Old cement siding at Albion?

 
  trainbrain Chief Commissioner

One of the  best forums I have read in a long long time..................

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  Shazam75 Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisbane
Hi Dave

Was the run to the ICI factory to pick up loads to fill into the P Vans?  or were they already loaded and heading to the factory to be unloaded?
I didnt realise condemned wagons were to used for spacing!

Here is another photo - but this time we see GYs with loads from Massey Ferguson:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2IIr2I1SkiySWVCakR1X2V3bXRBckFTYWgwY3B0RTRmZ3Fn/view?usp=sharing

Regards
  david harvey Chief Train Controller

Location: Upper Kumbuctor West
Was the run to the ICI factory to pick up loads to fill into the P Vans?  or were they already loaded and heading to the factory to be unloaded?
The  ICI factory may have used the railway to import loading at sometime ,but in the time fame of the early 1980s as far as I could tell the P Vans  were used to take out produce from the factory. Some of the out wards loading were railway detonators which where placed upon the tracks and run over by a train they go ,bang warning the train crew of incident ahead.

I would Just like to say that  the wagons were not condemned wagons or else they wouldn't be allowed out of the yard . The wagons that were used pehaps had faults and were Blue carded(somebody else can explain this) and could'nt have  have loading any more for which they were designed for.,so the found a new purpose as a safety wagon , .Its a bit like how a shunter rides on a match truck attached to a shunting loco in New South Wales . The shunter doesn't have to mount the loco and the driver has a clear view of him. The shunters wagon started its life out as something else ,a bit like a GH wagon was a GY before it was G .  
  Shazam75 Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisbane
Speaking of the Pilot working to the ICI - here is a photo of such working - looks like it is on its return journey - and it is Y109 again!

Also interesting to see a CP van attached - I thought they were for fast goods workings  - obviously must be the advent of dropping Guards Vans on freight trains.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/doctorjbeam/7170906069/in/photolist-bVELxx

Regards
Shelton
  ngarner Assistant Commissioner

Location: Seville
That's an interesting photo, Shelton, especially as the P van is coupled directly to the CP. This has to mean that the P is empty, since as David wrote there had to be four safeties between loaded P vans and that also included the loco and guards van. Loaded Ps were not supposed to be put over Melbourne hump nor loose shunted; they were supposed to remain coupled to a loco at all times during shunting, because of their contents. If I remember correctly they had this painted on their ends in large white letters.
Digging through my diaries I only worked one train to Deer Park, which I would have to say was the ICI pilot, as I remember shunting there.
November 1979, T361 was run light from Dynon to Tottenham, where the load was picked up departing that yard at midday we made our way to Deer Park. Once shunting was complete we returned the load to Melbourne yard. As David wrote the load would have been safety wagons with P vans evenly spaced through the train. His comment about it being out-bound loading makes sense as explosives were made at ICI. Any inbound loading would have been material for creating explosives.
Peter Vincent on his web site (pjv101.net) has some history about the various versions of P van. Up until 1950, apparently, most loading went to Laverton for storage. He doesn't comment about what happened after 1950 but if the loads were detonators then the vans would have ended up anywhere that a track gang was based.
Speaking of dangerous loads LPG is decidedly worse. Loco crews were put through a one-day course on how to deal with LPG early in their career. So when a full LPG tank wagon in the SG yard began to leak one day, every loco in the depot was shut down, Dynon Rd was closed to traffic and emergency crews attended. Those crew members sitting in the depot meal room on standby (including me), knew that there would be little chance of survival if the thing did explode since it was at the near end of the yard. Obviously, it didn't go up since I am able to write about the event.
As far as CP vans were concerned, you're right about them being used on fast goods but with 40 of them and at least another 10 JCP (jointly V & SAR owned) they weren't always used on fast goods. If one was available it would have been put on any train that needed a van. The long defunct 'paper' trains (Melbourne newspapers departing Melbourne yard with the first edition of the morning paper for distribution along the main lines) commonly had at least one of these (or a ZLP) at the rear.
Keep the photos coming Shelton, they're bringing lots of memories back

Neil
  Shazam75 Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisbane
Wow - thanks Neil!  Fasinating to read about your roster and workings!  Thanks for sharing - yes I will try and find some more photos.

