Removing Auscision 48/830's bodies?

 
  Oscar Train Controller

This is my second serious attempt to do it and I'm at a standstill. I haven't been able to find any info on experiences or advice on here or elsewhere. I've followed the instructions, studied the exploded diagrams, removed couplers and screws either side of them and will remove handbrake chain. I was hoping for a bit of body movement before I commit to that since the chain isn't holding the body on. But the body wont budge.

I saw there's two screws holding the fuel tank on. Previously I removed that to no avail and the instructions say to hold on to it anyway as you pull the body away vertically. I'm using a bit of force and am scared of knocking anything else off (lost a mirror and handrail came loose). I also noticed three tabs as pictured below on each side which look like they might be the culprit but I cannot push them in to release. I really don't know what I'm missing here, it's doing my head in. Any tips or advice? Do those tabs play a role here?


Sponsored advertisement

  Oscar Train Controller

Bit of an update, I had a brainwave and the idea the 45s might be the same so went on a search. A Liverpool Range blog entry describes the same procedure prior to removal and gives the impression it was fairly simple. A Barcoola video is interesting showing an easy body removal but with some wrestling beforehand with the couplers which revealed something I've neglected.  I haven't completely removed the coupler boxes ....



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GcxTCPdCGeA


I only removed the lids and knuckles.  The boxes wouldn't budge so I assumed they were cast into the chassis.




It was very tough to apply pressure to the boxes to free them. I pushed downwards first on the outer lip, (loco right way up), until it broke free, then pushed backwards on a few spots, till another click was heard and it broke free more. Plus I lost a few more bits to be glued on later. Regardless, there's clearly glue residue on the top side of the boxes and also the sides where they are positioned against those triangular bits, two of which broke off.




Not a big deal to fix, but, I still can't remove the body and although I can see some flex in the middle now, I think I can safely say there must be glue inadvertently placed around the ends that's holding the body down. BTW, I don't think the tabs have  anything to do with removing the body. I think they're there to hold the plastic walkways on. See pics at this ebay link https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/AUSCISION-NSWGR-48-SAR-AN-830-CUSTOM-SPEAKER-/173193629781
  Oscar Train Controller

I finally did it, prised the body from the chassis. It was clear that around the pilots or something at the ends was sticking. I started by placing a flatblade screwdriver into the recesses of the chassis where those aforementioned tabs are and turning the screwdriver up to 90degress, bit by bit going around doing the whole six.  Using a plastic tool of similar shape would've limited the amount of scratching you'll get.




I started going around the chassis, prying between the metal and the body. With some ticking and cracking, No2 end became free.



No1 end was the hardest.  The body was starting to come off at an angle which wasn't helping so I reset and tried to lever every spot evenly but No1 end, particularly the left corner was not letting go. I prised around the pilot, making sure the remaining triangular chassis/pilot braces weren't stuck to the pilot. In the end it was down to more and more levering between the chassis and walkway at the ends that produced a couple more ticks and a pop as the body separated. The No1 end left  corner and diagnoally opposite No2 had glue residue which appears to come from the corner triangular brace and leaks down into that chassis hole where the screws either side of the coupling box go. I reamed these holes with a tapered round file and placed the body on again, repeated disassembly a number of times and things improved a lot. But that there was my problem...



Outer edge of same area, bit of glue holding on there too.



BTW, in all that excitement of the body starting to budge I forgot to cut the handbrake chain Embarassed .... It broke off near the handbrake so no real damage done.
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

Ah yes the tight body sometimes it can be the paint holding it and on a friends Traino 930 years back it took 3 of us to get the body off the chassis, I jest not. They had assembled it with some parts still wet or tacky with paint and so when it dried the body is glued on almost. Then you have the fight you found to release it. So you are not the only one it has happened to.

But as you pointed out be very careful in removing it or lose some details. It is frustrating though and if you find yourself in this situation then take it slowly and if you get a bit cheesed off at it stop put it to one side and do something else and then come back to it. You are bound to lose something these days on a model as a lot of things are now made push fit rather than glued on, but once removed they will not then click back on but fall off some glue then has to be used.

