ANZAC Day 2016 and thoughts for fallen diggers

 
  BigBoy2015 Station Master

I wanted to acknowledge ANZAC Day and suggest we all take a moment to remember our fallen soliders from all the wars.

Remember this from school days (not so long ago) turned by mind to wondering how much the railways from all states in this land played in moving our troops around and assisting in the war effort.

I read recently trains would have carried soliders from all parts of the land to a central location for trains and then they would have carried them to the port.  Our first Anzacs left our shores in 1914 (i think) from Esperance in WA so how would the troops have got there as the trans Australia railway had not yet been completed.

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  GeoffreyHansen Minister for Railways

Location: In a FAM sleeper
To all of our former and current defence personnel have a great day. To those past Lest We Forget.

I guess ships for the war would have left from several ports including Esperance. Also there were several breaks of gauge back then.

I remember my grand-uncle talking about travelling on the North Australia railway during World War II.
  br30453 Chief Train Controller

To all of our former and current defence personnel have a great day. To those past Lest We Forget.

I guess ships for the war would have left from several ports including Esperance. Also there were several breaks of gauge back then.

I remember my grand-uncle talking about travelling on the North Australia railway during World War II.
GeoffreyHansen
A search of the internet reveals that troops leaving from all of the state capitals and meetin up at Albany in Western Australia.

One of interest:
Jack Foot sailed from Melbourne for Egypt on the troop ship HMAT Benalla on 19 October, 1914. The transport had an average cruising speed of 14 knots or 25.92 kmph. The ship was owned by the P&O SN Co based in London and leased out for service by the Commonwealth from the wars beginning up until the 6th of August 1917. The ship was fitted out with accommodation designed to comfortably hold 50 officers and 1200 other ranks. Originally this first convoy was to sail directly to London and the troops were to encamp on the Salisbury Plain. However because of the poor weather conditions there it was decided to send the troops to Egypt.
Jack Foott while on his voyage to the middle east onboard the Benalla, told his Aunt Annie via postcard that he was ‘having a good trip across.’ This was however not the full story. HMAT Benalla joined the first convoy or flotilla of 38 Australian and New Zealand ships and four cruisers that left from Albany, Western Australia, on November 1.
[color=#000000][size=3][font=Times New Roman]http://www.murphyswar.com.au/ww1-troop-ships-across-the-indian-ocean/[/font][/size][/color]





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