Consecutive space launch live streams

 
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

Two days in a row will see launches to the International Space Station with live streams.

First up tonight (lift-off at 1605 UTC, 0105 local time, 0135 ACST, 0205 AEST) is HTV-8, the eighth unmanned supply mission to the ISS to be launched by a Japanese H-IIB rocket out of their Yoshinobu Launch Complex.

Tomorrow night (lift-off at 1357 UTC, 1957 local time, 2327 ACST, 2357 AEST) is ISS Expedition 61S, a crew transport to the ISS on a Soyuz-FG rocket out of the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

The most interesting dimension to this scheduling is that the Soyuz will actually get to the ISS first despite having been launched 22 hours later.

Both launches, and the subsequent dockings at the ISS, will be streamed by the Japanese and Russian agencies doing the launches, plus an English version at https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

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  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
Two days in a row will see launches to the International Space Station with live streams.

First up tonight (lift-off at 1605 UTC, 0105 local time, 0135 ACST, 0205 AEST) is HTV-8, the eighth unmanned supply mission to the ISS to be launched by a Japanese H-IIB rocket out of their Yoshinobu Launch Complex.

Tomorrow night (lift-off at 1357 UTC, 1957 local time, 2327 ACST, 2357 AEST) is ISS Expedition 61S, a crew transport to the ISS on a Soyuz-FG rocket out of the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

The most interesting dimension to this scheduling is that the Soyuz will actually get to the ISS first despite having been launched 22 hours later.

Both launches, and the subsequent dockings at the ISS, will be streamed by the Japanese and Russian agencies doing the launches, plus an English version at https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive
justapassenger
Of interest, 61S is carrying the first UAE National Astronaut. Yes the UAE govt bought the seat on the rocket and training and will undertake a series of scientific experiments.

The ISS orbit (51deg??) was designed to be readily and quickly accessible from both Cape Canaveral and Baikonur ( so the Russians didn't have their first stage falling back on China) Therefore others may have to do a few laps to maneuver into position to approach the ISS.

Also of interest are the rules for a rocket going to the ISS, crewed or not. Only NASA approved is allowed anywhere near it and the entire design needs to be approved by NASA. SpaceX didn't even have their logo on their Dragon capsule for a few launches because the black paint they used wasn't approved. Also if a freight only launch basically has to have a faultless launch. SpaceX had a single main engine failure on 1st stage on one mission and this was enough to force a full abort.
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

The ISS orbit (51deg??) was designed to be readily and quickly accessible from both Cape Canaveral and Baikonur ( so the Russians didn't have their first stage falling back on China) Therefore others may have to do a few laps to maneuver into position to approach the ISS.
RTT_Rules
I should have expanded on this a little.

The slow approach for HTV-8 has been chosen deliberately due to that launch window and the SM-15 launch window tonight coming so close together. If there wasn't a need to give the crew flight priority for a fast approach, HTV-8 could have used a faster approach profile.

Yoshinobu is located at a latitude of 30°24'N, which gives it pretty well the same conditions for launching to the ISS as Cape Canaveral (28°31'N). Both sites can launch on the north-east leg or the south-east leg of the orbit without requiring major cross-range manoeuvring, they just need to wait for the launch windows to roll around every couple of weeks.

Baikonur's days of involvement with the ISS program are limited. In addition to ULA and SpaceX working on developing crew capsules, ESA is working on adding crewed flight facilities at Centre Spatial Guyanais (located close enough to right on the equator at 5°13'N) which would allow the proven Soyuz crew capsules to be launched from Guiana, just as unmanned Soyuz flights to inclined equatorial orbits and geostationary orbits have been doing for nearly ten years now.
  RTT_Rules Dr Beeching

Location: Dubai UAE
The ISS orbit (51deg??) was designed to be readily and quickly accessible from both Cape Canaveral and Baikonur ( so the Russians didn't have their first stage falling back on China) Therefore others may have to do a few laps to maneuver into position to approach the ISS.
I should have expanded on this a little.

The slow approach for HTV-8 has been chosen deliberately due to that launch window and the SM-15 launch window tonight coming so close together. If there wasn't a need to give the crew flight priority for a fast approach, HTV-8 could have used a faster approach profile.