I have had similar problems with a Auscision 422 where the paint on the coupler boxes held it on quite securely after the screw was released that well by the way that hauling a train was no problem even with the screw missing.

But paint wet or even tacky makes a good glue and capillary action also does not help either as glue or paint can also run into and along spaces with minute gaps between them.

Glad to see you got it off as well.

Oh and I think the chains on the handbrakes on these models is too big as well so if you can get some finer chain then you now have a reason to replace it. It might just be me but the chain looks like boat anchor chain in HO scale for a fishing type boat or similar.  Way too big the chain links are.
  Oscar Train Controller

Yeah I don't know what I'll do with that chain.  It's dangling off the side of the bogie for now. Only the big ring off the handbrake lever came undone so very easy to fix. I know what you mean by a bit oversize but if I'm honest it's one detail I've never really noticed on the prototype. I do remove bogie chains off rollingstock when they break free and may do the same here, not sure yet.

I gotta say though, I'm pretty amazed with the level of detail in general and how it all goes together. I mean that goes for any RTR for some time now but it took me 4 hours to get the 48 together again due to me being hamfisted and more bits flying off. Whilst I was doing my test fitting and reaming those holes out slightly the body got stuck again. I ended up pulling it apart without prying and when it let go suddenly, I was trying to limit how far my hands separated.  The result was both hands came together just as quick and the body smashed into the chassis like two cymbals coming together.  A few more parts went flying but amazingly nothing broke and everything eventually found it's place back on the model.  But at 4 hours, I'd hate to see how long it would take me to build one of these modern locos from scratch.
  Moses Wong Station Staff

See pics at this ebay link https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/AUSCISION-NSWGR-48-SAR-AN-830-CU...
Did you replace the speaker while you had the body off?

Cheers
MJW
  Oscar Train Controller

Did you replace the speaker while you had the body off?

Cheers
MJW

Nope. Mine are non speaker, all DC. This model has a surging issue only on a down slope with a load. Not a biggie but is noticeable to me and I wanted to check wiring and connections. All seems well under the bonnet so to speak so I'm leaving it as is for the moment and might revisit sometime way down the line.
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

The surging on DC might be caused by the weight of the train behind it pushing it down the hill, modern rolling stock is a lot more free rolling than older models. But on DC going up the grade it will slow down and then when going back down the grade will surge like you noticed, it will not harm the model though and is something on DC that just about any model does actually on grades, you just have to put up with it unfortunately. Some show it worse than others though.
  Oscar Train Controller

I'll have to take better observations when the surging occurs. It's not a single surge, rather it occurs periodically like the loco will go slightly faster than slower for a second and back and forth a few times then settles. It's definitely as the weight of the carriages push against the loco and there is an accordion effect as couplers slacken and bunch up again repeatedly.  But I'm almost certain it's happened when the loco is operated by itself too as well as being in a consist of say an AUSC 43. I'll have to take better notes.  I've tested with a gaugemaster and morley controller and the surging occurs at speeds say around below 50% to 75%.

I've got an AUSC 422 that had a loose connection on the main board that caused a slight bit of erratic running around curves which was easily fixed. I thought this 48 might have something similar but its connections are plugs as opposed to the push fit splice connectors (probably wrong terminology there) on the 422 and all checked out physically.

If not for loose connections in the loco I was thinking it may have something to do with what's on the board, or rather between pickups and motor. I may end up paralleling wires to bypass the board and run a pair from pickups to motor and post results.

EDIT; on either controller the 48 is very smooth on the level and uphill with smooth slow starts and decelerating to a stop, just like all the other modern stuff.
  Moses Wong Station Staff

I'll have to take better observations when the surging occurs. It's not a single surge, rather it occurs periodically like the loco will go slightly faster than slower for a second and back and forth a few times then settles. It's definitely as the weight of the carriages push against the loco and there is an accordion effect as couplers slacken and bunch up again repeatedly.  But I'm almost certain it's happened when the loco is operated by itself too as well as being in a consist of say an AUSC 43. I'll have to take better notes.  I've tested with a gaugemaster and morley controller and the surging occurs at speeds say around below 50% to 75%.