Regards
Shelton
  ngarner Assistant Commissioner

Location: Seville
Wow - thanks Neil!  Fasinating to read about your roster and workings!  Thanks for sharing - yes I will try and find some more photos.

Regards
Shelton
Shazam75
You made a comment about how pushing 4 wheelers could be a derailment risk. It was a possibility but in reality pushing a 4 wheeler was not that much different from a bogie. The axle weight, even empty, was enough to give them decent stability. What you had to watch out for was a spring popping out of its mounts or some other defect of the running gear. Then they became a real menace as this example will show.
I had a GY derail on me on an empty train of GYs out of North Geelong just as we approached Hoppers Crossing station. This was March 26 1981 with B80 doing the honours. We left Nth Geelong sometime after 7pm but I couldn't tell you exactly when but I do know that it was dark by the time we went through Werribee. The air in the brake pipe disappeared and we ground to a halt in full emergency. Being dark I couldn't see far behind the loco when I looked back so my driver grabbed the (only) hand lamp and set off back along the train to see what was wrong. I'm not sure what prompted it anymore but I must have looked back again a bit later and, the dust from the derailment having cleared, saw a GY drunkenly leaning across the east line (we were on the west one). To cap it off I then saw the halo of a headlight of an approaching down train shining over the crest of the climb on the Melbourne side of us. So I grabbed some detonators and the red flag (fat lot of good that was for me in the end) and set off as fast as I could to protect the east line. I can't tell you how far I got before the T class hauled Geelong bound pass appeared over the crest of the grade but it wasn't very far. Our headlight was still on, and on high beam, so the oncoming driver dipped his which meant I was now far less visible in the dark. I kept going towards the pass, until it was as close as I was prepared to risk myself, to clip some detonators onto the railhead. I kept going, waving the flag, but the loco assistant didn't see me, as by this stage the drivers view was blocked by the short end nose (flat top or high cab T, not a chop nose) and it was only the detonators going off that made the crew realise they were approaching a potentially dangerous situation and on went the brakes. The whole train went past me and finally stopped, short of the GY thankfully, and as I made my way back to B80 I passed the pass guard leaning out trying to work out why they'd stopped. He got the story from me and I returned to B80 where I recovered my nerves and breath. Didn't help that I was coming down with a cold at the time.
We were eventually relieved by another crew and returned to the depot, by taxi, where the manpower clerk, when he realised what train we were signing off from, had a go at us about not being able to get home by train anymore; like it was our fault! He obviously lived somewhere west of Hoppers Crossing.
I found out afterwards that one of the leaf springs (that David pointed out in the B siding photo you posted) had dislodged, dropped to the ballast and with only three points of support the GY collapsed onto the east line blocking it very effectively and, thankfully, breaking the air pipe connection, so our brakes went on, with the subsequent sequence of events.
The driver of the T class would have had a very nasty surprise if I hadn't been able to warn him in time.
I had other experiences with 4 wheelers, especially GYs, (probably because there were so many of them and in such high demand for moving grain) doing things they weren't supposed to but those tended not to be a running gear failure. I'll leave those stories for another time, when appropriate.

Neil
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

Y109 was still at Tottenham in 1985.

https://flic.kr/p/2hQ6KKX
  david harvey Chief Train Controller

Location: Upper Kumbuctor West
Wow - thanks Neil!  Fasinating to read about your roster and workings!  Thanks for sharing - yes I will try and find some more photos.

Regards
Shelton

We were eventually relieved by another crew and returned to the depot, by taxi, where the manpower clerk, when he realised what train we were signing off from, had a go at us about not being able to get home by train anymore; like it was our fault!  

Neil
ngarner
Yes Neil it was your fault in the eyes of a bureaucrat and  he was whining at the overtime the you got as well!!!

Its hard to top an action story like that Neil.  , not that I have one ,but
as I am reading your tale I had visions of the school teacher that went back along the line at
Glenrowan to flag down the police train, to prevent it from derailing as
the Ned Kelly Gang had removed a section of track .
The passengers on that pass would'nt known that Neil was just doing his job Rule 7 comes in to play here
  Shazam75 Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisbane
Thanks DuttonBay for the picture of the Pilot!  Looks like she is readying for the trip to Darling and Sons at Albion Smile

Thanks for sharing your stories with us Neil - always an interesting read.

