Nepean-warragamba aerial ropeway

 
  markmeow Locomotive Driver

Hello,

Does anyone know where I can find the remains of the nepean-warragamba aerial ropeway?

Sponsored advertisement

  johnboy Chief Commissioner

Location: Up the road from Gulgong
I remember in the early 1970s most of it was removed. It went through the Emu Plains Gaol and onward...

A quick search on google earth shows nothing anymore.
  ozibob Assistant Commissioner

Location: Parkes Australia
Can't help you about finding stuff, but this forum thread might help a little.http://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11305952.htm
  fernhill Chief Train Controller

Are you talking about the one used to construct the dam wall?
If so most was lost in the big bush fire out there - forget what year but at least 7 years ago.
There are sections of the landing on the western side remaining
Burrinjuck Dam still has its ropeway still working
  borosa Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
Are there any photos of the ropeway or the supporting towers anywhere??
  theanimal Chief Commissioner

several year ago i bought a book written and published by a chap who worked on the building of the dam, the book had photos of the ropeway and included how the workers would come into penrith and go home to warragamba in the buckets. (drunk i imagine)

The author was Red Morgan and he had a stall at the Windsor markets on a sunday, interestingly i was there this week and he has written another book on his time in the merchant marine during WW2 so i bought it.

Can only applaud someone with the guts to write a book and fund its publication himself.

His contact details are
2600 Silverdale Road
WARRAGAMBA 2752
0247738838

so if anyone wanted a book on the construction of this dam give him a ring.
  tranx Assistant Commissioner

Location: Somewhere in Southwest Sydney
On a side topic, my stepmother's family grew up in the Burragorang Valley before it was flooded by Sydney Water for the construction of Warragamba Dam in the 1950's.

I have seen black & white photos of the valley and it was so beautiful with a trickling brook. The valley had its own town, post office, dairy, church, school. It was a lovely place. Crossing the Nepean River was a wooden trestle bridge which the foundations can still be seen when the dam levels are at its lowest.

The families that lived in the valley didnt even receive any compensation back then from Sydney Water.

All of it was flooded for the sake of Sydney.
  Warks Minister for Railways

Location: Near H30+059
On a side topic, my stepmother's family grew up in the Burragorang Valley before it was flooded by Sydney Water for the construction of Warragamba Dam in the 1950's.

I have seen black & white photos of the valley and it was so beautiful with a trickling brook. The valley had its own town, post office, dairy, church, school. It was a lovely place. Crossing the Nepean River was a wooden trestle bridge which the foundations can still be seen when the dam levels are at its lowest.

The families that lived in the valley didnt even receive any compensation back then from Sydney Water.

All of it was flooded for the sake of Sydney.
"tranx"


They don't tend to build dams in ugly valleys for some reason - I've seen photos of the Blowering Valley before Blowering and Talbingo dams were built - beautiful spots.  I don't know if there was any compensation given to farms and houses lost in the Snowy scheme.  I do know that people who lost their houses for the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and approaches were not compensated - imagine that!

There's certainly some interesting history in this state.
  michinyon Chief Commissioner

I do know that people who lost their houses for the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and approaches were not compensated - imagine that!


The owners of the houses were compensated in the normal way.   The tenants of the houses got no compensation for the inconvenience of moving.  Same as any tenant today whose lease expires or whose landlord wants to sell the house.
  GrahamH Chief Commissioner

Location: At a terminal on the www.
https://www.facebook.com/100022988591536/videos/198307294278889/
marhleet
Astounding, THANKYOU! for adding this to the thread.
  allan Chief Commissioner
  Xavier Station Master

Location: Newcastle, AU
Thanks for sharing. It's pretty interesting that something like this was built and even more interesting that people were actually allowed to ride them lol

These days they would just clog up the roads with trucks rather than spend the time and money to come up with something like this when building another dam.
  gordon_s1942 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Tablelands of NSW
The old Scenic Railway at Katoomba started life hauling Coal from the Mines in the valley below and it then ran the coal on a 'Ropeway' to what is today called Shell Corner and railed away.
This second ropeway doesnt seem to have lasted very long but the Scenic Railway has.
My Mother told me that in the 1930's, arrangements were made for passengers to travel on the Scenic Railway when they we'nt hauling Coal but Coal came first.
I dont know if passengers rode in the same wagon used to carry the Coal or not but nothing would surprise me in its beginnings there was no passenger car unless one was made to convey the Miners and that was used.

The ride today is still a major thrill and attraction and riding in a Coal wagon would have been a highlight of your holidays in the Mountains.
  exarmidale Train Controller

I think you will find that under the Old NSW Public Works Act there was no compensation for land acquisition. Today it is now considered Fair and Reasonable to compensate for land acquisitions by the NSW Government.
  M636C Minister for Railways

There was a similar ropeway for aggregate and sand from Yarramundi (it crossed the Hawkesbury around the location of Springwood Rd) to a loadout on the eastern side of the river. From the loadout there was a standard gauge railway that connected to the Kurrajong line. This used basic unbraked wooden open wagons. I think they had a couple of 25 class locomotives, and of course, 1625. I remember having a picnic in the yard after the operation had shut down. I think we climbed into the cab of 1625.

My father also took me to the construction site of the Warragamba Dam and I noticed the similarity of the ropeway to that at Yarramundi.

Peter
  cityrail-rulez Train Controller

Burrinjuck Dam still has its ropeway still working
fernhill
What Ropeway at Burrinjuck Dam? I have never seen it, I know that the Burrinjuck Dam had a 610mm guage railway line from Goondah, but I have never seen any photos relating to a ropeway at Burrinjuck Dam?

If you can prove otherwise, I won't say anything more about it! But I am sure that Burrinjuck Dam has never had a ropeway it has only ever had a railway line and there is little or no traces along it's railway corridore formation
  gordon_s1942 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Tablelands of NSW
I tried to post a link to a site run by Sydney Water about Burrinjuck Dam but it wont work so I suggest you both Google it and read the section regarding its construction.
A 'Ropeway' was used during its construction along with a 'wood fired' steam locomotive.


However I was unable to see if any part or portion of the 'Ropeway' still exists today.
  cityrail-rulez Train Controller

I tried to post a link to a site run by Sydney Water about Burrinjuck Dam but it wont work so I suggest you both Google it and read the section regarding its construction.
A 'Ropeway' was used during its construction along with a 'wood fired' steam locomotive.


However I was unable to see if any part or portion of the 'Ropeway' still exists today.
gordon_s1942
Thanks for that information, Gordon
Cheers Smile
  historian Assistant Commissioner

I think you will find that under the Old NSW Public Works Act there was no compensation for land acquisition. Today it is now considered Fair and Reasonable to compensate for land acquisitions by the NSW Government.
exarmidale

The (original version of the) NSW Public Works Act 1912 can be found here:

http://www.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/viewdb//au/legis/nsw/num_act/pwa1912n45186/

The major focus of the Act was how property acquisition was handled, and the issue of compensation to land owners was a key aspect covered. As you would expect, the State *was* required to compensate land owners.

What is clear, however, was that process could be extremely brutal. The Governor could simply declare the land to be resumed (via publication in the Government Gazette). It was then considered to have been sold. Compensation had to be paid within a month of the agreement as to the amount. But if you disagreed with the amount offered, and invoked the dispute process, it might take a very long time before you got that compensation.

Tenants, also, could claim compensation, but only if they had a long term lease.

Sponsored advertisement

Subscribers: marhleet, wurx

Display from: