Dining cars in South Australia

 
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
were dining cars ever used on the SAR or CR in South Australia ?

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  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Dining cars were provided on all CR passenger trains.
  allan Chief Commissioner

Adelaide ran on the Overland for a short while, but sit-down meals were generally made available off-train. I know of no other true dining cars on the SAR before the IP.
  M636C Minister for Railways

SAR had the "Cafeteria Car" on the East West Express from 1949 until Standard gauge reached Adelaide from Crystal Brook.

The car is preserved at the NRM. Details are on the Comrails website.

It had tables and meals were served at your table. You ordered at a buffet counter and could get light refreshments as well to eat in the car or take away but meals were provided. It is as much a dining car as the VR and NSWGR 27 seat buffet cars which also served full meals.

Bluebirds had tiny buffets added in the 1970s and food was served at your seat (because there was no room to do anything else.)

Peter
  Trainplanner Chief Commissioner

Location: Along the Line
Yes enjoyed several meals on the E-W Express.   It was quite a nice train with those wonderful smooth riding sitting cars and the cafe-diner.
  x31 Chief Commissioner

Location: gallifrey
Yes enjoyed several meals on the E-W Express.   It was quite a nice train with those wonderful smooth riding sitting cars and the cafe-diner.
Trainplanner

What was the East/West Express?
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Yes enjoyed several meals on the E-W Express.   It was quite a nice train with those wonderful smooth riding sitting cars and the cafe-diner.

What was the East/West Express?
x31
The Easy-West was the train that connected between Adelaide and East thereof and the Trans-Australian at Port Pirie Junction.

It was a pleasant and comfortable train but always seemed painfully slow, perhaps in anticipation of the forthcoming luxury of the Trans ??
  Trainplanner Chief Commissioner

Location: Along the Line
That's true.  Very sedate
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Adelaide ran on the Overland for a short while, but sit-down meals were generally made available off-train. I know of no other true dining cars on the SAR before the IP.
allan
Westbound passengers ex the Overland from Melbourne for Perth and eastbound passengers ex Perth for Melbourne received lunch/dinner, respectively, in the Dining Room at the Adelaide Station. These meals were magnificent albeit back in the days, of course! Smile
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

Yes enjoyed several meals on the E-W Express.   It was quite a nice train with those wonderful smooth riding sitting cars and the cafe-diner.

What was the East/West Express?
x31
The Adelaide-Port Pirie connection to the Trams-Australian and Indian-Pacific trains. Departed Adelaide at 12:30 (so offered a connection off the Overland from Melbourne), the return left Port Pirie Junction at 2pm with an arrival at Adelaide at 5:15pm, again in the for the Overland. Interestingly, the 1964 SAR public timetable describes the westbound train as the "Perth Express" whereas the WTT says "Express Passenger".
  x31 Chief Commissioner

Location: gallifrey
Good discussion but could there have been a dining car on the Mount Gambier at one point?
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

It was a pleasant and comfortable train but always seemed painfully slow, perhaps in anticipation of the forthcoming luxury of the Trans ??
YM-Mundrabilla
The low speed of the route would be why AN realigned ten curves as part of their 1982 rebuild.

With the new alignments, even freight can easily get from Islington to Coonamia in under three hours.
  allan Chief Commissioner

Re the Mt Gambier trains...

The "Blue Lake Express" was a limited mixed, that ran overnight, while the Day train, in my time, was a Bluebird set. Some Bluebirds were eventually fitted with a "mini-buffet", more like a tiny snack bar.

Chris Banger documented the SAR refreshment services in ARHS Bulletin July, 1996 to October, 1996 (issues #705-708). You can drown in the detail...
  M636C Minister for Railways

It was a pleasant and comfortable train but always seemed painfully slow, perhaps in anticipation of the forthcoming luxury of the Trans ??
The low speed of the route would be why AN realigned ten curves as part of their 1982 rebuild.

With the new alignments, even freight can easily get from Islington to Coonamia in under three hours.
justapassenger

To stray from the topic briefly, I was looking at Google maps photos of Bowmans. It looks as though there were two sharp reverse curves linking the present Balco siding to the main line north of Bowmans. Where was the Bownans passenger station?

Peter
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

To stray from the topic briefly, I was looking at Google maps photos of Bowmans. It looks as though there were two sharp reverse curves linking the present Balco siding to the main line north of Bowmans. Where was the Bownans passenger station?

Peter
M636C
The satellite images show it pretty clearly. The station was adjacent to Balaclava Road. You can see the formations of the lines in all directions, and the wye.
  allan Chief Commissioner

To stray from the topic briefly, I was looking at Google maps photos of Bowmans. It looks as though there were two sharp reverse curves linking the present Balco siding to the main line north of Bowmans. Where was the Bownans passenger station?

Peter
M636C
Found it! On Google Earth. A little to the East of the "town", and parallel to the Balaclava Rd, but West of the water tower. The platform is still there.

Bowmans has a convoluted railway history - the line has been built four times! The first line ran East/West, between Hamley Bridge and Pt Wakefield (hence the alignment of the platform). This line, built as 3'6 was reguaged in the 1920s to 5'3. Then the broad gauge line from Adelaide to Pt Pirie was built, North/South, crossing at Bowmans. After the original line was closed, the new line was realigned and reguaged.

I've just discovered another three-gauge town!
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

The Dining car "Adelaide" was built for the Overland during the Webb era. It was used until the Depression running form Adelaide to Tailem Bend (or Murray Bridge) on the eastern journey being picked up next morning on the western journey. Cost cutting saw its demise during the 1929 depression when pax numbers declined.
It was only used occasionally after that.
There was a fire in the cafeteria car (can't recall the date) and for a while the Adelaide was used on the East West Express while the cafeteria was repaired.

In the steam era the East-West Express was scheduled to Pirie in 3 hours and one trip was done in 154 minutes!
I attended a wedding reception in the Adelaide, c1971, the first such hire, which went out to Long Gulley and return.
  x31 Chief Commissioner

Location: gallifrey
This is an amazing discussion.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
The Dining car "Adelaide" was built for the Overland during the Webb era. It was used until the Depression running form Adelaide to Tailem Bend (or Murray Bridge) on the eastern journey being picked up next morning on the western journey. Cost cutting saw its demise during the 1929 depression when pax numbers declined.
It was only used occasionally after that.
There was a fire in the cafeteria car (can't recall the date) and for a while the Adelaide was used on the East West Express while the cafeteria was repaired.

In the steam era the East-West Express was scheduled to Pirie in 3 hours and one trip was done in 154 minutes!
I attended a wedding reception in the Adelaide, c1971, the first such hire, which went out to Long Gulley and return.
steam4ian
Thanks S4i.

'In the steam era the East-West Express was scheduled to Pirie in 3 hours and one trip was done in 154 minutes!'

I don't doubt it!

Times went backwards to around 3 hours 20 minutes in the 1970s but, as I have said, the East - West was pleasant and comfortable train but always gave me the impression that it was almost deliberately dawdling on the 134 mile trip.

Off thread I know, but if/when did the refreshment stop at Bowmans fit into Adelaide - Pirie services?
  allan Chief Commissioner

Bowmans RRR closed mid-1974. It was always privately operated, and as best I can figure, never offered sit-down meals. I'm guessing, too, that this is where steam locos took water, so that dieselisation of the loco fleet eliminated the opportunity to get to the counter.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Bowmans RRR closed mid-1974. It was always privately operated, and as best I can figure, never offered sit-down meals. I'm guessing, too, that this is where steam locos took water, so that dieselisation of the loco fleet eliminated the opportunity to get to the counter.
allan
Thanks Allan.
More or less fits with my memory from the late 1960s (?) as the train I was on which was hauled by a 520 took water there.
  DJPeters Deputy Commissioner

The Dining car "Adelaide" was built for the Overland during the Webb era. It was used until the Depression running form Adelaide to Tailem Bend (or Murray Bridge) on the eastern journey being picked up next morning on the western journey. Cost cutting saw its demise during the 1929 depression when pax numbers declined.
It was only used occasionally after that.
There was a fire in the cafeteria car (can't recall the date) and for a while the Adelaide was used on the East West Express while the cafeteria was repaired.

In the steam era the East-West Express was scheduled to Pirie in 3 hours and one trip was done in 154 minutes!
I attended a wedding reception in the Adelaide, c1971, the first such hire, which went out to Long Gulley and return.
steam4ian
From memory there have been two fires in the Cafeteria car over the years. Both times though the car got repaired after it. Also when the Cafe Car was out of service for repairs or red carded etc Adelaide was usually used as a replacement but sometimes in later years a spare RBJ car from the Overland was used and DC783 was included as the power car for it. DC783 was a departmental car and was simply used as the power for the RBJ and passengers had to walk through it, the compartments etc all being locked off out of use.
  Gayspie Deputy Commissioner

Location: Adelaide, SA
Why do dining cars catch on fire so easily ?
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Why do dining cars catch on fire so easily ?
Heath Loxton
Ever spent any time in a commercial kitchen Heath?
Add  rocking movement and a stove top and there's your answer
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

The BBC's top journalists did an investigation into this a few years back:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMWBPrFVwLk

Yes, I know the whole thing was carefully scripted. It doesn't make it any less funny!

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