Yoshinobu is located at a latitude of 30°24'N, which gives it pretty well the same conditions for launching to the ISS as Cape Canaveral (28°31'N). Both sites can launch on the north-east leg or the south-east leg of the orbit without requiring major cross-range manoeuvring, they just need to wait for the launch windows to roll around every couple of weeks.

Baikonur's days of involvement with the ISS program are limited. In addition to ULA and SpaceX working on developing crew capsules, ESA is working on adding crewed flight facilities at Centre Spatial Guyanais (located close enough to right on the equator at 5°13'N) which would allow the proven Soyuz crew capsules to be launched from Guiana, just as unmanned Soyuz flights to inclined equatorial orbits and geostationary orbits have been doing for nearly ten years now.
justapassenger
Thanks for that.

Its not about latitude on Earth the rockets are taking off from its the angle of which the ISS orbits the earth. If I recall where I read it I think it said inclination was 51 degrees, which was ideal for both the yanks and Russians and prevented the Russians from having to drop the 1st stage back on China and allowed a fast approach and emergency exit should it be required back to Earth.

I don't have anymore detail right now, I'll see if I can find again.

The Russian Work horse has proven to be one of the most successful and lowest cost rockets of all time and certainly help overcome the Shuttles deficiencies and early termination without affecting the ISS too much.
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

Thanks for that.

Its not about latitude on Earth the rockets are taking off from its the angle of which the ISS orbits the earth. If I recall where I read it I think it said inclination was 51 degrees, which was ideal for both the yanks and Russians and prevented the Russians from having to drop the 1st stage back on China and allowed a fast approach and emergency exit should it be required back to Earth.
RTT_Rules
The ISS uses an inclined equatorial orbit, which means that latitude is everything when it comes to launch sites.

On each orbit (every 93 minutes) the ground track of the ISS:
- starts at the equator
- heads north-east up to a latitude of 51.64°N
- heads south-east to cross the equator and go all the way down to 51.64°S
- heads north-east again towards the equator, crossing about 2550km to the west of its previous ascending (northbound) crossing of the equator

Any launch site within those latitudes can launch directly to an ISS approach orbit without cross-range manoeuvres, they just need to wait until the time when there is an ISS orbit path crossing overhead. Cross-range manoeuvres require carrying extra fuel, and every kilogram of fuel carried is a kilogram of payload which cannot be carried.

There are a number of advantages to the other launch sites used for ISS missions - Cape Canaveral, Yoshinobu, Wallops Island, Guiana. All four are located next to the coast so they don't have the flight path restrictions that apply to Baikonur, and all four are much closer to the equator which allows for heavier payloads to be carried
  arctic Deputy Commissioner

Location: Zurich
Two days in a row will see launches to the International Space Station with live streams.

First up tonight (lift-off at 1605 UTC, 0105 local time, 0135 ACST, 0205 AEST) is HTV-8, the eighth unmanned supply mission to the ISS to be launched by a Japanese H-IIB rocket out of their Yoshinobu Launch Complex.

Tomorrow night (lift-off at 1357 UTC, 1957 local time, 2327 ACST, 2357 AEST) is ISS Expedition 61S, a crew transport to the ISS on a Soyuz-FG rocket out of the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

The most interesting dimension to this scheduling is that the Soyuz will actually get to the ISS first despite having been launched 22 hours later.

Both launches, and the subsequent dockings at the ISS, will be streamed by the Japanese and Russian agencies doing the launches, plus an English version at https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive
Of interest, 61S is carrying the first UAE National Astronaut. Yes the UAE govt bought the seat on the rocket and training and will undertake a series of scientific experiments.

The ISS orbit (51deg??) was designed to be readily and quickly accessible from both Cape Canaveral and Baikonur ( so the Russians didn't have their first stage falling back on China) Therefore others may have to do a few laps to maneuver into position to approach the ISS.

Also of interest are the rules for a rocket going to the ISS, crewed or not. Only NASA approved is allowed anywhere near it and the entire design needs to be approved by NASA. SpaceX didn't even have their logo on their Dragon capsule for a few launches because the black paint they used wasn't approved. Also if a freight only launch basically has to have a faultless launch. SpaceX had a single main engine failure on 1st stage on one mission and this was enough to force a full abort.
RTT_Rules
If this was CRS-1 then it was the secondary payload that was not put in the required orbit. The primary mission of berthing with the ISS and delivering the supplies was successful despite the single engine failure.

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