Questions that you've always been too embarrassed to ask

 
  N463 Locomotive Driver

Ok, has there ever been any tender to tender operation in Australia? If yes, where and when? If no, why not?
Dangersdan707
The Train Hobby N class locomotive profile book has a picture on page 18 of N456 and a R running back to back.

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  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
tender to tender is becoming more common in Victoria (or back-to-back diesels) as turntables have been decommissioned or officially open but not maintained
HardWorkingMan
Ohhh, sorry, i took a look again at the photo after reading this comment.

I take back my original comment, perhaps just the same amount of work.  And logical where a train can run around instead of needing to turn.

Were any engines ever purpose built with this format in mind?  Ie, boiler+Cab, tender, boiler+cab?  Kind of like a Garratt but kind of not....
  Dangersdan707 Deputy Commissioner

Location: On a Thing with Internet
never seen it on Preserved steam before though in Victoria or Aus
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: no longer in Sydney
tender to tender is becoming more common in Victoria (or back-to-back diesels) as turntables have been decommissioned or officially open but not maintained
Ohhh, sorry, i took a look again at the photo after reading this comment.

I take back my original comment, perhaps just the same amount of work.  And logical where a train can run around instead of needing to turn.

Were any engines ever purpose built with this format in mind?  Ie, boiler+Cab, tender, boiler+cab?  Kind of like a Garratt but kind of not....
james.au
Yes, the Double Fairlie. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ffestiniog_DLG_BF.JPG

The NSWGR 60 Class Garratts could run in either direction without restriction I think.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
IF we accept that the position of the driver's seat on the Xtrap suburban trains precludes them running services on some lines, why do we continue to proliferate these trains with the location of the driver's seat unchanged?

Surely we are only looking at a bit of design a few cables and a bit of pipework to make any new trains universally operable?
  michaelgm Assistant Commissioner

Tender to tender, see link below, credit BW.



https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HryxMybIwE0
  Valvegear The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Norda Fittazroy
There is certainly footage in existence of two NSW 32 class locos working tender-to tender on a special tour train, somewhere in the north of NSW if I remember correctly.
"Valvegear"
Well done michaelgm; you found it.
  Ballast_Plough Chief Commissioner

Location: Lilydale, Vic
A lot of workings to Bright had K Class locos working tender to tender. Mainly because they couldn't be turned at one stage so it was easier to run 2 locos with 1 facing each direction.
  Big J Assistant Commissioner

Location: In Paradise
Sorry the answer is probably obvious, but I am not sure of the actual answer.

In the past I have seen speedboards in Queensland that state "SN", instead of a number. In more recent times I cannot recall seeing them on the QR or Aurizon networks, but I do still see them on the cane networks. I am certain I use to see them in Far North Queensland on the Sunshine Route in the 70s and 80s, but with yard rationalisation and change of safe working I think they are no longer there. But as I said I still see them on cane lines. For them usually after sidings.

I think it means speed normal, but I would like to hear from people that actually know.

Appreciate the advice in advance.
  KRviator Moderator

Location: Up the front
Sorry the answer is probably obvious, but I am not sure of the actual answer.

In the past I have seen speedboards in Queensland that state "SN", instead of a number. In more recent times I cannot recall seeing them on the QR or Aurizon networks, but I do still see them on the cane networks. I am certain I use to see them in Far North Queensland on the Sunshine Route in the 70s and 80s, but with yard rationalisation and change of safe working I think they are no longer there. But as I said I still see them on cane lines. For them usually after sidings.

I think it means speed normal, but I would like to hear from people that actually know.

Appreciate the advice in advance.
Big J
SN Speed Boards

Speed Normal Boards are speed boards that place the onus on the Driver of a train to travel at speeds considered safe for that section of track being travelled over. These boards are gradually being phased out in accordance with Queensland Rail’s Civil Standard MD-10-87 - SPEED BOARDS
Queensland Rail Network Access
  Big J Assistant Commissioner

Location: In Paradise
Sorry the answer is probably obvious, but I am not sure of the actual answer.

