrangements. 1204/859/851/1203 are now the most common power on the grain workings.

Some Thevenard loco swaps occurred last month (while I was away), and another has occurred this week. 1603/846 left Port Lincoln for Thevenard yesterday, at the same time as 848/850 left Thevenard for Port Lincoln. Crews rested and swapped power at Minnipa before returning today. Thevenard now has 846, 873, 1601 and 1603. 1606 is still receiving attention at Port Lincoln workshops.

Cheers,
Peter
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
For quite a few years now the state of the track between Ceduna and the gypsum mine at Kevin has left most observers shaking their heads in wonder at how the trains keep running. The track has had a deleterious effect on the locos in particular, with a high rate of failures because of its roughness. This situation existed because GWA have been on a month-to-month contract since the last long-term contract expired, so were obviously unwilling to invest beyond minimal maintenance.

The good news is that Gypsum Resources Australia (GRA) and GWA have signed a new 10-year contract, and this will trigger a major upgrade investment in the line by GWA.

In the short term, some surplus RSK hoppers (without bogies) will be transferred from Whyalla to Port Lincoln where they will be mounted on bogies from the stored ENHB hoppers (which will in turn be scrapped). The RSKs will be used to increase the length of the gypsum train. Longer term, rerailing with 80 lb rail (and a little 107 lb rail) and new ballast are planned.

The gypo lives!

Cheers,
Peter
  phower Chief Commissioner

Location: Over on Kangaroo Island Sth Aust
For quite a few years now the state of the track between Ceduna and the gypsum mine at Kevin has left most observers shaking their heads in wonder at how the trains keep running. The track has had a deleterious effect on the locos in particular, with a high rate of failures because of its roughness. This situation existed because GWA have been on a month-to-month contract since the last long-term contract expired, so were obviously unwilling to invest beyond minimal maintenance.

The good news is that Gypsum Resources Australia (GRA) and GWA have signed a new 10-year contract, and this will trigger a major upgrade investment in the line by GWA.

In the short term, some surplus RSK hoppers (without bogies) will be transferred from Whyalla to Port Lincoln where they will be mounted on bogies from the stored ENHB hoppers (which will in turn be scrapped). The RSKs will be used to increase the length of the gypsum train. Longer term, rerailing with 80 lb rail (and a little 107 lb rail) and new ballast are planned.

The gypo lives!

Cheers,
Peter
pjknife

That is some good news   wonder how far they will upgrade??
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
That is some good news wonder how far they will upgrade??
phower

Just the Thevenard-Kevin line, which desperately needs it.

Cheers,
Peter
  AN830 Locomotive Driver

Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Just the Thevenard-Kevin line, which desperately needs it.

Cheers,
Peter
pjknife

How heavy is the rail on the line at moment?
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
How heavy is the rail on the line at moment?
AN830

You might be better not to ask actually as it was not called "The Hoop Iron Railway " for nothing, or as one railways commissioner said of it two pieces of fencing wire laid on some timber to support it! He was not far from the truth either!
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
How heavy is the rail on the line at moment?
AN830

David is right, the EP lines were called the Hoop Iron Railway for good reason!

I believe the Kevin line is still basically 63lb rail. There is still a stockpile of 80+ lb rail stored at Kimba, recovered from the Trans line when it was relaid around 30 years ago, as well as some 107 lb rail stored at Port Lincoln from the BHP Coffin Bay tramway. We'll possibly see a mix of those two used to upgrade the gypsum line.

Cheers,
Peter
  AN830 Locomotive Driver

Location: Adelaide, South Australia
David is right, the EP lines were called the Hoop Iron Railway for good reason!

pjknife


Wouldn't it be right to called the Eyre Peninsula rail network a working railway museum these days!

Isn't a fair bit of the track between Pt Lincoln and Cummins now a 107ib rail?
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
Isn't a fair bit of the track between Pt Lincoln and Cummins now a 107ib rail?
AN830

There are a few selected short sections of 107 lb rail, but the majority of Port Lincoln-Cummins is still 80 lb. The whole section has new steel sleepers and ballast and welded rail though.

As anticipated, seven ex-BHP RSK hoppers have been transferred from Whyalla to Port Lincoln. Those involved are nos. 6, 24, 29, 73, 75, 89 and 114. They have been placed on bogies recovered from ENHV 'boxcar hoppers' which were scrapped here about 5 years ago. The RSKs will receive workshop attention here (extent of work unknown) before going to Thevenard.

Cheers,
Peter

Sponsored advertisement

Display from:   

Quick Reply

We've disabled Quick Reply for this thread as it was last updated more than six months ago.