I've got an AUSC 422 that had a loose connection on the main board that caused a slight bit of erratic running around curves which was easily fixed. I thought this 48 might have something similar but its connections are plugs as opposed to the push fit splice connectors (probably wrong terminology there) on the 422 and all checked out physically.

If not for loose connections in the loco I was thinking it may have something to do with what's on the board, or rather between pickups and motor. I may end up paralleling wires to bypass the board and run a pair from pickups to motor and post results.

EDIT; on either controller the 48 is very smooth on the level and uphill with smooth slow starts and decelerating to a stop, just like all the other modern stuff.
Oscar
There is a history of motor issues with the 48's. I suggest taking it back to Auscision.

Cheers
MJW
  2LaGrange Train Controller

If the loco performs well on the flat, up hill slow speed ect but only has a surge going down a grade I would say there is nothing wrong at all with the motor. If there was an issue with the motor it would show up at low speed or up hill not just down hill.
As others have said it’s just the train forces pushing on loco. 48s are only small light loco and gearing/ backlash from the play in worm shaft in gear box and also the gear ratio could be part of it but not much you can do about that.
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

It might and this is a long shot just need a good running to bed everything down as well. Sometimes it can have a tight spot somewhere that could do what is described but a good running in session might cure the problem. If it has already been run in though, then there is or could be something else at play here, like oil or grease on pickups or a wire not soldered on properly, some solder joints from China are that cold they give you the chills almost. A cold solder joint or joints can work perfectly and then suddenly act up as the solder has not made a good joint and so it can do lots of strange things, to fix it a use a hot soldering iron to properly remake the joint. The solder should be a silvery colour for a good joint and a greyish dull colour for a cold joint as they are called. Sometimes even a wire comes off a pick up or something without you even touching anything, and the wire looks like it might have not even been soldered on. Got one like this a while back but check all solder joints as a cold solder joint can act like a resistor a bit and retard the flow of electrons in the wires.
  Oscar Train Controller

Apologies in advance for the long post but I thought I'd do some more comprehensive testing over the weekend before commenting any further and part of that involved unboxing another 48. But before I go on can I just say, man a couple of 48s heading a train looks good. I don't know how much thought goes into aesthetics when designing diesel locos as opposed to cars or some classic planes and wooden runabouts and what-not but 48s have always been a favourite of mine. I'd accept arguments that bulldogs look better but I dunno, maybe I just saw 48s everywhere as a kid. I bought 4 during the Auscision $220 preorder and wish I bought more.  I nearly unboxed the other two just to lash up the 4 hauling a wheatie...

But back to the surging thing. Thanks for the input fellas. MJW, I can't remember reading about AM 48s having motor issues but although some may have had problems I'd tend to agree with 2LaGrange that the way it behaves normally on a flat and uphill proves the motor is ok.

Regarding running in, 48158 has had a fair bit of running in and the biggest thing I noticed about the newly unboxed one, 48101, is how slower it was. Slower to start and slower top speed. Not by much, but I assume that will change given a chance to run it in too.

Now some test results. Consist is free running made up of fourteen carriages, mix of lima 12 wheelers, powerline and austrains bs/fs, casula EHO and CR and austrains LFXs and no pizza cutter wheels on the old stuff.  It's just an odd heavy mix I've been using to test track reliability but the surging was first noticed on a smaller rake. Downhill grade is 1 in 40 over approx 4 metres with large radius bend near the end.

  • The new 48101 doesn't exhibit the surge as much as 158. It's still there but not as bad. It may mimic 158 after it's been run in but that's not possible at the moment due to trackwork. Pffft, typical!
  • When I put 158 with 4303 leading which is a bit faster than 158, the surging is noticeable
  • 4303 and 101, some surging.
  • 4303 heading the rake has no surging.
  • If I put faster 42207 with 4303, there's no surging.
  • 101 and 158 together almost eliminate the surging.
  • No loco showed surging when running light down the grade.
  • When surging does occur it coincides as the carriages start to run on into the loco and will often occur repeatedly until the concertina affect from coupler slack and engine/s speeding and slowing down settle after the bottom of the grade.

All locos seem to have similar free movement in the geartrain from backlash. When viewed from above and a stationary loco is pushed forwards and backwards the distance moved is approximately that between sleepers on peco track.

I think it's fair to agree with those commenting on the 48s being a light loco, the backlash in gears and accepting the way it is. Remedies are to run in pairs or more for the heavy loads with out of the box speed matched locos, ie locos of the same type for DC operation, like keep the 48s together, or run a 48 or two on light consists. That's all fine and what I intend to do.

However, there's still a bit of an unanswered mystery to all of this I'd like to answer as I make this mole hill into a mountain. When the carriages run into the loco and the concertina thing happens the speed changes which are visibly and audibly noticeable are like a square wave form. If you can imagine the pitch of the motor the run on will see the shunt cause a rise in RPM, but when it drops it goes below where it eventually settles which is what it was originally set at. The carriages bunch up then the RPM increases, couplers slacken off then they close up again, the RPM drops below set speed and so on. When it settles the RPM returns to where it was set which is higher than the lowest it goes during the surgeing.  That's the bit I don't get.  I'd mention things like back EMF and filtering on the main board or in line with the motor but I've no idea what I'm talking about there. I still may try direct wiring between wheels and motor to note any difference, or just get on with life, I dunno, we'll see.
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

One other thing to look out for is if you are using a older DC controller some of these do not like modern motors in locomotives more so if it is the feedback type of controller from memory while it should not do any real damage it is just annoying to have it happen. Also matching locomotives even of the same model are few and far between each particular model loco seems to have a mind of their own, and it could well be that the electronics in a modern loco are causing it as well, it could also be a fault in the controller as well, a capacitor discharges or something, it could be that. If that is the case you might have to put up with it and turn a blind eye to it.

I have run just about all brands and types together of locomotives and some do as you have said while others run perfectly it is just a bit of hit or miss really in most cases. You will never get two locomotives to run perfectly together nor should you even try to do it as different motors and gearing all play their part in things. They can be used together though on the one train but each loco will do its own thing and as long as the locomotive is contributing to the actual pulling of the train then you should not have any problems.  But you will have to under take some more research into the problem to find a solution if there is any solution that is. But remember you will never get it dead perfect though even if you later change to DCC from normal DC running.

The weight of the test train might also have some bearing on it as well, the bit of slop in the gears might be doing it, that is the train moves the locomotive gears just a fraction but it is enough to do it as well.

But as long as the locomotive moves and you hear no excessive noise like gears screeching or sounds of something rubbing on something else then all should be well with it.
  Oscar Train Controller

Thanks DJ. Yeah I've relegated my two H&M duette controllers for future power supply duties after testing a newer loco last year on my first bit of laid track. Damn thing nearly flew off the layout with only a slight turn of the knob. Can't remember how the switches were set but I last used them at least 10 years ago. I did a lot of research since and read about failed insulation in resistance mats and just the fact they weren't designed for low current drawing motors.  So at the moment I'm using a Gaugemaster UDS, it's a panel controller with simulation that I've had for 15 years and a newly acquired Morley Vector. The surgeing thing happens on both and both are non feedback transistor based with ripple waveforms. I almost sound like I know what I'm talking about but I'm just repeating what I've read.