Here is a signalling diagram from the 1970s, thanks to Mark Bau but it is only the Newport to Sunshine section - I am still trying to find the Sunshine to Albion section from the 1970s

https://www.victorianrailways.net/signaling/completedia/newsun79.html

Regards
Shelton
  david harvey Chief Train Controller

Location: Upper Kumbuctor West
- I am still trying to find the Sunshine to Albion section from the 1970s

https://www.victorianrailways.net/signaling/completedia/newsun79.html

Regards
Shelton
Shazam75
Hello Shelton
If you want a diagram from Sunshine to Albion it doesn't exist . OOOOOoooooooooo

The good news is the diagrams  went from  West Footscary to Sunshine including Tottenham  Yard  then the next section was  Albion to St Albans which to available on  the,

 look under https://www.victorianrailways.net  mark Bau's web site  Go to , Index, all the station names come up with photos then look for Albion

Simpleness or is it simplex Good luck
Dave
  Shazam75 Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisbane
Thanks Dave!  Good find!   - Neil was also looking for the 1970s diagram - which is here:

https://www.victorianrailways.net/signaling/completedia/albsab79dia.html

Regards
Shelton
  ngarner Assistant Commissioner

Location: Seville
Wow - thanks Neil!  Fasinating to read about your roster and workings!  Thanks for sharing - yes I will try and find some more photos.

Regards
Shelton

We were eventually relieved by another crew and returned to the depot, by taxi, where the manpower clerk, when he realised what train we were signing off from, had a go at us about not being able to get home by train anymore; like it was our fault!  

Neil
Yes Neil it was your fault in the eyes of a bureaucrat and  he was whining at the overtime the you got as well!!!
david harvey
Overtime; I wish Laughing
We signed on at 14:35 and off again at 22:50 for 8 hours 15 minutes. Short by comparison to one of the incidents I referred to earlier but haven't written about. That one meant 10 hours & 5 minutes and that was after being relieved at Kilmore East and riding in a taxi all the way back to Dynon.
A quick check shows my longest shift stretched to 12 hours 43 minutes. After a couple of shorter jobs we were sent off to take a pair of Y class (not including Y109) to try to help get T349 back on the rails after someone put it in the dirt.

Neil
  ngarner Assistant Commissioner

Location: Seville
Speaking of Y109 I thought I'd see where I'd come across the old girl, so here's where I came across her over a four year period (can't find my 1983 diary at the moment so that'll leave a gap). As mentioned early in this thread:

15/5/79 Tottenham Pilot to B siding Albion
17/5/79 Tottenham Pilot to B siding
18/5/79 Tottenham Pilot to B siding
19/5/79 Tottenham Pilot to B siding

I misread my notes earlier and we actually used Y108 on Tuesday 16th

19/8/80 at Sth Dynon being fuelled and stabled
3/1/81 Princes Bridge Pilot
22/4/81 Newport Pilot (Melbourne yard to Williamstown and various Newport sidings)
30/4/81 3rd unit on an up Seymour goods
17/6/81 LE to Tottenham (obviously to take up Pilot duties there again)

Not a lot of sightings over 4 years but probably not surprising if it spent a lot of time around Tottenham. There were probably more times when it was at Dynon but I tended not to record locos when working Fuel Point as you were on and off locos constantly, long enough to take them from the fuel point to one of the stabling roads or turntables. That meant you could move a lot of them in an 8 hour shift, especially when your driver used you as a second driver to cut down on the time it took, which was common after you'd been at the depot long enough to be known to be a competent assistant (though this didn't occur if officialdom asked but the smart foremen turned a blind eye if it made crews more efficient).

From the photos posted on his thread (with something of a date recorded), we can add

1/84 Tottenham yard
2/5/85 Tottenham yard
12/86 Tottenham yard

Neil

Edit
And with Duttonbays post after mine
2/8/77 Echuca
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

On 2/8/77 I photographed Y109 arriving at Echuca with the up goods from Balranald. So it did get out of Tottenham Smile
  Lockspike Deputy Commissioner

Overtime; I wish Laughing
We signed on at 14:35 and off again at 22:50 for 8 hours 15 minutes. Short by comparison to one of the incidents I referred to earlier but haven't written about. That one meant 10 hours & 5 minutes and that was after being relieved at Kilmore East and riding in a taxi all the way back to Dynon.
A quick check shows my longest shift stretched to 12 hours 43 minutes. After a couple of shorter jobs we were sent off to take a pair of Y class (not including Y109) to try to help get T349 back on the rails after someone put it in the dirt.