In the past I have seen speedboards in Queensland that state "SN", instead of a number. In more recent times I cannot recall seeing them on the QR or Aurizon networks, but I do still see them on the cane networks. I am certain I use to see them in Far North Queensland on the Sunshine Route in the 70s and 80s, but with yard rationalisation and change of safe working I think they are no longer there. But as I said I still see them on cane lines. For them usually after sidings.

I think it means speed normal, but I would like to hear from people that actually know.

Appreciate the advice in advance.
SN Speed Boards

Speed Normal Boards are speed boards that place the onus on the Driver of a train to travel at speeds considered safe for that section of track being travelled over. These boards are gradually being phased out in accordance with Queensland Rail’s Civil Standard MD-10-87 - SPEED BOARDS
KRviator
Thankyou KRviator, very much appreciated.
  billybaxter Deputy Commissioner

Location: Bosnia Park, Fairfield
How many platforms did the old Townsville station have? Old timetables also show quite a few closely spaced stops within the urban areas of Townsville and Rockhampton(e.g. Railway Estate, Park Avenue). Did these locations have platforms?
  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
How many platforms did the old Townsville station have? Old timetables also show quite a few closely spaced stops within the urban areas of Townsville and Rockhampton(e.g. Railway Estate, Park Avenue). Did these locations have platforms?
billybaxter
@Sulla might be able to answer this for you.

And this is probably not a silly question for this thread - it could warrant a stand alone thread!
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: WW1 ended with Treaty of Versailles 28 June 1919
Here's a long standing question I've got that I've never thought to ask when I was near someone who would probably know that answer.

From what I've seen a lot of NSW loco's (possibly all? and possibly locos from interstate?) were fitted with a "Drifting" gauge.

In terms of a steam locomotive, what is drifting, what unit is it measured in, how is that gauge expected to behave when the locomotive is functioning normally and what sort of fault could be indicated if the "Drifting" gauge is not reading correctly?

My only experience with drifting is in the Mighty Car Mods Nissan 240SX sense, and I somehow don't think you can powerslide a 38 Class around Maldon Curve.

Thanks in Advance for your help.
steve_w_1990
This is a month old and I have not seen seen an answer for the other person who asked this question. While I can find the reference in a publication and answer it myself by using a book, I was hoping someone with real life footplane knowledge might help. I understand NSW was not the only state with it.

I understand the answer involves admitting steam into the cylinders while the loco is normally not using steam to power, but the train still is running at speed, eg **drifting** down a grade, so the pistons are still moving at high speed. This piston action can cause a vacuum in the cylinders and thus perhaps draw back muck into the cylinders from the smokebox, plus other side effects. Or so I understand, and please feel free to add the right answer (hint hint).
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
One 'cracked' the regulator and wound the valvegear out to full gear when drifting to maintain lubrication and avoid 'short stroke' wear in the valves.
Probably not an answer to the real question but might help a bit.
I don't think that VR locos had drifting gauges but open to correction.
  neillfarmer Train Controller

Yes, preventing ash being drawn into the cylinder is the main reason. Maintaining lubrication is another. Often when the driver opens up after drifting down hill the exhaust will be loud until he quickly winds back the reverser to a position closer to mid-gear.
Neill Farmer
  Dangersdan707 Deputy Commissioner

Location: On a Thing with Internet
Ok here’s one, why isn’t there a BG loop in ararat
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Ok here’s one, why isn’t there a BG loop in ararat
Dangersdan707
No need for one for the traffic intended (railcars only).
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