Generally I've found heavier full cab locos and my steam locos don't surge.  I previously tried to video what I was going on about but it didn't translate well.  But yesterday I halved the length of the passenger rake to 7 and found the surge a bit more pronounced in 48158 which surprised me.  So with this shorter rake it might be possible to demonstrate the surge on video. Depends if I find a technical work around to do a before and after.  Failing that, my end goal is to make up trains with locos permanently attached and it wont be too hard to match a few 48s to suitable prototypical loads that are not so free rolling. But yeah, as you've said, the free rolling capability and weight is what starts the whole thing happening.
  GoldenGirl Station Master

Thanks DJ. Yeah I've relegated my two H&M duette controllers for future power supply duties after testing a newer loco last year on my first bit of laid track. Damn thing nearly flew off the layout with only a slight turn of the knob. Can't remember how the switches were set but I last used them at least 10 years ago. I did a lot of research since and read about failed insulation in resistance mats and just the fact they weren't designed for low current drawing motors.  So at the moment I'm using a Gaugemaster UDS, it's a panel controller with simulation that I've had for 15 years and a newly acquired Morley Vector. The surgeing thing happens on both and both are non feedback transistor based with ripple waveforms. I almost sound like I know what I'm talking about but I'm just repeating what I've read.

Generally I've found heavier full cab locos and my steam locos don't surge.  I previously tried to video what I was going on about but it didn't translate well.  But yesterday I halved the length of the passenger rake to 7 and found the surge a bit more pronounced in 48158 which surprised me.  So with this shorter rake it might be possible to demonstrate the surge on video. Depends if I find a technical work around to do a before and after.  Failing that, my end goal is to make up trains with locos permanently attached and it wont be too hard to match a few 48s to suitable prototypical loads that are not so free rolling. But yeah, as you've said, the free rolling capability and weight is what starts the whole thing happening.
Oscar
H&M and any other rheostat based controller had to be designed by selecting the correct value of rheostat resistance, and this comes from knowing the voltage and current characteristics of the motor to be controlled. The voltage is pretty easy, 12 to 15 volts, and in the past, so was the current, 1 to 1.5 amperes. But modern motors start off with as little as 0.1 ampere at around 3 to 5 volts.

All this says is that those old resistance conteollers are totally unsuitable for modern locomotives, much better to buy a proper voltage controlled solid state controller, where the output voltage is controlled. In theory, you should be able to make and old resistance controller work better by changing the rheostat, but try to buy one today!
  Oscar Train Controller

Totally agree. I read earlier in the year about different resistance mats were available and actually saw two on ebay in Aus around the same time. Amazingly the duettes and clippers come up for sale occasionally and fetch a good price. I bought mine on ebay for under or around $90-100 each yonks ago but two duettes recently went for $159 and $178 Shocked  They look the part but I agree, there's far better options like you say for modern stuff.

It's amazing how many people love their duettes, including me up until last year. They worked faultlessly on early Austrains and lima pancakes but not my new gear. I could test again with the wave and resistance switches but it's not worth it.  Really happy with the Gaugemaster and Morley at the moment.
  Moses Wong Station Staff

Apologies in advance for the long post but I thought I'd do some more comprehensive testing over the weekend before commenting any further and part of that involved unboxing another 48. But before I go on can I just say, man a couple of 48s heading a train looks good. I don't know how much thought goes into aesthetics when designing diesel locos as opposed to cars or some classic planes and wooden runabouts and what-not but 48s have always been a favourite of mine. I'd accept arguments that bulldogs look better but I dunno, maybe I just saw 48s everywhere as a kid. I bought 4 during the Auscision $220 preorder and wish I bought more.  I nearly unboxed the other two just to lash up the 4 hauling a wheatie...

But back to the surging thing. Thanks for the input fellas. MJW, I can't remember reading about AM 48s having motor issues but although some may have had problems I'd tend to agree with 2LaGrange that the way it behaves normally on a flat and uphill proves the motor is ok.

Regarding running in, 48158 has had a fair bit of running in and the biggest thing I noticed about the newly unboxed one, 48101, is how slower it was. Slower to start and slower top speed. Not by much, but I assume that will change given a chance to run it in too.

Now some test results. Consist is free running made up of fourteen carriages, mix of lima 12 wheelers, powerline and austrains bs/fs, casula EHO and CR and austrains LFXs and no pizza cutter wheels on the old stuff.  It's just an odd heavy mix I've been using to test track reliability but the surging was first noticed on a smaller rake. Downhill grade is 1 in 40 over approx 4 metres with large radius bend near the end.

  • The new 48101 doesn't exhibit the surge as much as 158. It's still there but not as bad. It may mimic 158 after it's been run in but that's not possible at the moment due to trackwork. Pffft, typical!
  • When I put 158 with 4303 leading which is a bit faster than 158, the surging is noticeable
  • 4303 and 101, some surging.
  • 4303 heading the rake has no surging.
  • If I put faster 42207 with 4303, there's no surging.
  • 101 and 158 together almost eliminate the surging.
  • No loco showed surging when running light down the grade.
  • When surging does occur it coincides as the carriages start to run on into the loco and will often occur repeatedly until the concertina affect from coupler slack and engine/s speeding and slowing down settle after the bottom of the grade.

All locos seem to have similar free movement in the geartrain from backlash. When viewed from above and a stationary loco is pushed forwards and backwards the distance moved is approximately that between sleepers on peco track.

I think it's fair to agree with those commenting on the 48s being a light loco, the backlash in gears and accepting the way it is. Remedies are to run in pairs or more for the heavy loads with out of the box speed matched locos, ie locos of the same type for DC operation, like keep the 48s together, or run a 48 or two on light consists. That's all fine and what I intend to do.

However, there's still a bit of an unanswered mystery to all of this I'd like to answer as I make this mole hill into a mountain. When the carriages run into the loco and the concertina thing happens the speed changes which are visibly and audibly noticeable are like a square wave form. If you can imagine the pitch of the motor the run on will see the shunt cause a rise in RPM, but when it drops it goes below where it eventually settles which is what it was originally set at. The carriages bunch up then the RPM increases, couplers slacken off then they close up again, the RPM drops below set speed and so on. When it settles the RPM returns to where it was set which is higher than the lowest it goes during the surgeing.  That's the bit I don't get.  I'd mention things like back EMF and filtering on the main board or in line with the motor but I've no idea what I'm talking about there. I still may try direct wiring between wheels and motor to note any difference, or just get on with life, I dunno, we'll see.
Oscar
What is the current draw for each of the locos measured running light and then under load?

Regards
MJW
  Oscar Train Controller

I'm glad you asked MJW, kind of. A simple couple of measurements saw me plunging down a rabbit hole measuring a whole bunch of locos and loads and now I'm stuck with the tedious task of entering the data into a table. I measured volts and amps on the flat, down grade and up, loaded and light engine, half and full speed.

The results were interesting but to put things as brief as I can, particularly relating to the two 48s, in a nutshell - 48158 uses less current than the newer just out of the box 48101 in all tests, which is slower to start. It'll be interesting to see if it matches 158 when it does get a chance to run in.

A quick comparison for no load on the flat between 158 and 101 and a run in Auscision 422 at half speed was 75mA/107mA/98mA and for full speed, 99mA/129mA/151mA. For the 48s when loaded with 7 cars at half speed was 83mA/106mA and for full 123mA/154mA. The 422 with 14 cars measured 115 and 162mA.

The big thing I discovered was that the Austrains 80s and 442, which I considered as modern models when talking about motors, draw up to twice as much. For light engine on the flat at half speed 8047, 8028 and a 442 measured 218/196/165mA. Full speed measured 320/313/200mA. I didn't do any uphill or loads as the DMM measuring current is fused at 300mA so I stopped and looked at some steam which compared well to the other modern diesel Auscision/TOR stuff based on motor size.  I have one Lima left from years ago, 42213. I was surprised the pancake's readings weren't as bad as I thought they'd be, 180mA at half speed. But I forgot how those pizza cutter wheels bounce on code 75 sleepers or spikes, so no more testing there.

Lastly, I didn't do any stall current tests because that's how I cracked a gear on a TOR 47cl a number of years back. Regardless of those cracked muff gear issues, I don't see the point of stressing the drivetrain like that.
  Moses Wong Station Staff

I'm glad you asked MJW, kind of. A simple couple of measurements saw me plunging down a rabbit hole measuring a whole bunch of locos and loads and now I'm stuck with the tedious task of entering the data into a table. I measured volts and amps on the flat, down grade and up, loaded and light engine, half and full speed.

