Auscision Models Blog

 
  DQ2004 Chief Commissioner

Location: Hobart -where the rain has lumps in it
Toby

All I can say that I was an appointed fireman in 67 for a couple of years in 1967, & from memory I was still an Acting fireman only & on the 46cl dayshift wash when it arrived.  Certainly I would say 65 at the latest.  The only thing I can think of is would the paint job have been a one off as an early experimental scheme.

Other than that I will have to bow to the book experts.
a6et
If you started as a fireman in 1967 then surely that correlates with the first repaint in 1967?
In regards to experimental schemes that would certainly have drawn attention and I'd be very surprised if someone hadn't noticed this before now.
AFAIK the only NSWGR experimental schemes occurred in the 70's with a few 44's and also just prior to the reverse scheme appearing on a few other locos.
I'm quite sure the new scheme would have been noticed so there would be photos about. I'm afraid you will have to bow to the book experts unless you have some other evidence.

Regards

Toby

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  a6et Minister for Railways

If you started as a fireman in 1967 then surely that correlates with the first repaint in 1967?
In regards to experimental schemes that would certainly have drawn attention and I'd be very surprised if someone hadn't noticed this before now.
AFAIK the only NSWGR experimental schemes occurred in the 70's with a few 44's and also just prior to the reverse scheme appearing on a few other locos.
I'm quite sure the new scheme would have been noticed so there would be photos about. I'm afraid you will have to bow to the book experts unless you have some other evidence.

Regards

Toby
"DQ2004"


Toby,

One had to start as a Trainee Engineman non acting fireman, meaning a locomotive cleaner, then progress through age & seniority through safe working schools, examinations & trial trips, more examinations through the grades from Trainee Engineman Qualified (Acting fireman) then appointed as Fireman when vacancy occured, then through to driver.  

I started in January 64, AF in October that year & appointed (promoted to) fireman December 1965.

So, I will bow to the book of truth.
  FirstStopCentral Chief Train Controller

Toby,

One had to start as a Trainee Engineman non acting fireman, meaning a locomotive cleaner, then progress through age & seniority through safe working schools, examinations & trial trips, more examinations through the grades from Trainee Engineman Qualified (Acting fireman) then appointed as Fireman when vacancy occured, then through to driver.  

I started in January 64, AF in October that year & appointed (promoted to) fireman December 1965.

So, I will bow to the book of truth.
a6et
AND books are always right...      Cool

Paul
  gw0071 Deputy Commissioner

Slightly off-topic if you'll humour me - how were the pantographs of a 46 extended/retracted?

I'm guessing spring tension/pneumatics released by a solenoid powered from a DC battery bus

Close?
  a6et Minister for Railways

Slightly off-topic if you'll humour me - how were the pantographs of a 46 extended/retracted?

I'm guessing spring tension/pneumatics released by a solenoid powered from a DC battery bus

Close?
"gw0071"


There were two buttons in each cab, Panto up & Down.

They activated air operated valves that pushed them up or down & the pressure holds them up.  There were also solenoids that worked through the whole set up.  
Inside the motor room there was air storage tanks with control cocks both handle & a valve.  When stabling them, you operned up both which allowed the storage tanks to fully charge with air which you would hear going into them, from the Main Reservoir tanks. When the air flow stopped you closed both controls, & used the solinoid which had a trip underneath it, located near the pipes to drop the pantographs. Once they came down you then pushed the solinoid back into normal position.

If the engine remained in stored condition & the air leaked out of the tanks, there was a hand pump situated near it, & you had to pump it up, you made sure only one solinoid was in the normal position, as it was hard enough to pump up one, let alone 2 at the same time. If another one was nearby you could couple the MR air hose to it & charge the MR tanks, a lot easier & just use that air to raise them.

My books very much packed away & its been many years since I was on them & thats a rough idea.
  TedFreeman Locomotive Driver

Location: Toowoomba, Queensland
There were two buttons in each cab, Panto up & Down.

They activated air operated valves that pushed them up or down & the pressure holds them up.  There were also solenoids that worked through the whole set up.  
Inside the motor room there was air storage tanks with control cocks both handle & a valve.  When stabling them, you operned up both which allowed the storage tanks to fully charge with air which you would hear going into them, from the Main Reservoir tanks. When the air flow stopped you closed both controls, & used the solinoid which had a trip underneath it, located near the pipes to drop the pantographs. Once they came down you then pushed the solinoid back into normal position.

