Regauging Victoria's railways (!)

 
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

Can anyone provide the exact measurements of the flange and tread on the BGv and SG in Victoria?
awsgc24
The V/Line wheels and NSW wheels are of different width - the Victorian ones are wider.

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  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
This sort of think would only work if the rollback could be done quickly and safely.  I doubt the achievement of either of these would be cost effective for the limited traffic that might be involved.
  Myrtone Chief Commissioner

Location: North Carlton, Melbourne, Victoria
The key point here is that converting between gauges differing by less than the width of the railhead is simply more complicated than converting between gauges differing by more than the width of standard rails. For example converting the Queensland railways from cape gauge to metre gauge would be more complicated than converting them to standard gauge. Cape gauge differs from metre gauge by less than the width of the railhead, while both differ from standard by more than the width of standard flat bottom rails, so three-rail dual gauge track is possible with standard rails, and leaves a wider gap than mixed Victorian and Standard gauge.
How complicated would conversion from Victorian to standard gauge be?
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rollbock
The Rollbock system will only work if the two gauges are sufficiently different, and clear the flanges and treads of the upper and lower wagons.
.
Assume that the flanges are say 1" thick.
Assume that the treads are say 3" thick.
Then 2 flanges and 2 treads take up 2x1 + 2x3 = 8".
In Spain, the difference between BGs and SG is 9.5" which is greater than 8", so it seems to work.
In Victoria, the difference between BGv and SG is 6.5" which is less than 8", which seems to leave insufficient room for Rollbock to work.

Can anyone provide the exact measurements of the flange and tread on the BGv and SG in Victoria?
awsgc24
Why bother ................
Upon reading the Wiki article you will find this "This method enables the Rollbock wagons to traverse curves as sharp as 15 m (49.2 ft) radius and, when fully loaded, they could be moved over narrow gauge tracks at a safe speed of 13 mph or 21 km/h"
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

Why bother ................  Upon reading the Wiki article you will find this "This method enables the Rollbock wagons to traverse curves as sharp as 15 m (49.2 ft) radius and, when fully loaded, they could be moved over narrow gauge tracks at a safe speed of 13 mph or 21 km/h"
Pressman
Yes, designed for gauges of between 600mm and metre gauge, mostly.
  Myrtone Chief Commissioner

Location: North Carlton, Melbourne, Victoria
True or false?
There would be a substantial gain in regauging Victoria's railways, both country services and Melbourne suburban, given conformity with interstate lines and those in New South Wales.

True or false?
Three-rail dual gauge track imposing a speed restriction and requiring narrow footed rails would complicate the conversion process.

True or false?
Regauging all these lines would mean shutting down nearly all of them for an extended period of time while the conversion is done, adding to the cost of equipment, such as buses, to provide the replacement service.
  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
True or false?
There would be a substantial gain in regauging Victoria's railways, both country services and Melbourne suburban, given conformity with interstate lines and those in New South Wales.

True or false?
Three-rail dual gauge track imposing a speed restriction and requiring narrow footed rails would complicate the conversion process.

True or false?
Regauging all these lines would mean shutting down nearly all of them for an extended period of time while the conversion is done, adding to the cost of equipment, such as buses, to provide the replacement service.
Myrtone

1. Depends.  Some lines yes, others no.  Country network where there is freight and low disruption costs its probably a yes.  The Metro, probably no, as the disruption cost would be huge.

2. True

3. True.

These are seemingly obvious answers though.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
True or false?
There would be a substantial gain in regauging Victoria's railways, both country services and Melbourne suburban, given conformity with interstate lines and those in New South Wales.

True or false?
Three-rail dual gauge track imposing a speed restriction and requiring narrow footed rails would complicate the conversion process.

True or false?
Regauging all these lines would mean shutting down nearly all of them for an extended period of time while the conversion is done, adding to the cost of equipment, such as buses, to provide the replacement service.

1. Depends.  Some lines yes, others no.  Country network where there is freight and low disruption costs its probably a yes.  The Metro, probably no, as the disruption cost would be huge.

2. True

3. True.

These are seemingly obvious answers though.
james.au
I'd have answered as False/True/True

The major drawbacks in conversion is the Disruption costs.
On the freight side, business will not wait during closures, they will seek alternatives, and once freight is lost to rail, getting it back is even harder.

On the passenger side the same applies, people will find alternative transport and gaining them back to rail will not be easy.
(An example of this is the closure of Trans Adelaide's Noarlunga line for electrification. Even with the opening of the Seaford extension, passenger numbers on the line took well over 12 months to return back to pre closure numbers)