Train driver applies emergency brakes after track mishap near Glenrowan

 

News article: Train driver applies emergency brakes after track mishap near Glenrowan

Services on the troubled North East rail line have been experiencing delays following an incident near Glenrowan.

  x31 Chief Commissioner

Location: gallifrey
A steel train dropped the coil in the tracks.  Could have been from an WM2 service?

Train driver applies emergency brakes after track mishap near Glenrowan

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  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
A coil was bumped off the train.
  Jack Le Lievre Chief Train Controller

Location: Moolap Station, Vic
A steel train dropped the coil in the tracks.  Could have been from an WM2 service?

Train driver applies emergency brakes after track mishap near Glenrowan
x31
It was 6WM2 on Good Friday.

http://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/investigation_reports/2018/rair/ro-2018-008/

Jack
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat RFR Line
A coil was bumped off the train.
freightgate

'Bumped'...being the operative word in view of the condition of the track...Yet ARTC still says the track is 'fit for purpose', as their standards are significantly lower than V/Line's track standard.

Mike.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia

'Bumped'...being the operative word in view of the condition of the track...Yet ARTC still says the track is 'fit for purpose', as their standards are significantly lower than V/Line's track standard.

Mike.
The Vinelander

Are those coils secured at all or do they sit in the harness and rely on their weight for stability?
  Jack Le Lievre Chief Train Controller

Location: Moolap Station, Vic

'Bumped'...being the operative word in view of the condition of the track...Yet ARTC still says the track is 'fit for purpose', as their standards are significantly lower than V/Line's track standard.

Mike.
Are those coils secured at all or do they sit in the harness and rely on their weight for stability?
bevans
Depends on who you ask, some of the guys in Melbourne think Zero, some think One and others say Two. Apparently, there are meant to be Two, but I have rarely seen more than One if any.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
The coils were not secured in the cradles prior to at least 2000. I don't know if the position has changed since then.

The coils are/were held wound/coiled with steel strapping. It is not unknown for the straps to break and the coil to at least partially unwind.

Have train speeds increased since around 2000 given the use of higher speed (Y?) container flats in lieu of the former X type flat flats?

If coil trains now run at greater than 80 km/h I wonder what consideration was given to the 'relatively insecure' loading of unrestrained coils at any increased speed.

The centre of gravity (CoG) and transverse positioning of the jumbo coils in cradles on container flats has always been of interest to me but as a non-engineer I can only assume that the current arrangements were assessed and approved by people competent to do so.

One of my suggestions years ago was that on the SG at any rate the jumbo coil cradles should be placed in well wagons to both lower the CoG and also provide some barrier to lateral movement. The height of the cradles in the well wagons was to be at a minimal height sufficient only to allow C-hook or fork prong access above the gunwale for loading/transfer/unloading.

It will be interesting to see what the ATSB comes up with (in about 2057).
  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
2nd thread started in the Victorian forums, now locked in favor of this thread.

Have a look at it then come back here to comment....


https://www.railpage.com.au/f-p2099434.htm#2099434
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
These coils can weigh up to and over 5 tonnes depending on size, width and thickness on the steel.

I've seen some truckers use between 2 and 4 heavy chains threaded through the centre to tie them down on their trucks.

At work we place an adjustable strap around the coil when cutting the steel restraining bands.
There is an awful lot of restrained energy in the coils, you don't wannabe anywhere near them if the restraining bands break/snap

EDIT:- Because of sharp edges of the steel coil the use of fabric straps is a total no-no as gentle movement in transport will cut through the webbing so easily, so chains must always be used.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
These coils can weigh up to and over 5 tonnes depending on size, width and thickness on the steel.

I've seen some truckers use between 2 and 4 heavy chains threaded through the centre to tie them down on their trucks.

At work we place an adjustable strap around the coil when cutting the steel restraining bands.
There is an awful lot of restrained energy in the coils, you don't wannabe anywhere near them if the restraining bands break/snap

EDIT:- Because of sharp edges of the steel coil the use of fabric straps is a total no-no as gentle movement in transport will cut through the webbing so easily, so chains must always be used.
Pressman
Thanks Pressman.

Pretty diabolical things (especially the jumbo coils) to handle and transport.

A lot of the feedstock for Long Island was in the form of slab back in the days. Most was ex Port Kembla by sea on BHP's Iron Monarch with overflow by rail but some by rail from Whyalla too.

Easier to transport slab which, despite the Iron Monarch, was still a substantial traffic on rail years ago it was still transferred at Albury SG to BG for many years after the SG reached Melbourne.

Be interesting to see what the ATSB and the nanny state comes up with in 10 years or so - probably import the coil from China! Sad

At the very least this stuff should be carried on properly designed and purpose built rolling stock but, here again, the bloody BG doubles the cost and difficulty although this could be mitigated by the use of 'rubbish' rolling stock ex the SG due to the short distance and low speed involved.
  Fatty Assistant Commissioner

Location: Melbourne
The coils on WM services weigh 25 to 35 tonnes. They are held in the cradles by their weight. Maximum speed for steel services is 80 km/h. Rumour is the strapping on the coil failed and it partially unwound and was then dragged off.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
The coils on WM services weigh 25 to 35 tonnes. They are held in the cradles by their weight. Maximum speed for steel services is 80 km/h. Apparently the strapping on the coil failed and it partially unwound and was then dragged off.
Fatty
Thanks Fatty.
Confirms what I thought (but wasn't game to say) about the lack of securing.
If the coil came unwound it would not be the first time but an easier solution than saying 'hit a hole in the road and it bounced off the wagon'.
(Apart from anything else unwinding coils tend to play havoc with the overhead. !!!!!  Rolling Eyes  )
  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland
What's so hard about chaining the coils down to their cradles ?
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
What's so hard about chaining the coils down to their cradles ?
Nightfire
Not quite so simple.

Time, money, equipment, labour for a start. The almighty dollar $$$$.

Perhaps improve the strapping as an interim move?

Not much point in attaching the coil to the cradle, on some wagons at least, as both may go walkabout together in certain circumstances. One is then faced with finding/building suitable anchor points on the wagons.

Coiled steel is very susceptible to edge damage (bit like newsprint) and the current cradle arrangements work well in that regard. By their very nature coils lend themselves to 'wedge' type cradles provided they are restrained (as distinct from secured) laterally. Whilst loaded on the centreline of the wagon some have been known to shift laterally. This is where the track, especially, and wagon ride come into it.

We need to remember that thousands upon thousands of these coils of various sizes have been successfully carried by rail over many many years and we must not overreact to an individual incident. We must restrain the nanny state from going overboard with a suicidal solution to a problem which experience says barely exists.

Long term my solution would be to acquire a purpose designed and built fleet of dedicated 'well' coil wagons but I, of course, do not know how long the current traffic is expected to last given the demise of just about everything in Australia at the moment.

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