The results were interesting but to put things as brief as I can, particularly relating to the two 48s, in a nutshell - 48158 uses less current than the newer just out of the box 48101 in all tests, which is slower to start. It'll be interesting to see if it matches 158 when it does get a chance to run in.

A quick comparison for no load on the flat between 158 and 101 and a run in Auscision 422 at half speed was 75mA/107mA/98mA and for full speed, 99mA/129mA/151mA. For the 48s when loaded with 7 cars at half speed was 83mA/106mA and for full 123mA/154mA. The 422 with 14 cars measured 115 and 162mA.

The big thing I discovered was that the Austrains 80s and 442, which I considered as modern models when talking about motors, draw up to twice as much. For light engine on the flat at half speed 8047, 8028 and a 442 measured 218/196/165mA. Full speed measured 320/313/200mA. I didn't do any uphill or loads as the DMM measuring current is fused at 300mA so I stopped and looked at some steam which compared well to the other modern diesel Auscision/TOR stuff based on motor size.  I have one Lima left from years ago, 42213. I was surprised the pancake's readings weren't as bad as I thought they'd be, 180mA at half speed. But I forgot how those pizza cutter wheels bounce on code 75 sleepers or spikes, so no more testing there.

Lastly, I didn't do any stall current tests because that's how I cracked a gear on a TOR 47cl a number of years back. Regardless of those cracked muff gear issues, I don't see the point of stressing the drivetrain like that.
Oscar
Thanks Oscar. The current draw results are within the expected range. So put it down to gear train clearance.

Cheers
MJW
  Shazam75 Chief Commissioner

Hi Oscar
Have you seen this:

Motor Auto Tune Procedure

Should you encounter any running performance issues the following Auto Motor Tune procedure may help resolve the problem. This feature will automatically adjust the Motors Back-EMF in most cases. This is not meant to be a “cure all” solution. In most cases this will be all that is required, however there still may be the need to perform some manual adjustments. In order to use this automatic adjustment you will first need to place your locomotive on a section of track paying attention to the set direction of travel. Set CV 54 to a value of 0. Activate function F1. (Be sure to have plenty of clear space ahead of your locomotive. You will need at least 2 meters of available track) Your locomotive will quickly take off at full speed and then stop while reading the motor responses. This will automatically set the load compensation in CVs 52, CV 53, CV 54, and CV 55. From here you can make any other manual adjustments if needed. Refer Loksound Select manual chapters 5.2.2 for full motor adjustment details.

from: http://www.auscisionmodels.com.au/PDFs/Auscision%20HO%20Scale%2048-830%20class%20DCC%20Operating%20Information%20v4.pdf

Regards
Shelton
  Moses Wong Station Staff

Hi Oscar
Have you seen this:

Motor Auto Tune Procedure

Should you encounter any running performance issues the following Auto Motor Tune procedure may help resolve the problem. This feature will automatically adjust the Motors Back-EMF in most cases. This is not meant to be a “cure all” solution. In most cases this will be all that is required, however there still may be the need to perform some manual adjustments. In order to use this automatic adjustment you will first need to place your locomotive on a section of track paying attention to the set direction of travel. Set CV 54 to a value of 0. Activate function F1. (Be sure to have plenty of clear space ahead of your locomotive. You will need at least 2 meters of available track) Your locomotive will quickly take off at full speed and then stop while reading the motor responses. This will automatically set the load compensation in CVs 52, CV 53, CV 54, and CV 55. From here you can make any other manual adjustments if needed. Refer Loksound Select manual chapters 5.2.2 for full motor adjustment details.

from: http://www.auscisionmodels.com.au/PDFs/Auscision%20HO%20Scale%2048-830%20class%20DCC%20Operating%20Information%20v4.pdf

Regards
Shelton
Shazam75
Shelton,
From reading the posts, I believe Oscar runs DC.
Auto tune works on DCC and it adjusts the decoder BEMF parameters.