How many platforms did the old Townsville station have? Old timetables also show quite a few closely spaced stops within the urban areas of Townsville and Rockhampton(e.g. Railway Estate, Park Avenue). Did these locations have platforms?
billybaxter
The old Townsville Station had one through platform and three dock platforms. The station was originally built as a dead end terminus in 1913, the through line wasn't added until 1927. There were several suburban stations on the double track section of the North Coast Line between Townsville and Stuart - including Railway Estate (shelter sheds and platforms), Queens Road (shelter sheds and platforms), Yenoor (shelter sheds and platforms), Quealban (shelter sheds and platforms), Oonoonba (station, platforms, signal cabin), Cluden (shelter sheds and platforms), Wulguru (shelter sheds and platforms), Warkamai (shelter sheds and platforms) and an island junction platform at Stuart (station plus signal cabin). South of Stuart on the double track was the railmotor stop at Birigaba, the station at Julago and the station at Nome (later moved to Garbutt), junction for the meatworks branch to Oolbun at the mouth of Alligator Creek (the destination of several daily suburban passenger trains).

Not too sure about Rockhampton - the suburban trains mostly ran down the Yeppoon and Emu Bay branches. Major mainline stations on the way were Rockhampton (five platforms), Archer Park and Glenmore Junction.
  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
Not that im embarrassed to ask this, but why are a string of carriages/wagons called a rake?  

Google isnt giving me much of a clue...  It seems like its been used for quite some time.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Not that im embarrassed to ask this, but why are a string of carriages/wagons called a rake?  

Google isnt giving me much of a clue...  It seems like its been used for quite some time.
james.au
Don't know.

It has been a rake for more than 50 years to my knowledge and I suspect a lot longer than that but for wagons only.

The term 'rake' has never applied to passenger carriages in the normal course although the term may apply, perhaps, to a group of out of service passenger cars attached to a goods train I suppose.

A group of in service passenger cars is a 'consist' especially if it is a group that normally stays together or forms a regular makeup.

In this day and age of amateurs (and idiots) anything can be called anything eg:

Wagons = carriages
Carriages = wagons
Locomotives = trains
Passengers = guests and customers
Empty cars/carriages = depassengerised
Uncouple = decouple

We are in the hands of Philistines so far as rail terminology is concerned. It is no wonder that there is confusion in so many areas.Crying or Very sad
  michaelgm Assistant Commissioner

This is above rail question.Laughing

Quick background. Had an old mate who's old man had homing pigeons. Old mate and I have drifted apart, and the old man is now deceased.
Well the old man moved house, and presumably took his birds. Anyone know, Is it possible to relocate homing pigeons?
  allan Chief Commissioner

It has been a rake for more than 50 years to my knowledge and I suspect a lot longer than that but for wagons only.

The term 'rake' has never applied to passenger carriages in the normal course although the term may apply, perhaps, to a group of out of service passenger cars attached to a goods train I suppose.

A group of in service passenger cars is a 'consist' especially if it is a group that normally stays together or forms a regular makeup.

In this day and age of amateurs (and idiots) anything can be called anything eg:

Wagons = carriages
Carriages = wagons
Locomotives = trains
Passengers = guests and customers
Empty cars/carriages = depassengerised
Uncouple = decouple

We are in the hands of Philistines so far as rail terminology is concerned. It is no wonder that there is confusion in so many areas.Crying or Very sad
YM-Mundrabilla
English is a live, dynamic and evolving language spoken over much of the world. It's hardly surprising that words fall in and out of favour or get new meanings. Look what happened to "gay"!

As for the multiple meanings and mulltiple origins of "rake" go to https://www.google.com.au/search?q=rake+meaning&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b&gfe_rd=cr&dcr=0&ei=chGJWqasBsjr8AeB5o3IDQ
  tazzer96 Deputy Commissioner

Why were the railways in Victoria originally built to such a high standards (in general) compared to the other states, in particular NSW and Qld.  
The Bendigo, Ballarat, Geelong lines in particular were all built to high speed standards yet in NSW and qld they weren't.  Despite in many places have easier topography.
  allan Chief Commissioner

Why were the railways in Victoria originally built to such a high standards (in general) compared to the other states, in particular NSW and Qld.  
The Bendigo, Ballarat, Geelong lines in particular were all built to high speed standards yet in NSW and qld they weren't.  Despite in many places have easier topography.
tazzer96
I'll guess that that's where the money was...

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