German rail giant steps up 'Silk Road' freight to China

 

News article: German rail giant steps up 'Silk Road' freight to China

German state rail operator Deutsche Bahn said Thursday it planned to significantly ramp up cargo transport to China following a record year, using the world's longest train line in a modern-day revival of the Silk Road route.

  BigTrain2015 Junior Train Controller

How long before thia traffix starta to take nore gold ans shipping rates are lowered to compete?

German rail giant steps up 'Silk Road' freight to China

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  Bogong Chief Commissioner

Location: Tristan da Cunha
I'm surprised that there is much of a market for containerised rail freight between China and Germany. The trip by rail takes 12 to 16 days, only half that of sending the containers by sea from the overwhelmingly coastal Chinese centres of production.

Given that sending containers by rail is a lot more expensive than sending them by sea, why would companies bother? If something is urgent it can be air freighted in under 2 days, if not it can go by sea in a month.
  RTT_Rules The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Dubai UAE
How long before thia traffix starta to take nore gold ans shipping rates are lowered to compete?

German rail giant steps up 'Silk Road' freight to China
BigTrain2015
Would shipping rates are currently at record lows. The cost to move freight from India to Middle East is about $50/container or better. Cannot remember exact number but its dirt dirt dirt cheap.

But I still don't see how this rail route is more viable over shipping.
  Carnot Chief Commissioner

For some commodities such as cars and food products, rail can be a good alternative to marine freight - especially for the inland cities of China.  There's also a level of redundancy if there are typhoons in the South China Sea, potential naval blockades, traffic jams in the Suez Canal (although that's less of a problem since a major upgrade) etc.
  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
This might sound like a dumb question but is some cargo better moved by rail due to issues in its onboard management?  Im thinking oceanic factors like corrosion, and possibly excessive movement (i.e. swaying).  Not so much the latter but some things may not like excessive salt contact, though containers are probably pretty well sealed for that too I guess?

Other points, some cargo might just be a priority issue too (but not so much to be airfreighted).  Plus shorter transit times would reduce the value of inventory in transit, if that is something significant a company is managing.
  RTT_Rules The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Dubai UAE
This might sound like a dumb question but is some cargo better moved by rail due to issues in its onboard management?  Im thinking oceanic factors like corrosion, and possibly excessive movement (i.e. swaying).  Not so much the latter but some things may not like excessive salt contact, though containers are probably pretty well sealed for that too I guess?

Other points, some cargo might just be a priority issue too (but not so much to be airfreighted).  Plus shorter transit times would reduce the value of inventory in transit, if that is something significant a company is managing.
james.au
Corrosion not an issue for cars anymore and they are transported inside a car ship, not on the deck.

On the train the cars must be tied down more so than on a ship.
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

The application of this will be limited, as the most efficient method for this sort of distance* is a ship, not a series** of trains - even if that means taking it up a thousand or so kilometres to the port first.

Even if DB manage to get the volume transported up to the 100,000 TEU per year they want to get by 2020, that's still just a specialised niche operation as there are over 9 million TEU transported by ship from Asia to Europe every year

* yes, rail transport has an upper limit on its effective range, just like road does.
** it's not a direct train with just the locomotives being changed, it requires extra handling at a bunch of places along the way.
  RTT_Rules The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Dubai UAE
The application of this will be limited, as the most efficient method for this sort of distance* is a ship, not a series** of trains - even if that means taking it up a thousand or so kilometres to the port first.

Even if DB manage to get the volume transported up to the 100,000 TEU per year they want to get by 2020, that's still just a specialised niche operation as there are over 9 million TEU transported by ship from Asia to Europe every year

* yes, rail transport has an upper limit on its effective range, just like road does.
** it's not a direct train with just the locomotives being changed, it requires extra handling at a bunch of places along the way.
justapassenger
Could you imagine the time spent at many of the border crossings involved?
  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
Based on my experience as a passenger, allow approx a day each going China-Mongolia and Mongolia-Russia.

the Russian one was better, there was a little shop near the train station that sold vodka....
  mikado5910 Chief Train Controller

Location: Kurri Kurri NSW
But James, this traffic is moving by the southern route through the former Soviet republics. The article makes a good point regarding traffic to inland cities of China, reducing intermodal port transfers and then land transport from coast to destination.
  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
But James, this traffic is moving by the southern route through the former Soviet republics. The article makes a good point regarding traffic to inland cities of China, reducing intermodal port transfers and then land transport from coast to destination.
mikado5910

Yep I know, just adding something I thought might be interesting to the conversation!

Id expect freight would be quicker given its more predictable and less likely to behave like a person.
  CPH8 Station Master

But James, this traffic is moving by the southern route through the former Soviet republics. The article makes a good point regarding traffic to inland cities of China, reducing intermodal port transfers and then land transport from coast to destination.

Yep I know, just adding something I thought might be interesting to the conversation!

Id expect freight would be quicker given its more predictable and less likely to behave like a person.
james.au
But James, did you try the toilets at Nauski? The one in the park at least has a door, unlike the ones at the station.
  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
But James, this traffic is moving by the southern route through the former Soviet republics. The article makes a good point regarding traffic to inland cities of China, reducing intermodal port transfers and then land transport from coast to destination.

Yep I know, just adding something I thought might be interesting to the conversation!

Id expect freight would be quicker given its more predictable and less likely to behave like a person.
But James, did you try the toilets at Nauski? The one in the park at least has a door, unlike the ones at the station.
CPH8

I honestly do not remember what I did for toilet facilities in Nauski!  I remember the park, and some shops across from the platform.  But that is about it.  It was a bit of a fuzzy day tbh....Wink

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