Cheers
MJW
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

Hi Oscar
Have you seen this:

Motor Auto Tune Procedure

Should you encounter any running performance issues the following Auto Motor Tune procedure may help resolve the problem. This feature will automatically adjust the Motors Back-EMF in most cases. This is not meant to be a “cure all” solution. In most cases this will be all that is required, however there still may be the need to perform some manual adjustments. In order to use this automatic adjustment you will first need to place your locomotive on a section of track paying attention to the set direction of travel. Set CV 54 to a value of 0. Activate function F1. (Be sure to have plenty of clear space ahead of your locomotive. You will need at least 2 meters of available track) Your locomotive will quickly take off at full speed and then stop while reading the motor responses. This will automatically set the load compensation in CVs 52, CV 53, CV 54, and CV 55. From here you can make any other manual adjustments if needed. Refer Loksound Select manual chapters 5.2.2 for full motor adjustment details.

from: http://www.auscisionmodels.com.au/PDFs/Auscision%20HO%20Scale%2048-830%20class%20DCC%20Operating%20Information%20v4.pdf

Regards
Shelton
Shelton,
From reading the posts, I believe Oscar runs DC.
Auto tune works on DCC and it adjusts the decoder BEMF parameters.

Cheers
MJW
Moses Wong
Yes but I have had locos that have had a DCC decoder fitted and all set up for DCC running but then when on DC the thing goes that slow that a HO sized person could walk faster. The settings on the decoder can affect the DC operation of a loco if it has at some time been on a DCC layout or test track. So it could be that doing something. Once the DCC decoder is returned to factory settings it clears the settings in the decoder and allows a much faster top speed. The loco I had on my work bench was not mine but it was DCC equipped and the owner only ran it on his DC layout but he lent it to a friend to use on a DCC layout and that is where the trouble started. Once reset it ran perfectly again on DC.

Yes I know it should not do it, but it did.
  Moses Wong Station Staff

Hi Oscar
Have you seen this:

Motor Auto Tune Procedure

Should you encounter any running performance issues the following Auto Motor Tune procedure may help resolve the problem. This feature will automatically adjust the Motors Back-EMF in most cases. This is not meant to be a “cure all” solution. In most cases this will be all that is required, however there still may be the need to perform some manual adjustments. In order to use this automatic adjustment you will first need to place your locomotive on a section of track paying attention to the set direction of travel. Set CV 54 to a value of 0. Activate function F1. (Be sure to have plenty of clear space ahead of your locomotive. You will need at least 2 meters of available track) Your locomotive will quickly take off at full speed and then stop while reading the motor responses. This will automatically set the load compensation in CVs 52, CV 53, CV 54, and CV 55. From here you can make any other manual adjustments if needed. Refer Loksound Select manual chapters 5.2.2 for full motor adjustment details.

from: http://www.auscisionmodels.com.au/PDFs/Auscision%20HO%20Scale%2048-830%20class%20DCC%20Operating%20Information%20v4.pdf

Regards
Shelton
Shelton,
From reading the posts, I believe Oscar runs DC.
Auto tune works on DCC and it adjusts the decoder BEMF parameters.

Cheers
MJW
Yes but I have had locos that have had a DCC decoder fitted and all set up for DCC running but then when on DC the thing goes that slow that a HO sized person could walk faster. The settings on the decoder can affect the DC operation of a loco if it has at some time been on a DCC layout or test track. So it could be that doing something. Once the DCC decoder is returned to factory settings it clears the settings in the decoder and allows a much faster top speed. The loco I had on my work bench was not mine but it was DCC equipped and the owner only ran it on his DC layout but he lent it to a friend to use on a DCC layout and that is where the trouble started. Once reset it ran perfectly again on DC.

Yes I know it should not do it, but it did.
DJPeters
DJPeters
Yes but................
These locos are DC. No decoder fitted.
Cheers
MJW

Sponsored advertisement

Subscribers: Moses Wong

Display from: