DISCUSSION: Is the NSW Government too 'Sydney-Centric' with public transport?

 
  Ethan1395 Train Controller

Location: An OSCar H Set
We have all heard the expression 'Sydney-Centric' before;

I've talked about it before but I have been suprised about the existing problems that people manage to defend,
so, in the interest in starting a discussion since the forum has been pretty dry lately, I was wondering if anyone agreed that the NSW government is far too 'Sydney-Centric' with public transport.

Anyone who has ever seen my posts would know I agree that the NSW Government is far too 'Sydney-Centric' and here are some examples of the issues which result of this:

  • High Cost of Living: live in expensive Sydney housing and take public transport, or live in cheap non-Sydney housing and own 4 cars; end result is the same, a high cost of living.
  • High Unemployment outside of Sydney and no small business growth: small businesses can't afford the rent in the big shopping centres so the rely on foot traffic, and without public transport, there is very little foot traffic, meaning few small businesses, and fewer jobs overall.
  • Discimination in employment: in areas with usable public transport, many employers are reluctant to hire applicants without cars, but the only way to get a car without a job is to come form a rich family.


Most people would say just upgrade the intercity links to give more people access to the Sydney labour market, but all this does is put more pressure on an expensive and overcrowded Sydney (people are already almost falling off the platforms at Town Hall), and our other cities become vast fields of unemployment, and having to commute 3 hours one way for work can't be good for quality of life.
And realistically, besides the Newcastle light rail, can someone name ONE piece of local public transport infrastructure constructed outside of Sydney in the 21st century.

So I was wondering:

  • Who agrees that the NSW government is far too Sydney-Centric with public transport?
  • What can be done?
  • What should not be done?

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  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
The govt is building PT in Sydney to deal with the crowding in Sydney, as you said they are almost falling off the platforms at Town Hall, so building a LR project in Newcastle or Wollongong won't solve this. Remember +35,000 people a day or peak (cannot remember) use Town Hall.

The LR project in Newcastle should never have been built, the HR should have been left in place, so if common sense had taken place, no money would have been spent. However you forgot about the O/H extension to Kiama in 2001.

There is no point building infrastructure in places it won't be used.

What should be done is the Interurban corridors need to be further improved to reduce travel time, namely
- Mt Colah to Gosford
- Waterfall to Wollongong (and remove the bends Sutherland to Hurtsville and double track the whole way)
- Macurthur to Moss Vale
- Blue Mountains is more difficult, but needs to be reviewed

Capacity constraints in suburbia for these services also need to be removed.

Overall there should be a target of saving 30min minimum return a day from Gosford, Wollongong, Moss Vale and Mt Vic and enable to double the current number of services on all corridors.
  Travelling Hooker Locomotive Driver

Location: Follows the weather up and down the coast
Sure, public transport is concentrated on Sydney - that’s where the bulk of the population live and they pay a premium for having better access to things like transport, school, shops, hospitals, airports etc than in the regions.

That, said there is decent public transport in the larger regional cities like Newcastle, Wollongong, and the Central Coast.

If someone lives in say, Wagga, and is unhappy that there isn’t a 389 style bus swinging by their corner every 10 minutes, or a train pulling in every 5 or so minutes, pony up the extra $$$ and move somewhere that does.
  djf01 Chief Commissioner

There is no point building infrastructure in places it won't be used.
RTT_Rules

If you build infrastructure in a marginal electorate, or a non marginal electorate that results in a particular lobby group making generous donations to your re-election fund, there is most definitely a point.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Sure, public transport is concentrated on Sydney - that’s where the bulk of the population live and they pay a premium for having better access to things like transport, school, shops, hospitals, airports etc than in the regions.

That, said there is decent public transport in the larger regional cities like Newcastle, Wollongong, and the Central Coast.

If someone lives in say, Wagga, and is unhappy that there isn’t a 389 style bus swinging by their corner every 10 minutes, or a train pulling in every 5 or so minutes, pony up the extra $$$ and move somewhere that does.
Travelling Hooker
Tend to agree

I grew up on he Central Coast and later commuted to Sydney, not