Domabarton triangle

 
  Junction box Chief Commissioner

Location: newy
Does anyone know anything about the turning triangle or sidings at Dombarton?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pskTsLBmvco

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  G Train Locomotive Driver

I don't think there was ever a triangle at Dombarton. There were refuge sidings however cut back into the hill on a rising grade. My understanding is that this was to allow refuged trains to gain momentum when they continued the climb. These passed under the main line. I believe the bridge was removed in the late 80's or early 90's after the signal box & refuge sidings were closed and reused on the Lavender Bay branch to the old Milsons Point Station. Others may be able to confirm this, unless I have my recycled bridges mixed up.
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: Lurking
Old thread here (most photo links are dead) includes a diagram.

https://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11308186.htm
  62440 Chief Commissioner

We went through the loop on a special post-conference tour in 1983, including through the underpass bridge. We also looked at the site of the tunnel which then was well underway. There were diagrams in the 1983 PWI book but I can't track down a copy. Yes, definitely not a triangle. Coming up the hill to a cross, you would turn left to a level siding, then reverse under the line to the hill face with a siding long enough so you ween't starting on the grade, Similarly standing aside on the downhill, turn left, back under the main and stand level before heading down the hill.
  Junction box Chief Commissioner

Location: newy
Thanks for the replies, anything remain from the old layout?
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
Does anyone know anything about the turning triangle or sidings at Dombarton?
Junction box

Dombarton never had engine turning facilities; bank engines kept banking to the end of the 1 in 30 grade at Summit Tank, where there was a Water Tank (funny that) and a turntable to turn bank engines for the return trip to Unanderra or whereever.

Dombarton is on that 1 in 30 grade which is unsuitable for normal designs of crossing loops. Dombarton was built in IIFC 1940s, and learned from the fiasco of the (1920?) Boronia Refuge Loops half way up Hawkesbury-Cowan bank. The problem was that heavy trains could not restart on the 1 in 40. At Dombarton, trains restarted on (almost) level track.

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