Questions that you've always been too embarrassed to ask

 
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Hi all.  I don't think this is worthy of a new thread on it's own!

- What is the purpose of the extra pieces of rail in the middle of the tracks at various locations on a stretch? Reinforcement of some kind?
- Does this have a name?
- What is that tiny little elevated platform used for?  They seem to be at every one of those.

An example is in the picture here - grainy picture taken from a screenshot of a video from the Regional Rail Link between West Werribee Junction and Southern Cross Station in Victoria from youtube.

Jason Sutherland
do you have a link to the youtube video?

Looks like a small bridge to me.
The inner rails are called "check rails" or guard rails https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guard_rails_(railroad)
The 'platform' is most likely  walkway for maintenance workers over the bridge

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  Jason Sutherland Beginner

Thanks Pressman, that is good info!

The screen shot is at the 32 second mark of this video, although there's plenty of other instances of the inner rails.  Or "check rails" as I now know them to be - thank you!!

And now that I review it again, they do appear to be mostly at places where there is a bridge of some kind, or perhaps an underpass for livestock etc??



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uytp5ohVWRI
  MetroFemme Assistant Commissioner

Are we limited to railway only questions?
  Graham4405 The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Dalby Qld
Are we limited to railway only questions?
MetroFemme
As the General forum comes under the heading of "Australian Railway News", I'd hazard a guess that this thread should be limited to Australian Railway questions.

Questions of other than a railway nature could be posed in the relevant forum.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Could the XPT (say double ended with 4 cars in middle) or XPL (2-3 car set) technically get to Oberon (by rail), assuming the track was certified/open and on original alignment?
  QSB6.7 Chief Train Controller

Location: Going off the rails on a crazy train.
Looks like  back to the  optometrist  for a  check up .  Fridge containers  each have their own power plant  for the compressor on each  container at the B end , sometimes  a flat wagon is fitted with a standalone gen set which supplies power to the wagons either side which have fridge containers as  loading ,  End of train markers are powered by internal batteries on each BOG , Internal carriage lighting  for the IP etc is supplied  by  the power car at  the end of the train usually fitted with 3 gen sets with 2 in use at any time  the third as a  spare . On commuter trains the lighting is provided by a inverter with usually  a inverter supplying 2 cars .

From one who uses his eyes to work out why & where for .

 Wally . Retired  driver with over 30 years of service .
wally-wowser1
Not all containers have their own power unit.
Many still need external power.
  Lockspike Chief Commissioner

Hi all.  I don't think this is worthy of a new thread on it's own!

- What is the purpose of the extra pieces of rail in the middle of the tracks at various locations on a stretch? Reinforcement of some kind?
- Does this have a name?
- What is that tiny little elevated platform used for?  They seem to be at every one of those.

An example is in the picture here - grainy picture taken from a screenshot of a video from the Regional Rail Link between West Werribee Junction and Southern Cross Station in Victoria from youtube.

do you have a link to the youtube video?

Looks like a small bridge to me.
The inner rails are called "check rails" or guard rails https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guard_rails_(railroad)
The 'platform' is most likely  walkway for maintenance workers over the bridge
Pressman
The inner rails are most definately guard rails. Guard rails are used to keep derailed wheels in line with the track at locations where a wayward excursion into the dirt is extremely undesirable, such as on a bridge. Guard rails are designed NOT to contact the wheel in the course of normal running, being typically 100-200 mm away.

Check rails are used to reduce the risk of a wheel derailing where there is increased likelihood of this, such as in turnouts and on very sharp curves. Check rails are closer to the running rail and are designed to make contact with the back of the wheel flange, so literally 'checking' the wheel. The NSW stg gauge check rail gap is 44mm +- 3.

Confusion largely stems from studying american practice, where they refer to check rails as guard rails.

The 'platform' or walkway on the side of the bridge is at or near rail height and is to allow train crew to detrain and /or walk alongside their train in an emergency situation.
  Lockspike Chief Commissioner

Could the XPT (say double ended with 4 cars in middle) or XPL (2-3 car set) technically get to Oberon (by rail), assuming the track was certified/open and on original alignment?
RTT_Rules
I seem to remember an XPT design specification was that a single loco had to be able to lift 4 cars from a standing start on a 1 in 30 grade (can others confirm this?), so yes, two locos and 4 cars would make it to Oberon. I'd be surprised if it would be a problem for Explorers.
  TheLummox Beginner

Could the XPT (say double ended with 4 cars in middle) or XPL (2-3 car set) technically get to Oberon (by rail), assuming the track was certified/open and on original alignment?
I seem to remember an XPT design specification was that a single loco had to be able to lift 4 cars from a standing start on a 1 in 30 grade (can others confirm this?), so yes, two locos and 4 cars would make it to Oberon. I'd be surprised if it would be a problem for Explorers.
Lockspike
Over the years, CPH railmotors, 44,45 and 49 class locomotives all ventured to Oberon, giving you some idea of the wide spread of motive power used on the line. The greatest rolling stock limitation on the line has been the radius of the curves. There are a number of locations where the line was ballasted and a check rail fitted due the tightness. 19 class locos were used as the short wheel base arrangement (0-6-0) could cope with the curves. Most bogie stock would have no trouble. Axle loads are the least of the limitations up there as you can see by the range of classes that worked the hill. The biggest limitation on freight was the down hill grade, which limited trains to 200 tons and meant wagon brakes being wound on for part of the trip down to Carlwood.
  georges Chief Train Controller

Why do some A Sets of Sydney Trains appear to have a small short panel missing at each end? The panel fits immediately under the floor level.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Could the XPT (say double ended with 4 cars in middle) or XPL (2-3 car set) technically get to Oberon (by rail), assuming the track was certified/open and on original alignment?
I seem to remember an XPT design specification was that a single loco had to be able to lift 4 cars from a standing start on a 1 in 30 grade (can others confirm this?), so yes, two locos and 4 cars would make it to Oberon. I'd be surprised if it would be a problem for Explorers.
Over the years, CPH railmotors, 44,45 and 49 class locomotives all ventured to Oberon, giving you some idea of the wide spread of motive power used on the line. The greatest rolling stock limitation on the line has been the radius of the curves. There are a number of locations where the line was ballasted and a check rail fitted due the tightness. 19 class locos were used as the short wheel base arrangement (0-6-0) could cope with the curves. Most bogie stock would have no trouble. Axle loads are the least of the limitations up there as you can see by the range of classes that worked the hill. The biggest limitation on freight was the down hill grade, which limited trains to 200 tons and meant wagon brakes being wound on for part of the trip down to Carlwood.
TheLummox
Thanks guys,
Just part of my Fantasy Railway should OTHR ever get the line reopened. They could celebrate with a XPT or XPL service from Sydney (ignore the realities of who pays)
  gordon_s1942 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Tablelands of NSW
The biggest problem encounter on the Oberon line were the sharp curves more than anything else.
One time the HCX combo B/V had to be sent away for an overhaul and a FS carriage was sent to replace it.
For some reason two days in a row on the return back from Oberon, the buffers on the FS crossed over and were partially ripped off the beam.
I came here in this time of year in 1963 and the 49 class had replaced the 19 class Steam engine with the Train now starting from Wallerawang each day and returning there each night it ran.
The 49 class had a plate indicating it belonged to PARKES where it returned each weekend with another replacing it for the next week.
From then until the service was discontinued, I cant ever remember ANY form of Rail Motor running from Tarana to Oberon.
The same applies to a 44 class as they were as rare as hens teeth but the 45 class did when they had a major stock lift one weekend and needed its power to haul the bigger loads.
  theanimal Chief Commissioner

Looks like  back to the  optometrist  for a  check up .  Fridge containers  each have their own power plant  for the compressor on each  container at the B end , sometimes  a flat wagon is fitted with a standalone gen set which supplies power to the wagons either side which have fridge containers as  loading ,  End of train markers are powered by internal batteries on each BOG , Internal carriage lighting  for the IP etc is supplied  by  the power car at  the end of the train usually fitted with 3 gen sets with 2 in use at any time  the third as a  spare . On commuter trains the lighting is provided by a inverter with usually  a inverter supplying 2 cars .

From one who uses his eyes to work out why & where for .

 Wally . Retired  driver with over 30 years of service .
Not all containers have their own power unit.
Many still need external power.
QSB6.7
2 points,

1.  the original poster referred to fridge containers

2. he refers to another method of how external power can and is provided enroute via static generators other than that, how is this external power you refer to provided?
  Jason Sutherland Beginner

The inner rails are most definately guard rails. Guard rails are used to keep derailed wheels in line with the track at locations where a wayward excursion into the dirt is extremely undesirable, such as on a bridge. Guard rails are designed NOT to contact the wheel in the course of normal running, being typically 100-200 mm away.

Check rails are used to reduce the risk of a wheel derailing where there is increased likelihood of this, such as in turnouts and on very sharp curves. Check rails are closer to the running rail and are designed to make contact with the back of the wheel flange, so literally 'checking' the wheel. The NSW stg gauge check rail gap is 44mm +- 3.

Confusion largely stems from studying american practice, where they refer to check rails as guard rails.

The 'platform' or walkway on the side of the bridge is at or near rail height and is to allow train crew to detrain and /or walk alongside their train in an emergency situation.
Lockspike
That is such a fantastic and informative reply, thank you so much! Smile
  wally-wowser1 Train Controller

Location: overlooking the Mt vic washaway on Soldiers Pinch
sometimes  a flat wagon is fitted with a standalone gen set which supplies power to the wagons either side which have fridge containers as  loading .


