Why Facebook?

 
  NSW3802 Locomotive Fireman

Why do alot of manufacturers post any news or delivery updates on facebook, and not on the news section of their website.

There are many of us that don't use facebook, or want to use facebook but are still customers, and would like to get these updates.

Share the information.

Les.

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  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Yep they still think that is the best way of doing it but it isn't and google have really stopped indexing pages from facebook and facebook use has peaked and now in decline.
  brissim Chief Train Controller

And I think has been said a number of times now, you do not need a Facebook account in order to read the manufactures FB page.

You only need a FB account if you want to post anything on their FB page.

As to why manufacturers use Facebook - I think that's blindingly obvious. Its a platform that cost them next to nothing to have and maintain - unlike a website.

Tony
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia

As to why manufacturers use Facebook - I think that's blindingly obvious. Its a platform that cost them next to nothing to have and maintain - unlike a website.

Tony
brissim

There are global providers of websites like WIX
  meh Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
And I think has been said a number of times now, you do not need a Facebook account in order to read the manufactures FB page.

You only need a FB account if you want to post anything on their FB page.

As to why manufacturers use Facebook - I think that's blindingly obvious. Its a platform that cost them next to nothing to have and maintain - unlike a website.

Tony
brissim

Exactly, and at the end of the day they are getting great responses from it. It's much easier to use and maintain (as mentioned), costs as much as they want to invest into it, and it gives people the chance to directly message them. Also (this may be a stretch) but it can open the hobby up to new users who otherwise wouldn't have been interested.
Also, it has been said since I started in the hobby that they need to increase the number of younger people to keep it alive; what better way to cater for that new potential market than to advertise on places they use.

A side example is places like the NSW Rail Museum, who use social media for a lot of their marketing, and the result is increasing visitors to the museum and very fast sell-outs on their tour runs.

Was the same complaint had when manufacturers started only publishing online and not mailing out news updates? Could see people saying "There are many of us that don't use the internet, or want to use the internet but are still customers, and would like to get these updates."

I prefer the FB updates; Auscision are one of the pages highlighted on my feed so when they post an update I see it next time i go online.

Times change, markets change.
  BrentonGolding Chief Commissioner

Location: Maldon Junction

As to why manufacturers use Facebook - I think that's blindingly obvious. Its a platform that cost them next to nothing to have and maintain - unlike a website.

Tony
There are global providers of websites like WIX
bevans
Unless you are very clever and have loads of time on your hands doing updates to your own site is not easy. Most businesses pay someone else to do it and so don't do it too often.

FB or a blog on the other hand are child's play. You can reach a big audience (sure, maybe not as big as your own but your site can have an FB icon pointing visitors to your FB page) really quickly and easily. And yes, I am speaking from experience, not in the Model Railways field but in another industry where we sell online.

BG
  lkernan Assistant Commissioner

Location: Melbourne
As long as they keep them public so I can browse their news without an FB account I can live with it these days.
  x31 Chief Commissioner

Location: gallifrey
Facebook is full of people sharing photos of their dog and what they had for dinner.

It is the ultimate platform for narcissists.
  Oscar Train Controller

Can’t disagree with much of what’s been said already. FB has been indispensable for me researching the area and era I’m modelling. But for updates and so forth I’d rather see them on a News/Blog link. I’m not suggesting the manufacturers abandon one form over another, rather they use the news section as an adjunct to FB and emails. It saves from having to find FB posts that get buried in comments and other posts and emails that get lost in my unkept inbox.

When it’s all about promotion of a product and I’m modelling and collecting for an area and era I didn’t really witness, my modest collection of mags and books doesn’t really cover all I want to know.  Some RTR and kits will appear with little or no reference to where and when they ran and I’ll remain ignorant, unfortunately.  Of all my purchases over a number of years, quite often I’ll rely on a product announcement with blurb about the prototype by the manufacturer to get me interested in buying a wagon that I may not know existed let alone suits my layout. Along with delivery updates, I’d rather see all this in an easily accessible news link.