Neil
garner
I quickly learnt to carry emergency rations in my box, all the time, as once signed on you never knew how long it would be before getting home again. The longest was 32.5hrs; long before we had ever heard of fatigue management!
  Lockspike Deputy Commissioner

You made a comment about how pushing 4 wheelers could be a derailment risk. It was a possibility but in reality pushing a 4 wheeler was not that much different from a bogie.
ngarner
The problem with 4 wheelers was not so much pushing them, but reversing direction with them over a diamond crossing or slip, (and not a huge problem at that, as we used them for well over 100yrs). If the truck jerked sideways upon restarting in the opposite direction (normal occurrence), and if a wheel set had stopped over the unchecked theoretical points of the 'K' crossings in the middle of a diamond or slip (not as common), the sideways jerk could send that wheel set up the wrong road. With the other wheel set going up the desired path, once the truck had reached the limit of its very limited ability to twist, one or both wheel sets would derail.
A bogie is not subject to the same degree due to its shorter wheel base, (so I was taught, I never tested it myself).
Considering the number of times 4 wheelers were reversed over diamonds it was a relatively rare occurrence, but derailment investigators had/have to be aware of the possibility
  david harvey Chief Train Controller

Location: Upper Kumbuctor West

We were eventually relieved by another crew and returned to the depot, by taxi, where the manpower clerk, when he realised what train we were signing off from, had a go at us about not being able to get home by train anymore; like it was our fault!  

Neil
Yes Neil it was your fault in the eyes of a bureaucrat and  he was whining at the overtime the you got as well!!!
Overtime; I wish Laughing
We signed on at 14:35 and off again at 22:50 for 8 hours 15 minutes. Short by comparison to one of the incidents

Neil
ngarner

My heart felt apologies to you Neil .I will get the lads to have a whip around to cover the short fall


Not to under state what the potential accident that you avoided on the Geelong Line  Neil ,In my opinion every engineman would go through the training  for such a scenario but  the percentage of them who actually have to carry  out said scenario is slim but then have a train approaching  and for you too place  detonators on the track which exploded preventing  the train colliding  with derailment ,that’s a  pretty slim      percentage for it to  happen to anybody.


Here is some more excitement so sit back and have an Earl Grey and a Marie biscuit                                

I was working at Sunshine signal box one hot, windy February day, everything was running swimmingly.              Broadmeadows had belled a north east goods across on the Albion Loop line .Nothing to report on B siding for once.                 It was quite, until   a buzzer sounded and a shutter dropper down on the signal box switch board. Ringing was the phone from Post 92 which was the Up Home off the Albion Loop Line . Sitting at Post 92 was the up north east good which was the Shepparton M.T. petrol train which I had blocked to follow the next up St Albans suburban .I answered, “Sunshine Box” was my response , on the other end of the line was a very agitated engineman The conversation went something like this                    “It’s the fireman off the petrol train at Post 92 ,you got to move us now there’s a grass fire next to the track and it’s just about on to the line so ***ing get us out of here” As he was talking I have put back the signals on the main line to stop operated the points and signals. By the time the engine- man hung up the phone I could hear the T class powering away.                        Within 5 minutes the petrol train is at the up platform with a thumbs up from the crew as they grind to a holt at post 62 at the up platform.I have to tell suburban train control what I have done and they don’t see the funny side of thing, not saying this is funny. As this train is now blocking the up suburban line because it is wait to cross an other goods from Brooklyn . Its electric staff, single section,I Eventually the down goods appears electric staff are exchanged    petrol train ca n cross on to the Brooklyn line and the up St albans was 10 late , I just told train control ,rule 7 ,which is The safety of the travelling public is an employee’s first responsibility . Of course I get a blister (please explain)from safe working office but thats just part of train running   Now back to sleep in the parcels rack
  Shazam75 Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisbane
wow - really enjoyed that story Dave!  That's a ripper!  Never knew about the bell signal from Broadmeadows.  Also, the petrol train ex Shepp.  would that not have been an empty heading to Corio?  Still a risk for the crew next to a fire!
Also, interesting about the cross - waiting for a goods from Brooklyn to be crossed and the petrol train stopped on the up suburban!
You could have backed him into Siding B LOL.
Regards
Shelton
  ngarner Assistant Commissioner