If the engine remained in stored condition & the air leaked out of the tanks, there was a hand pump situated near it, & you had to pump it up, you made sure only one solinoid was in the normal position, as it was hard enough to pump up one, let alone 2 at the same time. If another one was nearby you could couple the MR air hose to it & charge the MR tanks, a lot easier & just use that air to raise them.

My books very much packed away & its been many years since I was on them & thats a rough idea.
"a6et"


In Sydney Yard, I recall having to hold them up manually with a special pole until the air took over to hold them up, it was a real struggle as I ain't too tall.
  a6et Minister for Railways

In Sydney Yard, I recall having to hold them up manually with a special pole until the air took over to hold them up, it was a real struggle as I ain't too tall.
"TedFreeman"


That happened, especially when an air leak was in the storage reservoir, & yep it happened to me as well, & seem to take an eternity for there to be enough air to hold them up.
  Sydney Yard Beginner

The Special Pole mentioned was a long wood pole with a metal hook arrangement fitted at the end, this was named  by crews " The Hooked Stick".
Officially it was for the purpose of reaching up to the roof of the loco. to open a large knife switch on the roof near the Pantograph for the purpose of isolating the 1500 V from the loco if for some reason it was not possible to drop the Pantograph due to it welding itself to the contact wire or becoming caught up in the overhead wire or any other reason.
In reality this device was used frequently for the purpose of manually lifting and then holding the Pantograph against the overhead contact wire, when there was no stored air available to raise the Panto.  This was to allow the 1500 V Compressors to run, and when enough pressure built up and to then supply air for the Panto. to stay raised. A manually operated large hand pump was provided but this was very exhausting and difficult to use as in many cases there were so many air leaks in the system that it was difficult to manually raise enough air pressure to overcome these leaks and still have enough pressure to raise the Panto.  This procedure was unofficial but a blind eye was turned to it as many a train delay or loco. failure would have occurred if it was not performed by the crew. It was not without it's risks and danger and was not something recommended in wet weather, ( holding this long wood pole up to the Panto. and holding it against the !500 V overhead.)  The pole itself was carried on a series of hooks on the inside roof of the passageway from the No. 1 end cab and to remove it for use outside the loco was quiet difficult as it had to be manipulated through the open side drivers cab window as the drivers side door opened inward and prevented it's passage directly out of the cab.
The reason I have elaborated on this is to inform those who may not be aware that the same  " Hooked Stick " was used on the " U Boat "  Single Deck Inter - Urbans  but in their case was " visible for all to see " as it was fitted on brackets along the edge of the black painted frame or side sill below the stainless steel fluting  on the  " U Boat " motor cars.  The provision of this device on the I. U. cars was for the same official purpose as it was for the 46 class locos, but as the I. U. cars had at least two motor cars, each with a manual pump as well as a Panto. air storage reservoir, ( and of course three or four motor cars if in a 6 or 8 car set) there was far less need to use this device for it's more common unofficial use to raise the Pantograph,  and they were progressively removed from these cars. Those modelling the " U Boats " in their earlier years of operating should have a representation of the " Hooked Stick" fitted to the side of the frame to be prototypical.
  TedFreeman Locomotive Driver

Location: Toowoomba, Queensland
Sydney Yard ?

Your comprehensive description assured me I wasn't dreaming, I recall the long wooden 'stick' and hooked end, though I have no knowledge of the hand pump (or that's my excuse for bad memory).

I do know that often we would pick up a 46 stowed on a spare road in Sydney Yard for a Flyer, they only way we ever livened them up was with the 'stick'.

Personally, I hated doing it as being rather short, I would have a lot of sparks flying until the air took over, as I recall, the driver had to stay in the cab to activate the process.

The 46 class were a very interesting locomotive to work on, the coupled drive train with draw gear caused them to yaw a lot, in my time, as I recall, they were limited to 65mph (the track speed could be up to 70mph).

My Teditor's Tales on the Darling Downs Model Railway Club Inc. website has a sixteen part story of my career on the NSWGR's, 46's get a mention in there somewhere.

