Locals want decision on fate of North East Rail Trail

 
Topic moved from News by bevans on 22 Feb 2018 09:08
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Reading the news item I can see how an excursion train from Devonport to the area return would bring a lot of benefit and unlike a rail trail everyone can take the train.  The train would have potential to being in a lot of tourists and day trippers but also provide people at intermediate stops with access to the train in either direction.

Locals want decision on fate of North East Rail Trail

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  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
From Devonport? This would be an all day trip in Tasmania, each way and only the diehards would do it and if they could afford it as long ones.gr of $200 to 300.

The numbers who would use the lucky to be fortnightly train would be a fraction of the rail trail option.

My heart would love to see a viable pax train running weekly at least. My head says look around, it will not be viable just like most of the country unfortunately.
  12CSVT Chief Commissioner

Location: Drowning in accreditation red tape!
First up, any proposition of a commercial passenger transport rail service in Tasmania on the rail network as it currently stands, is pure fantasy and any serious suggestion of such, diminishes the credibility of the restitution of any form of rail passenger service in the state, and damages the credibility of realistic rail passenger advocates.

Two major things need to happen before any commercial rail passenger transport service would ever be feasible. 1] The main south line would have to be TOTALLY re-routed between Brighton and Antill Ponds (via the Jordan River Valley) and the existing line via Campania, Colebrook, Rhyndaston and Parattah totally abandoned. Simple deviations on the existing line would never be sufficient;  2] The rest of the MSL and Western Line seriously upgraded to high-speed capability, with multiple deviations, curve straightening and super-elevation. Anything less than a 160kph maximum (for passengers) or 110kph average, would be insufficient. Obviously that would cost a fortune - however, the benefits for freight (140kph max) would also be substantial. The prospect of there ever being the money available to fund that is very doubtful (as worthwhile as it would be).

The only realistic prospect at present for passenger services in Tas are those that are currently proposed, i.e. Hobart commuter rail; DVR on the Derwent Valley Line and TTMS on the Hobart Line (which may merge to capture the cruise ship market), LNER on the North-East Line and DRR on the Western Line. Destination & experienced based tourist services in specific limited areas are viable. Expanding those services state-wide is not realistic at present but with a change of management at Tasrail (and State Govt) or a dynamic main-land based entreprenurial player entering the scene, state-wide T&HR services could potentially return.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
First up, any proposition of a commercial passenger transport rail service in Tasmania on the rail network as it currently stands, is pure fantasy and any serious suggestion of such, diminishes the credibility of the restitution of any form of rail passenger service in the state, and damages the credibility of realistic rail passenger advocates.

Two major things need to happen before any commercial rail passenger transport service would ever be feasible. 1] The main south line would have to be TOTALLY re-routed between Brighton and Antill Ponds (via the Jordan River Valley) and the existing line via Campania, Colebrook, Rhyndaston and Parattah totally abandoned. Simple deviations on the existing line would never be sufficient;  2] The rest of the MSL and Western Line seriously upgraded to high-speed capability, with multiple deviations, curve straightening and super-elevation. Anything less than a 160kph maximum (for passengers) or 110kph average, would be insufficient. Obviously that would cost a fortune - however, the benefits for freight (140kph max) would also be substantial. The prospect of there ever being the money available to fund that is very doubtful (as worthwhile as it would be).

The only realistic prospect at present for passenger services in Tas are those that are currently proposed, i.e. Hobart commuter rail; DVR on the Derwent Valley Line and TTMS on the Hobart Line (which may merge to capture the cruise ship market), LNER on the North-East Line and DRR on the Western Line. Destination & experienced based tourist services in specific limited areas are viable. Expanding those services state-wide is not realistic at present but with a change of management at Tasrail (and State Govt) or a dynamic main-land based entreprenurial player entering the scene, state-wide T&HR services could potentially return.
12CSVT
In Rail wish list land
160km/h is max realistic top end speed for NG, but 140km/h would also be reasonable top end speed and the time difference over such short distances is minimal for engineering required. Freight again top end of 100km/h would be more than reasonable for the distances and considering pax is averaging +100km/h station to station more time would be taken to load/unload the train than operate the train.

The by-passed Campania - Parattah abandoned section would make a popular rail trail.

Back to Hobart

I wonder if the Hobart LR/HR pax project will sit in the doldrums as long as the Cruise Ship proposals?

End of the day, Tassie's tourism market is very Nice and limited in size and for the long winter, mostly very small. Makes it hard to justify large scale investment unless you have a high degree of confidence.
  lkernan Deputy Commissioner

Location: Melbourne
The government seems to be set on a compromise proposal where rail runs between Turners Marsh and Lilydale and the bike track from Lilydale to Scottsdale.