Location: Seville


Here is some more excitement so sit back and have an Earl Grey and a Marie biscuit                                

I was working at Sunshine signal box one hot, windy February day, everything was running swimmingly.              Broadmeadows had belled a north east goods across on the Albion Loop line .Nothing to report on B siding for once.                 It was quite, until   a buzzer sounded and a shutter dropper down on the signal box switch board. Ringing was the phone from Post 92 which was the Up Home off the Albion Loop Line . Sitting at Post 92 was the up north east good which was the Shepparton M.T. petrol train which I had blocked to follow the next up St Albans suburban .I answered, “Sunshine Box” was my response , on the other end of the line was a very agitated engineman The conversation went something like this                    “It’s the fireman off the petrol train at Post 92 ,you got to move us now there’s a grass fire next to the track and it’s just about on to the line so ***ing get us out of here” As he was talking I have put back the signals on the main line to stop operated the points and signals. By the time the engine- man hung up the phone I could hear the T class powering away.                        Within 5 minutes the petrol train is at the up platform with a thumbs up from the crew as they grind to a holt at post 62 at the up platform.I have to tell suburban train control what I have done and they don’t see the funny side of thing, not saying this is funny. As this train is now blocking the up suburban line because it is wait to cross an other goods from Brooklyn . Its electric staff, single section,I Eventually the down goods appears electric staff are exchanged    petrol train ca n cross on to the Brooklyn line and the up St albans was 10 late , I just told train control ,rule 7 ,which is The safety of the travelling public is an employee’s first responsibility . Of course I get a blister (please explain)from safe working office but thats just part of train running   Now back to sleep in the parcels rack
david harvey
Okay, "when I was young, we lived in a hole in the middle of the road... " Laughing

Seriously, an empty oil train and a grass fire nearby! I'd have been worried too, as an empty petrol tank is more dangerous than a full one, full of explosive vapours.  I could say some crews would do anything to get their way but I don't think many would go that far.
Good to hear a stories from a different perspective.

I can think of twice when fire was an issue near me. Once, when the brakes of an up goods near Beveridge started a grass fire that took off to the east and we went the opposite direction some time after. The second was a request from emergency services for the fire attack train to, leave its siding in the sidings adjacent to North Melbourne shops and, assist with fighting a bushfire that had crossed the line near Wallan (11/1/82). T345 was used and it would have been really useful for the CFA until the pumps on the attack van failed to generate any real pressure when required. All that water and it was virtually useless.
In trying to find the details of this one I came across a third; December 17 1982, B63 was supposed to run a pass to Ballarat and return but started any number of lineside fires on the down trip so was sent to Ballarat loco as penance and we got T368 for the up trip (poor substitution; T for a B! At least it was largely downhill from Ballarat)

As for Lockspike's 32.5 hours on the job - no thanks! No wonder you took extra tucker, if that could happen. Sth Dynon manpower clerks did their best to get us off the road before we went too far past 10 hours; bless 'em. (Probably under threat from head office to save on money)

Neil
  Lockspike Deputy Commissioner

As for Lockspike's 32.5 hours on the job - no thanks! No wonder you took extra tucker, if that could happen. Sth Dynon manpower clerks did their best to get us off the road before we went too far past 10 hours; bless 'em. (Probably under threat from head office to save on money)

Neil
ngarner
Ok, so that occasion was statistically an outlier (not an out and out liar!).
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik

We were eventually relieved by another crew and returned to the depot, by taxi, where the manpower clerk, when he realised what train we were signing off from, had a go at us about not being able to get home by train anymore; like it was our fault!  

Neil
Yes Neil it was your fault in the eyes of a bureaucrat and  he was whining at the overtime the you got as well!!!
Overtime; I wish Laughing
We signed on at 14:35 and off again at 22:50 for 8 hours 15 minutes. Short by comparison to one of the incidents

Neil

My heart felt apologies to you Neil .I will get the lads to have a whip around to cover the short fall


Not to under state what the potential accident that you avoided on the Geelong Line  Neil ,In my opinion every engineman would go through the training  for such a scenario but  the percentage of them who actually have to carry  out said scenario is slim but then have a train approaching  and for you too place  detonators on the track which exploded preventing  the train colliding  with derailment ,that’s a  pretty slim      percentage for it to  happen to anybody.


