'Hopeless': Commuters slam new Sydney Metro trains over delays

 
Topic moved from News by bevans on 28 May 2019 08:12
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
From last year

In April 2018, the International Association of Public Transport announced that fully automated metro lines around the world had reached a combined 1,000km milestone. But which networks stand out in terms of performance, longevity and innovation?

The popularity of driverless metro lines has grown exponentially since the first one was inaugurated in 1981, in Kobe, Japan. Metros built since have had enviable records in safety, flexibility, punctuality, cost efficiency and overall passenger satisfaction, and no city that welcomed an automated metro line has ever reverted back to a conventional system.

In April, the International Association of Public Transport (UITP) Observatory of Automated Metros, the body commissioned to disseminate and share knowledge about automated metro lines, announced that driverless metros across the world have surpassed a total of 1,000km. The opening of the Pujiang Line in Shanghai, China helped achieved this milestone, and today there are 63 fully automated operation (FAO) lines in 42 cities across 19 countries in the world.

As important as the achievement is in itself, it’s the context and history that make it even more noteworthy. The first 500km of automated lines were built over the span of 29 years; once the technology was proven, it took only eight years to double that figure and get us where we are today. The UITP estimates (based on confirmed projects) that by 2025 there will be over 2,300km of fully automated metro lines in operation.

“In these 1,000km we find a diversity of profiles of lines and cities around the world,” UITP director of rail transport Laurent Dauby said in a press release. “This demonstrates the broad range of services that automated lines can offer to meet the mobility challenges for cities in the years ahead.”


Copenhagen: repeat winner of world’s best metro
Asia and Europe make up almost 75% of the kilometres of fully automated metro lines, while Europe is expected to host a further 26% of the growth expected over the next decade, mainly in conversion projects.

Some of the world’s best performing FAO lines are European, and Copenhagen is a case in point. The Danish capital has never known anything different: its entire underground system was designed with automation in mind from the very start. First opened in 2002, both Lines 1 and 2 won the World’s Best Metro award in 2008, 2009 and 2010.

The 21km-long network transports about 12,000 passengers every hour in one direction. The service is punctual 98.7% of the time, according to Wavestone data, and operates 24/7.

Each of its 22 stations have been designed by a renowned Italian team, who focused on allowing the maximum amount of natural light to seep through glass pyramid-style buildings, all the way to the subterranean platforms.

Works for a new metro extension (known as Cityringen in Danish) are now under way, and two new lines are expected to open in July 2019. Following in the footsteps of their predecessors, the design of the 17 new stations will allow in plenty of daylight, but with an added twist: Cityringen’s new metro stations will give the capital new urban spaces, complete with patches of greenery and bicycle parking.

Dubai Metro: maintaining a stellar reputation
When it opened in 2009, Dubai’s metro topped the list as the world’s longest automated rail system. It has since been demoted to third place, after Vancouver’s SkyTrain and Singapore, but its reputation as a sleek, reliable and highly modern public transit system has remained.

With a total length of 75km, Dubai’s Red and Green Lines have served more than one billion riders before the end of 2017. The metro is well known for high levels of safety, solid in-train and station-wide connectivity, state of the art NFC payments introduced in 2013, and for its trains that run like clockwork and arrive on time over 99% of the time.

The city’s municipality is keen to keep up this stellar reputation. Local media recently reported that owners of the buildings overlooking the elevated sections of Dubai Metro received official notices to undertake maintenance and beautification work on their exteriors, as part of a campaign to maintain Dubai’s aesthetic appearance. This is part of the preparations for Expo 2020, hosted in Dubai in two years’ time, which will see a huge number of foreign visitors head to the city and use its public transport network.

Plans to add four additional lines – the Blue, Purple, Pink and Gold services – will extend the network to 320km by 2020, which could be the longest in the world at that time.

Vancouver’s SkyTrain: world’s longest FOA
Vancouver’s automated Expo Line opened in 1985, making the city one of the first to adopt driverless trains. Today, Canadian passengers enjoy a reliable service across three lines – Expo, Canada and Millennium – on a network spanning nearly 80km and 53 stations.

The system’s name is derived from the panoramic views of the metropolitan area that can be seen from the train, which runs on elevated guideways outside Downtown Vancouver. It also runs across its very own SkyBridge, over the Fraser River, the world’s longest cable-supported transit-only bridge.

At the start of this year, Hyundai Rotem announced a new contract to increase capacity on the Canada Line with the supply of 24 new metro cars. This is after the regional transport authority TransLink reported that ridership grew by 6% last year.