Website http://www.ddmrc.com.au

Go to Stories on the main page.
  gw0071 Deputy Commissioner

Great insight gents - thank you
  a6et Minister for Railways

The Special Pole mentioned was a long wood pole with a metal hook arrangement fitted at the end, this was named  by crews " The Hooked Stick".
Officially it was for the purpose of reaching up to the roof of the loco. to open a large knife switch on the roof near the Pantograph for the purpose of isolating the 1500 V from the loco if for some reason it was not possible to drop the Pantograph due to it welding itself to the contact wire or becoming caught up in the overhead wire or any other reason.
In reality this device was used frequently for the purpose of manually lifting and then holding the Pantograph against the overhead contact wire, when there was no stored air available to raise the Panto.  This was to allow the 1500 V Compressors to run, and when enough pressure built up and to then supply air for the Panto. to stay raised. A manually operated large hand pump was provided but this was very exhausting and difficult to use as in many cases there were so many air leaks in the system that it was difficult to manually raise enough air pressure to overcome these leaks and still have enough pressure to raise the Panto.  This procedure was unofficial but a blind eye was turned to it as many a train delay or loco. failure would have occurred if it was not performed by the crew. It was not without it's risks and danger and was not something recommended in wet weather, ( holding this long wood pole up to the Panto. and holding it against the !500 V overhead.)  The pole itself was carried on a series of hooks on the inside roof of the passageway from the No. 1 end cab and to remove it for use outside the loco was quiet difficult as it had to be manipulated through the open side drivers cab window as the drivers side door opened inward and prevented it's passage directly out of the cab.
The reason I have elaborated on this is to inform those who may not be aware that the same  " Hooked Stick " was used on the " U Boat "  Single Deck Inter - Urbans  but in their case was " visible for all to see " as it was fitted on brackets along the edge of the black painted frame or side sill below the stainless steel fluting  on the  " U Boat " motor cars.  The provision of this device on the I. U. cars was for the same official purpose as it was for the 46 class locos, but as the I. U. cars had at least two motor cars, each with a manual pump as well as a Panto. air storage reservoir, ( and of course three or four motor cars if in a 6 or 8 car set) there was far less need to use this device for it's more common unofficial use to raise the Pantograph,  and they were progressively removed from these cars. Those modelling the " U Boats " in their earlier years of operating should have a representation of the " Hooked Stick" fitted to the side of the frame to be prototypical.
"Sydney Yard"


The turning of a blind eye was pretty well official, as a T/E qualified on the days we did deisel ground instruction we also did a morning on the 46cl. 7100 was an Eveliegh engine at the time & located for the Flemo car shed shunter, so I never go on it until it ended up at Delec & spent time running on Glenlee & Campbelltown coal trains.

During the 46cl prep instructions we were actually shown how to remove the pole, which was referred to as a Panto stick by the inspector, instructed also that the metal head had to face the cab end on the rack, lift up & through the cab & drivers window & lower to the ground, NEVER drop it out the window as the head would break off.

This particular inspector who I had on 38cl firing trials delighted in making every learning exercise as realistic, make that hard as possible, ensuring the panto's were down & he drained all the air out of the MR.  He pointed to the spot under the contact bars where to place the pole, then rest it against the top edge of the side of the loco, keep it straight & push up to the o/head, you knew when contact was made when a load crack took place, & the compressor started up.  With that, you lowered the rod, & it was the next fellows turn.

The key to ensuring they did not lose air was in the sequence of filling the specific reservoir for the panto raise, & not forgetting to drop the solinoid brass weight at the base of it, only shutting the cocks when you could hear no more air flowing & IIIRC there was an air gauge to indicate it was full or empty.

Ted, the hand pump was over the other side of the compressors in a cavity under the the panto tank, you had to climb over the compressors to get to the hand pump.

For me, they should have been restricted to 50mph, & I believe in the later or last years of their life, they were downgraded in speed & were banned from working passenger trains, especially on the short north owing to the ride & roughness of them.  Personally I always thought they looked worse when seen from the outside than actually in the cab, which was bad enough.
  Booly Junior Train Controller

The 421's can't be that far off , got back to work this morning after holiday's and found a email & Invoice dated 31st Dec.
  brissim Chief Train Controller

The 421's can't be that far off , got back to work this morning after holiday's and found a email & Invoice dated 31st Dec.
Booly
Not necessarily so. I also got my 421 invoice on that date despite ordering them several months previously. Unfortunately its becoming a somewhat familiar trend with Auscision recently that it takes some time for them to get around to issuing invoices.

To the best of my understanding we wont be seeing the 421s until after CNY - ie March/April at the earliest.

Tony
  gw0071 Deputy Commissioner

The Auscision process has changed over the past couple of months due to a significant team member being absent on maternity leave. My last order wasn't acknowledge with a PDF invoice as usual. No big deal. The items arrived. Faith and trust remains highly intact
  hot64x Station Staff

Hi all

What decoders with sound files are available for the 46 & 86 class?

