Bwahaha go on team whinge about this

 

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  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: Lurking
VicRoads doesn't have WOLO - so no real effect I guess - except for maybe some tar splatters on cars.
  Dangersdan707 Chief Commissioner

Location: On a Thing with Internet
that has happened around where I live years ago, south of Melbourne. people never seemed to care about It alas MORE THE REASON to travel using Rail
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: Lurking
Oops, they do have WOLO - one lane closed it seems.
  Clyde Goodwin2 Chief Train Controller

Oops, they do have WOLO - one lane closed it seems.
mikesyd
LOL yeah supposedly fixing it overnight i dont like there chances of that.
  allan Chief Commissioner

Perhaps they could use bitumen, instead of tar...
  HardWorkingMan Chief Commissioner

Location: Echuca
it seems that some of the newer roadmaking techniques don't actually work as well as the old.  When they rebuilt the northern highway there was some sort of membrane unrolled between the first and 2nd layers of bitumen.  It hasn't melted but goes glossy (and throws up tar) in the heat while the untouched side roads are fine.

The Hume carries more traffic so will be getting pounded more than the roads up here so will be heated more from the vehicles running over it.

A lot of people don't realize the bitumen is actually designed to wear in much the same way as a rail does.  They are both Infrastructure built to do a job and wear out as a result.  The same thing happens with carpet and other things too.  If they don't wear then they are not being used and a waste of money.
  BrentonGolding Chief Commissioner

Location: Maldon Junction
it seems that some of the newer roadmaking techniques don't actually work as well as the old.  When they rebuilt the northern highway there was some sort of membrane unrolled between the first and 2nd layers of bitumen.  It hasn't melted but goes glossy (and throws up tar) in the heat while the untouched side roads are fine.
HardWorkingMan
Is the membrane for drainage? Looking at recently laid parts of the Calder the top layer seems to be quite porous and only extends to the White line on the LHS of the road. The hard shoulder is one layer lower than the road and seems to be no where near as porous. When it rains you see runoff water on the hard shoulder but the road surface seems quite dry in comparison and doesn't suffer from pooling.

I wonder if the membrane is to aid the runoff.

BG
  theanimal Chief Commissioner

it seems that some of the newer roadmaking techniques don't actually work as well as the old.  When they rebuilt the northern highway there was some sort of membrane unrolled between the first and 2nd layers of bitumen.  It hasn't melted but goes glossy (and throws up tar) in the heat while the untouched side roads are fine.

The Hume carries more traffic so will be getting pounded more than the roads up here so will be heated more from the vehicles running over it.

A lot of people don't realize the bitumen is actually designed to wear in much the same way as a rail does.  They are both Infrastructure built to do a job and wear out as a result.  The same thing happens with carpet and other things too.  If they don't wear then they are not being used and a waste of money.
HardWorkingMan
Not sure it is a recent problem, I remember walking home from school in the early 1960s' and having the tar stick to my shoes.
  allan Chief Commissioner

Not sure it is a recent problem, I remember walking home from school in the early 1960s' and having the tar stick to my shoes.
theanimal
In the 1960s it was more than likely tar, as opposed to bitumen.

http://civilblog.org/2015/07/15/15-differences-between-bitumen-and-tar-used-in-road-construction/
  theanimal Chief Commissioner

Not sure it is a recent problem, I remember walking home from school in the early 1960s' and having the tar stick to my shoes.
In the 1960s it was more than likely tar, as opposed to bitumen.

http://civilblog.org/2015/07/15/15-differences-between-bitumen-and-tar-used-in-road-construction/
allan
Did not realize there was a difference, thanks for that.

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