Recently, the transport authority employed actor Morgan Freeman to do a number of voiceovers to be broadcast in Vancouver’s metro and bus stations as part of TransLink’s ‘Avoid Card Clash’ campaign. However, the promotion is currently suspended as a result of recent allegations of inappropriate behaviour against the Hollywood actor.

Paris’ Line 1: a golden standard in flexibility
When it comes to automated trains, the French know-how is almost unmatched: the European country is home to five of the world’s most advanced networks, in Paris, Lille, Rennes, Lyon and Toulouse and currently hosts 16% of the world’s kilometres of fully automated metro lines.

Paris is a leading example in terms of performance. It currently has two automated lines – 1 and 14 – but while Line 14 was originally designed to be driverless, Line 1 was converted later, without interruption to its service.

In 2015, Line 1 further proved its sturdiness and adaptability by taking on the increase in passengers when the RER A line was closed for planned works. Today, most of the stations on Line 1 have 3G and 4G coverage, while operator RATB has committed to digitalisation by carrying out tests on the projection of passenger flows in stations using big data.

Barcelona: Europe’s longest driverless metro
When Barcelona inaugurated its new, expanded driverless subway in 2016, Line 9/10 immediately gained the title of Europe’s longest, spanning 47.8km and 52 stations.

With 20 interconnection points that branch out to incorporate the local trams, high-speed trains and even reach the airport, the line serves a densely populated and economically dynamic area, which is home to three million people.

In 2015, Spanish operator TMB introduced NFC and mobile payments for the entire urban network, and passengers enjoy good 4G coverage. TMB also uses big data to predict and model passenger flows in stations.

Further construction works targeting the central section of the line have been on hold for a number of years, but last year local media reported that the Catalan Government was seeking a €740m loan from the European Investment Bank to finance the project, which does not yet have a fixed deadline.

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  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
As RTT has pointed out, it's working in many countries, and started 38 years ago.

All of that huge amount of knowledge and experience, and we're incapable of using it or learning from it.  We have another home grown fiasco, similar to Victoria's  Myki Card.

Instead of properly using proven technology, we seem, in this country, to be hell bent on re-inventing the wheel with the usual failure rate.
  duttonbay Minister for Railways


There is also
- Vancouver (all lines)
- Dubai
- Sao Paulo, line 4, 15 and 17
- Ontario
- Riyadh
- KL
- Barcelona,
- Nuremburg
- Paris, Line 1, soon to be Line 4, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18
- Budapest

etc etc etc etc

By the time the Western Metro is complete, expect the DD network to face driver automation, even if a guard is still required.
RTT_Rules
Ontario is a province. Which city are you referring to?
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

In the world of projects, free days or whatever in a different context, are the last stage of testing. Don't tell the free-riders, they may want to be paid. Wink
GrahamH
Always remember: if it's free, you ARE the product.
  Brianr Assistant Commissioner

Location: Dunedin, New Zealand
"- Paris, Line 1, soon to be Line 4, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18"Ligne 14 was opened as automatic in 1998. I first road on it on a visit in 2002 and, as I always stay near the current terminus Olympiades, I have travelled on it often. Ligne 1 was converted in 2013.  Ligne 4 is planned for 2023.
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE

There is also
- Vancouver (all lines)
- Dubai
- Sao Paulo, line 4, 15 and 17
- Ontario
- Riyadh
- KL
- Barcelona,
- Nuremburg
- Paris, Line 1, soon to be Line 4, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18
- Budapest

etc etc etc etc

By the time the Western Metro is complete, expect the DD network to face driver automation, even if a guard is still required.Ontario is a province. Which city are you referring to?
duttonbay
Toronto, actually the airport terminal so probably doesn't compare too much. I was told about it from someone from Toronto, he said airport train. I took that as train to airport.
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
As RTT has pointed out, it's working in many countries, and started 38 years ago.

All of that huge amount of knowledge and experience, and we're incapable of using it or learning from it.  We have another home grown fiasco, similar to Victoria's  Myki Card.

Instead of properly using proven technology, we seem, in this country, to be hell bent on re-inventing the wheel with the usual failure rate.
Valvegear
and I suspect most of them had bugs in their first week or so operation, I know Dubai did and it was a progressive opening to meet the govt targetted unconditional deadline. (in UAE, if the govt says its opening National Day or what ever magic day of Numbers, I think Red Line was 9-9-09, it opens that day, regardless of what you have in the back ground to make it work.
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
The other thing for which I will never forgive Gladys is pulling down the Monorail. I visit Sydney four or five times a year, and it used to be great for commuting around.
Valvegear
Yes, I also liked it. Ironically a building we stay in Sydney near Darling harbour has a big whole in it from the Monorail. How cool a dad would I have been had we stayed when the Monorail was running.

However if you walk the Monorail route now, you can almost see why it was removed, so much was in the way of something they have built since.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
and I suspect most of them had bugs in their first week or so operation, I know Dubai did and it was a progressive opening to meet the govt targetted unconditional deadline. (in UAE, if the govt says its opening National Day or what ever magic day of Numbers, I think Red Line was 9-9-09, it opens that day, regardless of what you have in the back ground to make it work.
"RTT_Rules"
Precisely the point I'm making. There have been bugs ironed out; why the hell don't we do the "ironed out" version here?
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

Ontario is a province. Which city are you referring to?
Toronto, actually the airport terminal so probably doesn't compare too much. I was told about it from someone from Toronto, he said airport train. I took that as train to airport.
RTT_Rules
The Union-Pearson Express is a DMU (although I haven't been to Toronto since it opened, so haven't seen or ridden it myself). There is an automatic people mover at the airport, connecting two terminals and the carpark - they are powered by a cable.
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
and I suspect most of them had bugs in their first week or so operation, I know Dubai did and it was a progressive opening to meet the govt targetted unconditional deadline. (in UAE, if the govt says its opening National Day or what ever magic day of Numbers, I think Red Line was 9-9-09, it opens that day, regardless of what you have in the back ground to make it work.
Precisely the point I'm making. There have been bugs ironed out; why the hell don't we do the "ironed out" version here?
Valvegear
There is a difference between design issues and local construction issues. Was a sensor placed in the right location etc etc.

They ran trains for weeks before, we all saw the videos so clearly it was working, empty. Placing humans on there appears to made things behave a bit differently and realistically, how many things have actually gone wrong?
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
Ontario is a province. Which city are you referring to?
Toronto, actually the airport terminal so probably doesn't compare too much. I was told about it from someone from Toronto, he said airport train. I took that as train to airport.
The Union-Pearson Express is a DMU (although I haven't been to Toronto since it opened, so haven't seen or ridden it myself). There is an automatic people mover at the airport, connecting two terminals and the carpark - they are powered by a cable.
duttonbay
Not the UP express
  ANR Assistant Commissioner

P.s. the timber extension platform at Millthorpe station should never have been built. Rather the line should have been moved adjacent to the platform. Country people should stop trying to placate Sydney-centric pollies and be timid or apologetic for not asking for much. Some cost cutting on the new SFS could have paid for the realignment.
  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
This thread has  been cleaned up after a clearly troll type comment. if you quoted it, your post was removed, if you talked about it, your post was removed.

Carry on.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
There is a difference between design issues and local construction issues. Was a sensor placed in the right location etc etc.
RTT_Rules
So we have to allow for the "Drongo who can't read a Drawing" factor. Anything wrongly placed is sheer incompetence.
We consider problems to be standard procedure, and we don't aim for "right first time." Why worry, the taxpayers are footing the bill.
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
There is a difference between design issues and local construction issues. Was a sensor placed in the right location etc etc.
So we have to allow for the "Drongo who can't read a Drawing" factor. Anything wrongly placed is sheer incompetence.
We consider problems to be standard procedure, and we don't aim for "right first time." Why worry, the taxpayers are footing the bill.
Valvegear
I would think an Aluminium smelter is inherently a more simpler project after all there are only a few different components and processes. However they still get this wrong to various levels of degree. Contractors not on time, project interface management issues, misunderstandings, lack of scope in contract, yes people installing something backwards etc etc.

Myself and a friend spent weeks trying to fault find a pneumatic transport system for basically dirt, worlds longest at the time. The $hit fight between the provider of the transport system and the bath crushing plant and what -20mm actually means and how its measured. My friend is a project guy and ex sparkie and can also PLC code, he asked them the west unit is fine, but the east unit has a problem, is it coded correctly. But no intermittent blockage after intermittent blockage. Runs then for some reason, blocked. He asked the contractor, is the coding the same, Yes! Many times, many times they said they checked.

Finally found the problem. Standing out side in 48C high humidity weather in woolen clothing, I heard the system start, like I've heard many times before, but the pressure dropped just as the material value opened. You could see it on the analogue gauge, but there was no Pressure Transmitter to record it and its only a fraction of a second dip, just long enough for 20mm material already in the pipe to slow down and block the line. Got my friend down, we waited 6h for it to do it again, one cycle every 45min, pending demand from the potline. As soon as he saw it, he yelled at the Germans to get their smeg to plant ASAP. They then went through the code, a decimal place was out somewhere.

Moral of the story, these days the "droggo's" work in the office with a laptop and millions of lines of code that is hidden away.  

Anyway, what are the problems today and yesterday, no delays?

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