  Not sure what  the problem is but I can understand what I wrote.
  gordon_s1942 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Tablelands of NSW
Refrigerated Containers appear to come either with their own 'saddle back' refrigerant unit or rely on being plugged into a stand alone power source.
I was watching one of those shows on the Discovery channel and it showed the ships crew plugging in a refrigerated Container while it was on board but I cant remember if it had its own power unit which was turned off while at Sea or needed to be connected to a separate power source all the time.
If you had a ship with some 1800 containers on board, refueling them while at Sea would not be very practicable so I would presume all (Refrigerated) come with the option of being plugged into a Power Source during the voyage.
  wurx Lithgovian Ambassador-at-Large

Location: The mystical lost principality of Daptovia
The inner rails are most definately guard rails. Guard rails are used to keep derailed wheels in line with the track at locations where a wayward excursion into the dirt is extremely undesirable, such as on a bridge. Guard rails are designed NOT to contact the wheel in the course of normal running, being typically 100-200 mm away.

Check rails are used to reduce the risk of a wheel derailing where there is increased likelihood of this, such as in turnouts and on very sharp curves. Check rails are closer to the running rail and are designed to make contact with the back of the wheel flange, so literally 'checking' the wheel. The NSW stg gauge check rail gap is 44mm +- 3.

Confusion largely stems from studying american practice, where they refer to check rails as guard rails.

The 'platform' or walkway on the side of the bridge is at or near rail height and is to allow train crew to detrain and /or walk alongside their train in an emergency situation.
That is such a fantastic and informative reply, thank you so much! Smile
Jason Sutherland
They've been around for a long time too. Here's some check/guard rails on an underline bridge at Maclaughlin on one of the abandoned portions of the Bombala line. This section of the line (Nimmitabel-Bombala) dates from 1921; the photos date from August 2009.

http://s138.photobucket.com/user/pixwurx/media/Bombala%20line/Maclaughlin/IMG_0828c.jpg.html

http://s138.photobucket.com/user/pixwurx/media/Bombala%20line/Maclaughlin/IMG_0830c.jpg.html
  N463 Locomotive Driver

I've seen the writing "½SC 10FT" painted on the face of some platforms (Bendigo is one example).

I presume the 10FT part means 10 Feet, but what does the rest of this mean?

N463
  Matruck Junior Train Controller

Location: Lilliput,Victoria
I was reading an article about a coal terminal in Kentucky in the US that blend's the coal before being either sent elsewhere by train or onto barge's to be shipped down river and i was wondering if we also do that out here in the Hunter Valley NSW ?.
This terminal i was reading about can blend up to 4 different type's of coal so it got me to thinking i have not read or heard about blending coal before transshipping not that i'm familiar with the coal industry out here.
Cheers Mick.
  gordon_s1942 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Tablelands of NSW
Coal aint Coal, even from the same Pitt and they most certainly try to meet to buyers needs to ensure a sale.

'Newcastle' coal was always looked on by my area (Western Coalfields) as near to being 'PURE' as some of the grades mined here are very poor BUT surprisingly, its got a high resale value because it is considered good quality 'Steaming Coal!!!, so work that out.
Although nothing to do with 'price of Coal' the Mines also try to crush their coal in a size the buyer wants as well.
Recently an article appeared about the Manildra Group (well know Wheat/Grain miller) applying for permission to open an open cut to mine this particular coal and crush it to very specific 'nugget' size they want for their boilers.

Both the ash content and thermal generation is also part of the requirements too.
  Matruck Junior Train Controller

Location: Lilliput,Victoria
Thanks Gordon but the US actually mix their coal well i think that is what blending mean's so i just wondered if we did the same. And going by your reply out here we do what the customer requires so i'd imagine it might blended sum where.
Cheers Mick.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
New Question:-  What's the difference between trams and light rail?
  tazzer96 Deputy Commissioner

New Question:-  What's the difference between trams and light rail?
Valvegear
While there is probably a dictionary definition somewhere. In general trams run on city streets alongside and with cars (cars sharing the same lane as trams).  They have frequent stops but there isn't much to the stop, only a small raise, some information boards etc.  

Light rail is generally all on its on reserved tracks, have traffic light priority.  They often run on non road corridors, have less frequent stops, stations have a bit more to them. very little interaction with cars.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
New Question:-  What's the difference between trams and light rail?
Valvegear
It's the old story.

If you have a problem or if you wish to appear to be doing something you either change its name or dream up a double barrel term to rename a simple term and describe what it is you are doing. Alternatively, you can simply paint it another colour.

In this case tram = light rail.

Take the West Coburg tram to Abbotsford Street /Flemington Road intersection then catch the light rail to Brunswick Road then the tram again to Bell Street. Same rail mounted vehicle all the way.!!!!!

Same situation with the Port Melbourne and St Kilda trams - change names half way.

If people put the same effort into actually doing something that they put into spin we would be a lot better off on one hand or the unemployment rate would be a lot higher on the other.
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Here on the Gold Coast, the official website mixes the terms light rail vehicle and tram (quote) Handover of the Depot to KDR Gold Coast and delivery of the first trams occurred in 2013. The balance of the trams were delivered early in 2014 enabling the team of light rail vehicle drivers to be trained ready to commence operations in mid-2014. Today there are more than 150 employees of whom the majority are LRV drivers and customer facing employees.(end quote)

http://ridetheg.com.au/our-history/

The freight transporters tend to use the term tram. Some pass beside public roads and some through private property. The Mossman sugar tram goes down the middle of the public road in town.

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