3830 trials - September 1997

 
  Bevan Wall Deputy Commissioner

Its hard to believe that on this day twenty years ago, just before midnight on September 18th, 1997, 3830 crept out of Eveleigh to do if first light engine trial after undergoing a long and thorough restoration by the Powerhouse Museum team.
Later in September the loco hauled a small consist to Port Kembla and over the following couple of weeks performed heavy load trials on the Cockatoo Run.
Here is a compilation of scenes from my "3830" DVD.
Enjoy,
BW


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmfNG2bDipY&t=25s

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  apw5910 Deputy Commissioner

Location: Location: Location.
Thanks again, Bevan. Really like seeing your videos.

Anyone care to say just what is wrong with 3830? Or, for that matter, why main line steam in NSW doesn't seem to have any "staying power" any more?
  Bevan Wall Deputy Commissioner

Thanks again, Bevan. Really like seeing your videos.

Anyone care to say just what is wrong with 3830? Or, for that matter, why main line steam in NSW doesn't seem to have any "staying power" any more?
apw5910
To the best of my knowledge, there has not been a public explanation of what happened to cause the locomotive to be made a "static exhibit". What is known though is that after undergoing some repairs an independent inspector set and sealed the safety valves and certified the boiler as good to go. A trial was run on the loopline, but then a short time later the same inspector declared that the boiler was so badly damaged that the certificate had to be withdrawn. Changing priorities within the PHM determined that funds would not be made available to carry out the necessary repairs, and at this time THfNSW cannot fund the work either. An explanation from very reliable sources with the steam preservation community of what was done to cause such catastrophic damage did circulate, but without a public statement  to substantiate that explanation I would have to categorise it as rumour and thus am not prepared to elaborate. I'm grateful that 3830 was able to operate for eleven years  and provided us with many opportunities to record some spectacular sights and sounds of steam operation at its best, and on the tenth or twentieth anniversary of those events I'll release some video on Youtube to help keep the memories alive.
BW
  4206 Chief Commissioner

Location: Dorrigo yard
Thank you for sharing
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Interesting to note that the crews handled the loco gently on the first couple of runs, bedding in the bearings et al before the load trials.  Good crews are worth their weight in gold.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Some strange noises and steam blows evident. Some teething problems are to be expected which is the purpose of the test run(s), however.

There are some interesting comparisons/contrasts to be drawn between steam preservation in NSW when compared with Victoria but I have no in depth knowledge of either scene other than the apparently differing levels of success.
  Spinner5711 Train Controller

I rode teh first public trial run, in September 1996.  I timed it at 85 mph.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
I rode teh first public trial run, in September 1996.  I timed it at 85 mph.
"Spinner5711"
I suggest you get a better watch.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
I rode teh first public trial run, in September 1996.  I timed it at 85 mph.
Spinner5711
Not saying that what you say is incorrect but if it is correct the crew should be severely disciplined or sacked.

And we wonder how the boiler on 3830 was (allegedly) wrecked.
  neillfarmer Chief Train Controller

The boiler has suffered severe corrosion. When this happened is unclear. After the loco received it's boiler ticket it was given an acid clean, something that requires a great deal of expertise. When it returned from the trial run there were many boiler leaks and it's certificate revoked. Exploratory work done by NSWRM shows the boiler is in a pretty sorry state.
  neillfarmer Chief Train Controller

Some strange noises and steam blows evident. Some teething problems are to be expected which is the purpose of the test run(s), however.

There are some interesting comparisons/contrasts to be drawn between steam preservation in NSW when compared with Victoria but I have no in depth knowledge of either scene other than the apparently differing levels of success.
YM-Mundrabilla
I think the difference lies in the final years of steam in NSW and Victoria. The 38s were worked hard right up to their withdrawals, whereas many of the Rs spent long periods in storage. The R boilers were about 10 years younger than the hard worked 38s. Although the 38 boilers are all getting on the rebuilt 36 class with their much younger boilers are still good to go.
Neill Farmer
  TheFish Chief Train Controller

Location: Pyongyang
The boiler has suffered severe corrosion. When this happened is unclear. After the loco received it's boiler ticket it was given an acid clean, something that requires a great deal of expertise. When it returned from the trial run there were many boiler leaks and it's certificate revoked. Exploratory work done by NSWRM shows the boiler is in a pretty sorry state.
neillfarmer

It really surprises me that anyone would attempt an acid washout.  With modern water supplies, closely monitored water treatment, regular washouts (with pressure boosted water) and proper storage when out of service there should be absolutely no need.  The risks are too great and if proper practices are followed any hard scale build-up should be able to be dealt with when the boiler undergoes its ten-yearly rebuild.

I am assuming the boiler hasn't been lifted since the 1990's and frankly its corner-cutting not to.
  NSWGR 3827 Deputy Commissioner

Location: South of the Border
There seems to be a lot of rumours and speculation but little else, there are some important questions that has to be asked:

Why was the decision made to acid wash, this is usually done to remove severe build up of scale, so what was found beforehand? We can deduce from this that there was a lot of scale. If this was the case the Water treatment being used was almost totally ineffective.


If it was full of scale once it was removed by the acid wash this could quite likely reveal significant corrosion not detectable beforehand.  Once again if corrosion was found after removal of scale deposits the Water Treatment was totally ineffective.

Plenty of locomotive Boilers have been acid washed in the past with no ill effects, some that readily come to mind are SRV's D3 658, 3801 (when first moved to the RTM) and PRR's SMC1, so it is not fatal to a loco Boiler to use this process.

Not having seen it personally I can only speculate like others, but I would suspect there was significant scale deposit bad enough to warrant an acid wash (maybe asked for by the Boiler Inspector) and once this was removed it revealed significant corrosion.  Scale deposits may also have been blocking up the leaks mentioned in one post earlier.
  SydneyCider Chief Train Controller

Thanks for sharing your awesome videos Bevan! Smile

As for 3830. Someone just asked a question about it on the THNSW facebook page and this was the reply:-

"Thanks for the question. Once 3801 is completed, 3830 will be a strong contender as our next restoration project. This will however be dependent on funding and further discussion with the locomotive's owner the Powerhouse Museum."

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