So yeah that’s my wish for Xmas, for manufacturers to utilise their News links and add prototype info, and I’d like a new motorbike and car but sigh...
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

A lot use Facebook pages simply because it is easier to add an update or change listings or what ever. A model shop here in Adelaides North has a website with a link to their facebook page with the note that it is easier to put changes up on the Facebook of model listings etc rather than try to post them up on the website. Which to me sounds fair enough, by the time a lot of places update their websites the actual update is old hat more or less.
  nswtrains Chief Commissioner

Why do alot of manufacturers post any news or delivery updates on facebook, and not on the news section of their website.

There are many of us that don't use facebook, or want to use facebook but are still customers, and would like to get these updates.

Share the information.

Les.
NSW3802
Smoke signals are no longer used.
  x31 Chief Commissioner

Location: gallifrey
You cannot build a shopfront on Facebook like you can on the web.
  kingfisher Chief Train Controller

You cannot build a shopfront on Facebook like you can on the web.
x31
Correct, but properly maintained they can complement each other.
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

You cannot build a shopfront on Facebook like you can on the web.
x31
This is true but then you can always add a link to a Facebook page to take you to their website to order what you want and pay for it. So as Kingfisher said they complement each other.
  SeanF Beginner

When you build a website for your business, you at least have some ownership of its content, apart from the web page designer and the domain name.

With FB, the content and the pictures, then become the property of FB. Many photographers despise plagiarism of their photos as they are not credited but the reality is that FB becomes the owner of your photos. They are added to their database, somewhere in the USA.
  Poath Junction Chief Commissioner

Location: In front of a computer most of the time.
When you build a website for your business, you at least have some ownership of its content, apart from the web page designer and the domain name.

With FB, the content and the pictures, then become the property of FB. Many photographers despise plagiarism of their photos as they are not credited but the reality is that FB becomes the owner of your photos. They are added to their database, somewhere in the USA.
SeanF
The only thing you got correct was "Many photographers despise plagiarism of their photos".

Don't take my word for it, read the Facebook Terms of service https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms/update?ref=old_policy  which clearly state "You own the content you create and share on Facebook "
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
When you build a website for your business, you at least have some ownership of its content, apart from the web page designer and the domain name.

With FB, the content and the pictures, then become the property of FB. Many photographers despise plagiarism of their photos as they are not credited but the reality is that FB becomes the owner of your photos. They are added to their database, somewhere in the USA.
The only thing you got correct was "Many photographers despise plagiarism of their photos".

Don't take my word for it, read the Facebook Terms of service https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms/update?ref=old_policy  which clearly state "You own the content you create and share on Facebook "
Poath Junction
Despite what the law says, there are people who blatantly screen copy images and repost as their own work, both for financial profit as well as ego. The profit situation is apparently by reposting on sites like ebay as postcards etc. Apparently the original watermarks can be removed with certain software.

This grubby activity predates the internet as apparently images from books have been reused (uncredited) in other books by less that ethical authors / publishers.

The bottom line is Facebook etc can have anything they like on their website regarding ownership but the grubs will still play dirty games.
  BrentonGolding Chief Commissioner

Location: Maldon Junction
Despite what the law says, there are people who blatantly screen copy images and repost as their own work, both for financial profit as well as ego. The profit situation is apparently by reposting on sites like ebay as postcards etc. Apparently the original watermarks can be removed with certain software.

This grubby activity predates the internet as apparently images from books have been reused (uncredited) in other books by less that ethical authors / publishers.

The bottom line is Facebook etc can have anything they like on their website regarding ownership but the grubs will still play dirty games.
petan
And you can do exactly the same thing with any image on a computer or in a book / catalogue for that matter. It is still a breach of copyright but as is the case with FB in most cases it is not worth pursuing.

