'Quiet' or Localised Bells

 
  wilbur16 Beginner

Hey all.
Hope someone can help me out with a bit of a niche question.

I live near a level crossing that has some fairly loud bells. From looking around this site I reckon they are Safetran Type 3's. Now train noise I can deal with, but I'm not particularly close and the those bells are pretty harsh and go often and at all hours.

Anyway, I remember a little while back looking into whether quieter bells are possible. I could be remembering it wrong, but think I found something about electronic bells that localise the sound better for any pedestrians nearby, but for the life of me can't find anything similar googling it now.

From memory, I even found a news article about how some businesses in Adelaide had their bells replaced with the better localised ones a few years ago - again, google is not my friend on this now.


So, can any of you gurus point me in the right direction? Or even any related info would be good.

Cheers!

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  historian Assistant Commissioner

Something like this?

http://download.siemens.com.au/index.php?action=filemanager&doc_form_name=download&folder_id=5709&doc_id=16973

using the 'soft' option.

A second typical solution is to switch off one of the 'bells' late at night. (Typically two are provided, one on each side of the crossing).
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
At the ever increasing number of crossings with automatic pedestrian gates are bells even necessary at all?
What purpose do they serve in these circumstances?
  wilbur16 Beginner

Hmm maybe similar to that one, but I reckon this other one was regular volume immediately surrounding it, quieter to the sides.
Think signs projected downwards rather than 360.

Thanks for the reply though, do you know if that one can switch between loud and soft automatically? Or more of a set and leave type of thing.
  historian Assistant Commissioner

Hmm maybe similar to that one, but I reckon this other one was regular volume immediately surrounding it, quieter to the sides.
Think signs projected downwards rather than 360.

Thanks for the reply though, do you know if that one can switch between loud and soft automatically? Or more of a set and leave type of thing.
wilbur16

Can be switched on demand; usually time based (quieter at night when ambient noise is lower and people are trying to sleep)
  historian Assistant Commissioner

At the ever increasing number of crossings with automatic pedestrian gates are bells even necessary at all?
What purpose do they serve in these circumstances?
YM-Mundrabilla

A bell allows a visually impaired person to quickly notice that a train is coming - as opposed to a gate which the person has to encounter and work out that it is closed.

It would be particularly useful where the person is actually crossing the railway when the train strikes in. I would imagine that unexpectedly encountering a closed gate from the track side would be a disconcerting (and probably disorientating) experience.

(Thinking about it, the bell is a useful second mode even for those that are not visually impaired. The sound is arresting and the sudden start of the bells signals very clearly that a train is approaching. Not everyone will notice the flashing lights - if they are actually on the crossing and the lights are not in their field of view, for example.)
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
The bells are essential unless we want a rash of deaths and/or injuries to doodle-heads who wander around with their noses in their mobiles. They're dumb, so the nanny state has to protect them from themselves.
  7334 Chief Commissioner

Location: In the workshop wondering why I started 7334 in the first place
The bells are essential unless we want a rash of deaths and/or injuries to doodle-heads who wander around with their noses in their mobiles. They're dumb, so the nanny state has to protect them from themselves.
Valvegear
I agree with the first fourteen words, not so much the rest although the "doodle-heads who wander around with their noses in their mobiles" oblivious to their surroundings  are a danger to themselves and everyone else where ever they are and being anywhere near a railway is only coincidental.

There are a couple of level crossings I am aware of near Harden where there are no bells or boom gates, only lights, a fact which I discovered to my surprise.  I am making an assumption that these are private level crossings and each appears to provide access only to a single adjacent home.  Thus the public would generally have no reason to be using the crossings and the people living in the homes would presumably be well aware that there is only a visual indication that a train is approaching.  They are a special case.  I think there may have been a sign at the one of them which I was near indicating the lack of a bell warning but if there was I did not see it.

I discovered the situation one day when I was parked next to the public road across the tracks from the home using the crossing bells (as I thought) to give me a warning of approaching trains.  I was sitting in the car when I heard an approaching train and looked across at the crossing to see the lights flashing.

The point here is that I was expecting an audible warning as that is the usual case and it did not come.  Had I been standing at the approach to the level crossing then I would probably have been aware of the lights but only if I happened to look at them.  Presumably if I were someone about to cross the tracks I would be more attuned to the situation and be checking the lights, or would I?  But if I was expecting a sound then maybe not?  

I realise that these crossings are a special case and not mainstream but the point is that if people are conditioned to expect an audible warning and it does not come it increases the risk.
  M636C Minister for Railways

There is a level crossing on the Moss Vale - Unanderra line over Suttor Road in Moss Vale in an area of housing.

This has an electronic siren noise which while obvious at the crossing itself is much less disturbing than conventional bells. there are lights and boom gates, but no pedestrian gates, if i recall correctly.

I think these siren type alarms are used elsewhere in NSW also.

Peter
  catchpoint Assistant Commissioner

Location: At the end of a loop
There is a level crossing on the Moss Vale - Unanderra line over Suttor Road in Moss Vale in an area of housing.

This has an electronic siren noise which while obvious at the crossing itself is much less disturbing than conventional bells. there are lights and boom gates, but no pedestrian gates, if i recall correctly.

I think these siren type alarms are used elsewhere in NSW also.

Peter
M636C

Gated pedestrian crossings in the Blue Mtns use lights and mechanised gates with a similar electronic siren, that sounds for a time prior to the gates closing, once closed the siren ends, but the lights remain illuminated.

There are emergency breakout gates (via pushbutton) each side if you manage to not complete your crossing over the corridor by the time the gates close.

Regards,

Catchpoint

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