DISCUSSION: Is the NSW Government too 'Sydney-Centric' with public transport?

 
  Ethan1395 Train Controller

Location: An OSCar H Set
Lausane  is 1/7 the physical size of Newcastle with extensive high density housing compared to Newcastles mostly detached house on black.

Cleveland and Lausane have something Newcastle doesn't, a city centre, makes it easy to run trains and buses if they have a common direction to go as you follow the route people want to go. Newcastle's employment base is geographically diversified.

Toronto line is dead because it requires a major level crossing.

Other lines, I have no idea, but would they attract the numbers required to justify their construction?
RTT_Rules
Hence the reason I said you couldn't justify the same level of service in those places as you could in Newcastle, I was just pointing out that you don't need populations on the millions to justify usable PT.
The city centre issue is somewhat true, but some Hunter Line services still run standing room only to the Newcastle CBD so there is still demand to go there, and having more stations on existing lines could somewhat solve issues with the geographically diversified employment base.

Before building new lines, we need to upgrade the existing lines to a usable level with several new stations at places like Kotara, Glendale, and the Newcastle TAFE, and make other stations accessible to make them usable, a new housing development went up next to the lightly patronized Cockle Creek station for example, but so did a large multi-lane roundabout, killing potential use for the station as it's inaccessible to pedestrians.
Could new lines attract the numbers required to justify construction and operation? make the existing line usable and that will give us our answer.

The Toronto line slopes down towards Carey St from the station, if the line sloped up (and mabye Carey St sloped down a little), it would be pretty easy to eliminate that level crossing.
Considering the fact that the Carlingford Line has been operating for all these years with it's bugger-all patroange, isolation, low frequency, and even worse level crossing, and the fact that it's future is a usable light rail line and not a rail trail - I would say that the Toronto Line is dead because it's unrelated to Sydney - but I am open for correction.

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  a6et Minister for Railways

Lausane  is 1/7 the physical size of Newcastle with extensive high density housing compared to Newcastles mostly detached house on black.

Cleveland and Lausane have something Newcastle doesn't, a city centre, makes it easy to run trains and buses if they have a common direction to go as you follow the route people want to go. Newcastle's employment base is geographically diversified.

Toronto line is dead because it requires a major level crossing.

Other lines, I have no idea, but would they attract the numbers required to justify their construction?
Hence the reason I said you couldn't justify the same level of service in those places as you could in Newcastle, I was just pointing out that you don't need populations on the millions to justify usable PT.
The city centre issue is somewhat true, but some Hunter Line services still run standing room only to the Newcastle CBD so there is still demand to go there, and having more stations on existing lines could somewhat solve issues with the geographically diversified employment base.

Before building new lines, we need to upgrade the existing lines to a usable level with several new stations at places like Kotara, Glendale, and the Newcastle TAFE, and make other stations accessible to make them usable, a new housing development went up next to the lightly patronized Cockle Creek station for example, but so did a large multi-lane roundabout, killing potential use for the station as it's inaccessible to pedestrians.
Could new lines attract the numbers required to justify construction and operation? make the existing line usable and that will give us our answer.

The Toronto line slopes down towards Carey St from the station, if the line sloped up (and mabye Carey St sloped down a little), it would be pretty easy to eliminate that level crossing.
Considering the fact that the Carlingford Line has been operating for all these years with it's bugger-all patroange, isolation, low frequency, and even worse level crossing, and the fact that it's future is a usable light rail line and not a rail trail - I would say that the Toronto Line is dead because it's unrelated to Sydney - but I am open for correction.
Ethan1395
The busiest line in the NCL area is those services to Telerah with the support services from Scone and Singleton, in both directions. There is a half hourly off peak service to Telerah. Not a lot on the Dungog trains to really justify their running except for School children, even the XPT services now get few passengers and there are 3 of those each direction daily.

There are usually very few people standing in any of those trains, my wife travels from Victoria st weekly sometimes more frequently, and asking her about that she has not seen many if any standing, the trains that skip stations and the other all stations services in off peak could be handled by a single DMU, only the peak ones only need the standard explorer sets, and many of those who use the train get off at Warabrook for the uni. The peak hour services are around half full at Wickham before getting on the trams.

Comparing the Toronto line with the Hunter line is not possible as the Toronto line would not get many to use it. you suggested 3-4 an hour, at best it would be 1 every two hours, the cost to reinstate the line along with the bridge, level crossing upgrade would never pay for these works.

Looking at the Carlingford line, it does not have the patronage today as it used to have, the primary reason is that for those who catch the trains in the past worked in the city, in earlier days there were two direct services from Carlo in the morning and back in the evening into the city during peak hours, with the shuttles as additional services throughout the day.  I don't know the patronage today but of the trains I have seen its not much, but they are off peak and the changing at Clyde for primarily slow trips to the city does not help its cause.

That lines useage has dropped dramatically since the loss of the many industrial works and the oil depots on the Camelia branch, where trains to/from Carlingford would be connecting services as well as that there were two suburban services, one morning an one in the afternoon for workers along that line, there were two platforms on it as well.

The trams may get more patronage owing to them having more stops and a decent interchange option with rail compared to the buses.. Still had HR remained those going into NCLE would have been at the terminus before the tram left Wickham

Many people would acknowledge your desire to see more and better PT, and I am one of them however, one has to look at reality in it all. The burden of cost to provide the infrastructure such as stations, and all have to have lifts, decent facilities, most no longer have toilets on them or open at limited times. The choosing of where those stations are best suited for those who may use them is ultra costly, and its also the maintenance of them as well, also the track and trains.

Of interest though as I have mentioned I live near Morpeth, in the past 6 months I have noticed one new subdivision start and houses in the process of construction in the area, each a distance from rail, there are also 2 others in the cut out stage as well, after many crackers and fanfare a slow start has been made on the new Maitland hospital, going on Metford Road located on the old PGH brickworks storage side of the road, the other side of the road where the works existed is now sporting fields and a big open dam. Once completed, there may be justification for a station to be built close