One of our suppliers used to have all of their images copyright protected and if you tried to copy the image from their site it flagged up a warning and wouldn't let you do it. We got around that by simply using the "print screen" function and editing in Paint. (we were allowed to use them as an authorised distributor).

Soon after they removed the warning and block system as it was clearly pointless.

BG
  NSWRcars Chief Train Controller

While there’s few places worse for theft of photos, and it is a serious issue, I suggest that this isn’t such a problem or concern for manufacturers using fb (or their own web sites) to promote their products.
  The railway dog Junior Train Controller

I'm sure everyone's seen a report that "Blowfly Models are producing a ...." & wondered HTF do they find out about Blowfly Models? Well, with Facebook B M can set themselves up so they can be found.
But that's where the good bit ends, at least for those not on Facebook themselves. The issue of HTF do they actually contact & deal with B M? remains.
  c3526blue Deputy Commissioner

Location: in the cuckoos nest
I'm sure everyone's seen a report that "Blowfly Models are producing a ...." & wondered HTF do they find out about Blowfly Models? Well, with Facebook B M can set themselves up so they can be found.
But that's where the good bit ends, at least for those not on Facebook themselves. The issue of HTF do they actually contact & deal with B M? remains.
The railway dog
Who/what are HTF and B M?  I think I know, but still can't make much sense of the post.

Happy deciphering,

John

PS;  "The railway dog", please excuse my rant, I mean nothing personal against you.  I love American's use of acronyms without any explanation.  Anything they say instantly turns to gobble de gook.  This post is a classic example.  Almost unintelligible.  Another sad day for the English (Australian??) language.  Might as well be a text/SMS.  I can't understand most messages from my son, especially when predictive text is used.
  c3526blue Deputy Commissioner

Location: in the cuckoos nest
When you build a website for your business, you at least have some ownership of its content, apart from the web page designer and the domain name.

With FB, the content and the pictures, then become the property of FB. Many photographers despise plagiarism of their photos as they are not credited but the reality is that FB becomes the owner of your photos. They are added to their database, somewhere in the USA.
The only thing you got correct was "Many photographers despise plagiarism of their photos".

Don't take my word for it, read the Facebook Terms of service https://www.facebook.com/legal/terms/update?ref=old_policy  which clearly state "You own the content you create and share on Facebook "
Poath Junction
PJ, you are only presenting part of the policy.  I took the time to have a look at the rest of Section 3.3, quote as follows.

"To provide our services, though, we need you to give us some legal permissions to use that content.

Specifically, when you share, post, or upload content that is covered by intellectual property rights (like photos or videos) on or in connection with our Products, you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, and worldwide license to host, use, distribute, modify, run, copy, publicly perform or display, translate, and create derivative works of your content (consistent with your [i]privacy[/i] and [i]application[/i] settings). This means, for example, that if you share a photo on Facebook, you give us permission to store, copy, and share it with others (again, consistent with your settings) such as service providers that support our service or other Facebook Products you use."

In my view, although you still own the copyright you have given Farcebook the permission to do/publish your information wherever, whenever and however they wish.

Happy posting,

John
  The railway dog Junior Train Controller

c3526blue
In response to your critique of my earlier post

HTF: The first two words are "How the". I leave the third to your imagination, no point in giving everything away.

BM stands for the aforementioned Blowfly Models.

Hope this helps.
  BrentonGolding Chief Commissioner

Location: Maldon Junction
In my view, although you still own the copyright you have given Farcebook the permission to do/publish your information wherever, whenever and however they wish.

Happy posting,

John
c3526blue
Of course, otherwise FB couldn't function. But does that give a third party the right to nick your content and use it for themselves whether that be for profit or not?

BG
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
c3526blue, you need to consider what FB needs to do in order get you information out to the masses.

Guess what, an ISP hosting your website/images would much the same rights.

You can take a photo and send it to a magazine or paper, but if they don’t take permission to publish/reprint/use and distribute from you why are you giving them the image in the first place?

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