I'm thinking it might only be a generic sound avail.

Regards
Mick K
  standard gauge Station Master

Blog and facebook update

photos of the X class

45 class due next week. $250 price ends this weekend

Both Marlboro liveried 45s have now sold out. 45-23 & 45-24.
  meh Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
Two things I'm curious about with the 45s now:

  • How many will be left when they arrive.
  • What (if any) surprise liveries will be available.

Same goes with the X class; will they make the latter versions available as well... Time will tell.

Glad I've got 4520 and 4528 locked in (4520 more so).
  Fairlight Station Master

Location: Always watching....
Good to see the 45's are moving. I thought the candy ones would of gone first.

Auscision are going to have a healthy response when ( and if they ever ) announce a rerun for this and the 422's. I still can't believe the reverse 422's are still in stock! Just love that scheme on these loco's.

Bring on the 46's!!
  John_Bushell Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisbane
Not trying to promote one supplier, but just to inform you what is out there.  This is from http://www.dccsound.com/ on the Home Page.

"In anticipation of Auscision's 2015 release, we've recorded 45s1. The sound project features the familiar chug of the 12-251C prime mover and WABCo Pneuphonic airhorns as fitted to many of the Goodwin built ALCos.  
Auscision's 45 class will be built around ESU's 21-MTC LokSound decoder and 16x35mm speaker, available from DCCSound. We've tested the pre-production sample, so your decoder will come specifically calibrated to suit Auscision's model, for creamy smooth, low speed motor control."
  ed31880 Train Controller

Not necessarily so. I also got my 421 invoice on that date despite ordering them several months previously. Unfortunately its becoming a somewhat familiar trend with Auscision recently that it takes some time for them to get around to issuing invoices.

To the best of my understanding we wont be seeing the 421s until after CNY - ie March/April at the earliest.

Tony
brissim
one wonders why it has to take so long to be issued an invoice for purchases.  i would have thought that they would generate an invoice and send it at the same time they process your payment.  They seem to be relatively quick to deduct the money from customer accounts yet slow to forward an invoice.  the invoices for my last 3 purchases have averaged about 6 weeks between when payment is made and when i receive the invoice.
  gw0071 Deputy Commissioner

I am not about to argue the merit of one man's expectations over another's however, a late invoice is surely better than the soup Nazi-esque business model of pay now - ask no questions or else. If you're not familiar with the customer relation style of the later then you obviously haven't been around long

As I previously stated, when Mel was about the order process ran like clockwork. It hasn't really deteriorated a great deal since she's taken leave. What do you expect, a personal on-air thank you from Kochie?

Relax - allegedly these people have day jobs
  DQ2004 Chief Commissioner

Location: Hobart -where the rain has lumps in it
I agree, an invoice at some random point in time is far better than no invoice at all.

I'm sure I don't need to name those model companies that don't do this.

As previously stated by others and repeated many times, receiving an invoice has nothing to do whatsoever with when a model will arrive.

Regards

Toby
  kingfisher Chief Train Controller

I agree, an invoice at some random point in time is far better than no invoice at all.

I'm sure I don't need to name those that don't do this.

As previously stated by others and repeated many times, receiving an invoice has nothing to do whatsoever with when a model will arrive.

Regards

Toby
DQ2004
The important thing with any of them is to check you credit card to make sure the money has at least been debited and if it hasn't after a reasonably short period then that is the time to be concerned.
  meh Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
My experience of this is sending an order through (via snail mail) on a Monday and having the funds drawn from the credit card on the Wednesday afternoon, and receiving an invoice in 6 weeks time.

Whilst it would be nicer to have an invoice immediately, history shows that they always follow it up and send it out. Again it's a second job to these guys and I'm sure that their systems ensure tracking peoples orders is easy to follow-up and send invoices out weeks after payment has been made.

In any case it hasn't and wont stop me pre-ordering.

On another topic; I hope to hear about (and see painted samples of) the XPT soon. Maybe the Auscision team should do a news update rather than a short blog post to communicate about all their projects.
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
The Auscision process has changed over the past couple of months due to a significant team member being absent on maternity leave. My last order wasn't acknowledge with a PDF invoice as usual. No big deal. The items arrived. Faith and trust remains highly intact
gw0071
My bolding by the way but unless you expect her to send out invoices while giving birth you are expecting a lot. One can just see her lying there and the doctor say's PUSH and while doing that making out Invoices on a computer. Yes people have things called private lives! So all she has done most probably is sent them out as soon as she was able to, so a bit late but better than never though!

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