Sleep apnea

 
  kowboyk1 Beginner

hi all,
I have a cat 1 medical tomorrow and over a year ago I was diagnosed with mild sleep apnea which I manage with a CPAP machine. Can anyone tell me if having sleep apnea mean I’ll fail the cat 1 ?
Cheers

Sponsored advertisement

  KRviator Moderator

Location: Up the front
hi all,
I have a cat 1 medical tomorrow and over a year ago I was diagnosed with mild sleep apnea which I manage with a CPAP machine. Can anyone tell me if having sleep apnea mean I’ll fail the cat 1 ?
Cheers
kowboyk1
No, you won't fail the Cat 1. A bunch of Driver's get diagnosed with it every year. Don't bullshyte about it, and make it clear that it is being successfully managed with the machine.

From the official NTC Cat 1 assessment (Page 120 and on is where you want to see):

Safety Critical Workers who are diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and require treatment should have annual review by a sleep specialist to ensure that adequate treatment is maintained.

Advice to workers
All workers suspected of having, or found to have, sleep apnoea or other sleep disorders should be advised about potential impact on Safety Critical Work and strategies for maintaining fitness for duty. General advice should include:
• minimising unnecessary activity at times when normally asleep
• allowing adequate time for sleep
• avoiding working after having missed a large portion of their normal sleep
• avoiding alcohol and sedative medications
• resting if sleepy.

Safety Critical Workers are responsible for:
• notifying management if they are sleepy so safety critical duties may be avoided
• complying with treatment, including management of lifestyle factors
• maintaining their treatment device
• attending review appointments
• honestly reporting their condition to their treating physician and the Authorised Health Professional.

Category 1 and Category 2 Safety Critical Workers
A person is not Fit for Duty Unconditional:
• if the person has established sleep apnoea syndrome (see Section 18.6.2); or
• if the person has severe sleep apnoea on a diagnostic sleep study with or without self-reported excessive daytime sleepiness.

Fit for Duty Subject to Review may be determined, subject to annual review, taking into account the nature of the work and information provided by a specialist* in sleep disorders as to whether the following criteria are met:
• the person is compliant with treatment; and
• the response to treatment is satisfactory.

*The Chief Medical Officer of a rail organisation may determine that review by the worker’s treating general practitioner is sufficient if there is an established pattern of compliance and good response to treatment. The initial granting of Fit for Duty Subject to Review must be based on information provided by a specialist.
  kowboyk1 Beginner

Thankyou so much for the information KRviator. I should mention that I’m not already employed, this is my initial medical to become employed for light rail operations.
Given that I’m seeking employment with this condition, would it be a reason that an employer would reject my application. (I’m in the too hard basket).

From how I understand it, the medical agency where I undergo the procedure don’t pass on exactly what condition I have, just that I am “fit for duty subject to review”. But sounds like it might take a bit of time to reach that point.

I know that the company wants to advise successful candidates by December 7 to start 4 weeks later so it might all be too much trouble for them to take me ...
  KRviator Moderator

Location: Up the front
Thankyou so much for the information KRviator. I should mention that I’m not already employed, this is my initial medical to become employed for light rail operations.
Given that I’m seeking employment with this condition, would it be a reason that an employer would reject my application. (I’m in the too hard basket).

From how I understand it, the medical agency where I undergo the procedure don’t pass on exactly what condition I have, just that I am “fit for duty subject to review”. But sounds like it might take a bit of time to reach that point.

I know that the company wants to advise successful candidates by December 7 to start 4 weeks later so it might all be too much trouble for them to take me ...
kowboyk1
I had an issue recently where I had to undergo an out-of-schedule medical review, and the quack may ask your permission to discuss your condition with the employer.

If you don't feel comfortable with that - I didn't - they will only issue one of three outcomes. "Fit for duty - unconditional", "Fit for duty -subject to review", or "Unfit for duty". In your case, it'd likely be "Fit for duty - subject to review", which is all you'd need for the employer to hire you. They might contact you directly to discuss what that review might entail down the track, but if you're doing medicals, you'd really have to fail the medical to not be employed at this point.
  kowboyk1 Beginner

Thankyou so much for the information KRviator. I should mention that I’m not already employed, this is my initial medical to become employed for light rail operations.
Given that I’m seeking employment with this condition, would it be a reason that an employer would reject my application. (I’m in the too hard basket).

From how I understand it, the medical agency where I undergo the procedure don’t pass on exactly what condition I have, just that I am “fit for duty subject to review”. But sounds like it might take a bit of time to reach that point.

I know that the company wants to advise successful candidates by December 7 to start 4 weeks later so it might all be too much trouble for them to take me ...
I had an issue recently where I had to undergo an out-of-schedule medical review, and the quack may ask your permission to discuss your condition with the employer.

If you don't feel comfortable with that - I didn't - they will only issue one of three outcomes. "Fit for duty - unconditional", "Fit for duty -subject to review", or "Unfit for duty". In your case, it'd likely be "Fit for duty - subject to review", which is all you'd need for the employer to hire you. They might contact you directly to discuss what that review might entail down the track, but if you're doing medicals, you'd really have to fail the medical to not be employed at this point.
KRviator


oh wow.... thanks so much for that.  You've really put my mind at ease.  I was thinking it was all over for me.  I was feeling so good making it this far then spun out of control thinking i was doomed hahaha.  But now I'll just lay it all on the line and hopefully that'll be all good to progress.  
Thank you so much for your help.  I really do appreciate it Smile
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Good luck Kowboyk1.
  kowboyk1 Beginner

Good luck Kowboyk1.
YM-Mundrabilla
Cheers, thanks for the well wishes...  ive got everything crossed lol
  kowboyk1 Beginner

Ahhhh.. so I failed the colour blind test.
The doc said I’m unfit for duty and required to do a Railcorp led lantern test ????
  seb2351 Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
Ahhhh.. so I failed the colour blind test.
The doc said I’m unfit for duty and required to do a Railcorp led lantern test ????
kowboyk1
This is not necessarily a bad thing just yet. I worked with a trainee driver who had colour blindness, and as I found out there are different types.
His was he couldn't see blue and yellow properly.

He was required to do the lantern test, wear these glasses to help correct the issue and is now happily driving trains.

He did tell me but if its red/green blindness then the glasses don't work.

All the best with it
  kowboyk1 Beginner

Thanks seb2351...
I had the lantern test and sadly failed that one too. The HR lady said not to give up hope just yet, but I can’t imagine any way I can do the job without passing the medical. I’m disappointed with the situation and with my eyesight deficiency but I know I can’t do anything to improve my colour blindness. I can’t study, I can’t try harder, it’s just how it is and I have to accept it. Thanks everyone for your well wishes
  KRviator Moderator

Location: Up the front
Thanks seb2351...
I had the lantern test and sadly failed that one too. The HR lady said not to give up hope just yet, but I can’t imagine any way I can do the job without passing the medical. I’m disappointed with the situation and with my eyesight deficiency but I know I can’t do anything to improve my colour blindness. I can’t study, I can’t try harder, it’s just how it is and I have to accept it. Thanks everyone for your well wishes
kowboyk1
I don't want to get your hopes up, as they may see you as in the too-bard basket, but the below is a quote from the Cat1 guidelines, if you can explain it to the HR staff, they may be able to confirm it with Operations? If you have a driver's licence (which I'm guessing you do as pretty much every job needs it), you could argue you can already interpret traffic lights, and in turn, use the actual position of the illuminated lamp, rather than the colour, to determine the aspect, as described in the NTC guidelines?

Tram drivers usually have to use traffic lights similarly to vehicle drivers. Traffic lights have positional cues and hence redundancy of information, so colour vision is not required to be tested.
Source, Page 145
The NTC Cat1 Medical Guidelines
  kowboyk1 Beginner

Thanks seb2351...
I had the lantern test and sadly failed that one too. The HR lady said not to give up hope just yet, but I can’t imagine any way I can do the job without passing the medical. I’m disappointed with the situation and with my eyesight deficiency but I know I can’t do anything to improve my colour blindness. I can’t study, I can’t try harder, it’s just how it is and I have to accept it. Thanks everyone for your well wishes
I don't want to get your hopes up, as they may see you as in the too-bard basket, but the below is a quote from the Cat1 guidelines, if you can explain it to the HR staff, they may be able to confirm it with Operations? If you have a driver's licence (which I'm guessing you do as pretty much every job needs it), you could argue you can already interpret traffic lights, and in turn, use the actual position of the illuminated lamp, rather than the colour, to determine the aspect, as described in the NTC guidelines?

Tram drivers usually have to use traffic lights similarly to vehicle drivers. Traffic lights have positional cues and hence redundancy of information, so colour vision is not required to be tested.
Source, Page 145
KRviator
wow, that is so informative and exactly my situation.  The HR have actually said they are trying to work out a dispensation for me and another applicant who is also colour blind and not to give up hope just yet....  So perhaps this is the area they are looking at for the dispo.  The job im applying for is in operations control, but part of the agreement says that ops controllers still need to be trained to drive a tram, so it wouldnt even be my primary duty, but still necessary for employment.  
Thanks so much for that info, im in the middle of trying to stay positive but also not get my hopes up - its a fine line hahaha

Sponsored advertisement

Subscribers: kowboyk1, KRviator, seb2351

Display from: