Tasmanian rail speed record

 
  Krel4203 Locomotive Driver

Does anyone know what the Tasmanian rail speed record is and when it was set?
I seem to recall something about an R class pacific doing a speed run but have no evidence.

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  DRR_Fireman Deputy Commissioner

Location: -
I've heard an anecdote of an 830 doing 100km/h (maybe even 110?) on the Latrobe deviation with an empty ballast train before the deviation was officially opened
  Electric C Junior Train Controller

Location: The Shed - land of junk, smoke and wonder
Didn't one of the Garret M's do 80 miles/hour (about 130km/hour)  at one stage.
  Graham4405 Minister for Railways

Location: Dalby Qld
Didn't one of the Garret M's do 80 miles/hour (about 130km/hour)  at one stage.
Electric C
From Wikipedia: M1 set a Garratt world speed record of 55 mph (88 km/h) in 1912

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Tasmanian_locomotives
  Electric C Junior Train Controller

Location: The Shed - land of junk, smoke and wonder
There's my thought answered! The R's where faster then the M's wasn't they?
  BP4417 Deputy Commissioner

Location: Launceston, Tasmania
Does anyone know what the Tasmanian rail speed record is and when it was set?
I seem to recall something about an R class pacific doing a speed run but have no evidence.
Krel4203
When the Don Railway had an appointed TGR driver to oversee driver and fireman training he recalled the Sentinel Railcars doing over 60 mph and easily on ash ballast. (97 kph). Have been a fireman on a steam loco doing 80 kph.
  br30453 Chief Train Controller

From Wikipedia: M1 set a Garratt world speed record of 55 mph (88 km/h) in 1912

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Tasmanian_locomotives

The Algerian Garratts were designed for an operating speed of 120 km/h.


On was tested in 1937 on the Nord Railway in France.

On one trip, BT 11 accelerated a 568-tonne train up Survilliers bank, which it topped at 119 km/h, recording an output of 2900 dbhp. On 23 March, on a high-speed run to Calais, the loco attained 135 km/h on the downgrade between La Faloise and Ailly-sur-Noye, an unofficial record for an articulated locomotive, which has never been equalled.

Link to article: http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/peclegg/sncf/articles/article_2007_01.html

QR Garratts have run up to speeds of 100 km/h.


Moral of the story: Don't believe all that you read on wikipedia.
  Graham4405 Minister for Railways

Location: Dalby Qld
Moral of the story: Don't believe all that you read on wikipedia.
br30453
Which is why when I post anything from Wikipedia I always state it as such so that the reader can draw his/her own conclusions or do further research as they see fit.
  splod Junior Train Controller

Location: Hobart, TAS
Moral of the story: Don't believe all that you read on wikipedia.
br30453
Well when I went to school, 1912 was considerably before 1937 - around 25 years in fact.  So isn't it conceivable that both statements are correct, with the M setting the record in 1912, which was then bettered in 1937 (and possibly at other times in the intervening years as well)?

I'm not advocating that one should believe everything on Wikipedia - just pointing out that this isn't necessarily an example to support that advice.
  12CSVT Chief Commissioner

Location: Drowning in accreditation red tape!
As for the original question, apocryphal stories from numerous TGR drivers claim some truly frightening speeds achieved on 'M' class pacifics in the 1960's, but as they were unofficial (and probably highly illegal), the true Tas speed record will probably never be known.
  michaelgreenhill Administrator That's Numberwang!

Location: Melbourne
...but as they were unofficial (and probably highly illegal), the true Tas speed record will probably never be known.
12CSVT
Not even worth mentioning, really. It can't be a record if it wasn't recorded.

[/pedant]
  12CSVT Chief Commissioner

Location: Drowning in accreditation red tape!
Oh, they were recorded alright (by the drivers concerned), but not for public consumption!

As for any official record - probably isn't such a thing. Closest would be the fastest section on the fastest historical scheduled service.  Whatever that is - and that would take researching reams of old Annual Reports or Weekly & Special Train Notices.
  BP4417 Deputy Commissioner

Location: Launceston, Tasmania
Oh, they were recorded alright (by the drivers concerned), but not for public consumption!

As for any official record - probably isn't such a thing. Closest would be the fastest section on the fastest historical scheduled service.  Whatever that is - and that would take researching reams of old Annual Reports or Weekly & Special Train Notices.
12CSVT
The Emu Bay, Mt Lyell trains transferring the rescue equipment during the Mt Lyell Fire would have to be one of the quickest compared to scheduled timetable.
  BertR Station Master

The Emu Bay, Mt Lyell trains transferring the rescue equipment during the Mt Lyell Fire would have to be one of the quickest compared to scheduled timetable.
BP4417
There are plenty of "unofficial" records from various lines. You'd be surprised what a ZA could do with 10 empty QF's when the speedo tape ran out
  theesp Train Controller

The only records you'll get these days is the slowest section time.
  12CSVT Chief Commissioner

Location: Drowning in accreditation red tape!
The only records you'll get these days is the slowest section time.
theesp
Do you mean out on the track or in HQ?? Wink

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