Here is some more excitement so sit back and have an Earl Grey and a Marie biscuit                                

I was working at Sunshine signal box one hot, windy February day, everything was running swimmingly.              Broadmeadows had belled a north east goods across on the Albion Loop line .Nothing to report on B siding for once.                 It was quite, until   a buzzer sounded and a shutter dropper down on the signal box switch board. Ringing was the phone from Post 92 which was the Up Home off the Albion Loop Line . Sitting at Post 92 was the up north east good which was the Shepparton M.T. petrol train which I had blocked to follow the next up St Albans suburban .I answered, “Sunshine Box” was my response , on the other end of the line was a very agitated engineman The conversation went something like this                    “It’s the fireman off the petrol train at Post 92 ,you got to move us now there’s a grass fire next to the track and it’s just about on to the line so ***ing get us out of here” As he was talking I have put back the signals on the main line to stop operated the points and signals. By the time the engine- man hung up the phone I could hear the T class powering away.                        Within 5 minutes the petrol train is at the up platform with a thumbs up from the crew as they grind to a holt at post 62 at the up platform.I have to tell suburban train control what I have done and they don’t see the funny side of thing, not saying this is funny. As this train is now blocking the up suburban line because it is wait to cross an other goods from Brooklyn . Its electric staff, single section,I Eventually the down goods appears electric staff are exchanged    petrol train ca n cross on to the Brooklyn line and the up St albans was 10 late , I just told train control ,rule 7 ,which is The safety of the travelling public is an employee’s first responsibility . Of course I get a blister (please explain)from safe working office but thats just part of train running   Now back to sleep in the parcels rack
david harvey
'Now back to sleep in the parcels rack '.

Didn't you have a stretcher to put between the office stool and the signal box table? Smile
  david harvey Chief Train Controller

Location: Upper Kumbuctor West

'Now back to sleep in the parcels rack '.

Didn't you have a stretcher to put between the office stool and the signal box table? Smile
YM-Mundrabilla
No couldn't use them, the stretcher, the blanket  and the office stool were all in the pawn shop ,                                              

 so the next best place was the W-X-Y-Z parcel rack  because it was the longest
  ngarner Assistant Commissioner

Location: Seville
As for Lockspike's 32.5 hours on the job - no thanks! No wonder you took extra tucker, if that could happen. Sth Dynon manpower clerks did their best to get us off the road before we went too far past 10 hours; bless 'em. (Probably under threat from head office to save on money)

Neil
Ok, so that occasion was statistically an outlier (not an out and out liar!).
Lockspike
Most definitely. A number of 10 hour shifts over the years but 8 or a bit over was by far the average. Too long on the job and it screwed up the next shift as there was a mandated minimum between shifts. Don't recall exactly how long it was but at least once I couldn't do the shift the roster specified, for this reason.
As for sleeping on a stretcher, that would have been nice. Stretched out over 3 or 4 plastic chairs was the best crews on standby at Dynon generally got; that or the floor (and the loco floor was't unheard of on night shift pilots either).

Neil
  david harvey Chief Train Controller

Location: Upper Kumbuctor West
As for Lockspike's 32.5 hours on the job - no thanks! No wonder you took extra tucker, if that could happen. Sth Dynon manpower clerks did their best to get us off the road before we went too far past 10 hours; bless 'em. (Probably under threat from head office to save on money)

Neil
Most definitely. A number of 10 hour shifts over the years but 8 or a bit over was by far the average. Too long on the job and iIt screwed up the next shift as there was a mandated minimum between shifts.
ngarner

I can sympathise with Lockspike and, Neil and other who have done shift work and had to stay on.                                      I coped a few double shifts in my time a when your relief goes of sick and there is nobody to cover ,

,you  so its a 16 or 20 hour shift.    I found just sitting in the chair with your head on you arms                                              on the table the best way to get a few moments to recharge.  



If you really want to see Victorian Railways signalman sleeping in a parcels rack ,

U tube the Australian  Film ,Dimboola       its a bloody rippa the first 5 mins shows a vr pass hauled by a Y class                (it might be our friend Y109 or maybe its Lord Nelson) ) semaphores signals at Dimboola box, funny film


nothing to do with the cement siding at Albion Dave

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