Hobart ‘Rail’ Corridor - Hobart City Deal

 
  12CSVT Chief Commissioner

Location: Drowning in accreditation red tape!
Renewed focus on track quality and infrastructure is it about time Hobart to Launceston passenger services were reinstated ?

A DMU could do it.
freightgate
The only prospect for a Hobart - Launceston - Burnie rail passenger service is for a return of tourist & heritage trains, as was operated from 1984 to 2005. The South line is far too indirect for any feasible commercial transport service, even with modern tilting railcars.

The mandatory prerequisite for reviving commercial service would be the need to completely re-route the South Line between Brighton & Antill Ponds via the Jordan River Valley, achieving a far more direct route than the current aimless meanders via Campania, Colebrook, Rhyndaston , Parattah and York Plains.

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  derwentparkjunc Chief Train Controller

12CSVT - Re Mac Pt, I agree that the transit corridor allowed appears to be very light on for rail access needs. I suspect they are anticipating a busway option, or if light rail then no allowance for H&T.

Re ‘Option 2’ I agree that it has to be properly done from the start - I’m hopeful that various rail options are considered in the study but I’m concerned that only a ‘gold plated’ system will be compared with a busway and be shown not to be the ‘cost competitive’ system that is being touted in the general City Deal documentation.

See Sect 5, from page 19
https://www.infrastructure.gov.au/cities/city-deals/hobart/files/hobart-implementation-plan.pdf
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Australia's smallest state capital being plagued with big city traffic problems

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-04/public-transport-and-congestion-hobart-cars/11728076

I like the line, "build it and they will come, or maybe they won't"

Ferries deemed unlikely to be reliable enough and too high cost to start up, but I think this is a narrow view and rail is not a solution for the eastern shore due to its high cost.

The whole LR approach to the former railway is gold plating a simple lower solution and making the worst of both worlds, ie LR slow speeds and higher costs but using the out of the way HR corridor.

Simple solution is look at what works elsewhere, such as Westcoast Rail in Vancouver and Auckland. The feds will throw in money if they think it viable but will not fund 90% of the solution as the Qlder's have found out with CRR. Rail is also not going to be a simple solution for most of Hobart, just one corridor and at $80M/km LR beyond the existing corridor and perhaps an extension into the CBD is never going to be embraced by the limited budget of the Tas govt.

- Reopen line south of Austins Ferry, no need to incur costs of crossing the river for little return.

- Trains operate in peak, in peak direction only, north of Claremont, bus connection out of peak.

- Dual track up to TTMS and a passing loop between TTMS and Claremont for off-peak services. The corridor is wide enough to accommodate a 2nd track most of the way or where it cannot the bike track can be easily relocated.

- Extend line into under the city, ie Auckland Britomart style, tunnel yes, expensive yes, but required to make the service viable. The entrance to the tunnel would be before the Regatta area.

- Trains, start out with DMU only, option to convert to spark or hybrid later for example spark to Claremont only likely viable.

- Station next to ferry terminal at water front and reintroduce ferries to eastern shore. In 1974, they didn't have the traffic of today, people will use PT if it works for them in preference of traffic. Again ferries for some routes in peak only, buses during day across the bridge.
  12CSVT Chief Commissioner

Location: Drowning in accreditation red tape!
Australia's smallest state capital being plagued with big city traffic problems

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-04/public-transport-and-congestion-hobart-cars/11728076

I like the line, "build it and they will come, or maybe they won't"

Ferries deemed unlikely to be reliable enough and too high cost to start up, but I think this is a narrow view and rail is not a solution for the eastern shore due to its high cost.

The whole LR approach to the former railway is gold plating a simple lower solution and making the worst of both worlds, ie LR slow speeds and higher costs but using the out of the way HR corridor.

Simple solution is look at what works elsewhere, such as Westcoast Rail in Vancouver and Auckland. The feds will throw in money if they think it viable but will not fund 90% of the solution as the Qlder's have found out with CRR. Rail is also not going to be a simple solution for most of Hobart, just one corridor and at $80M/km LR beyond the existing corridor and perhaps an extension into the CBD is never going to be embraced by the limited budget of the Tas govt.

- Reopen line south of Austins Ferry, no need to incur costs of crossing the river for little return.

- Trains operate in peak, in peak direction only, north of Claremont, bus connection out of peak.

- Dual track up to TTMS and a passing loop between TTMS and Claremont for off-peak services. The corridor is wide enough to accommodate a 2nd track most of the way or where it cannot the bike track can be easily relocated.

- Extend line into under the city, ie Auckland Britomart style, tunnel yes, expensive yes, but required to make the service viable. The entrance to the tunnel would be before the Regatta area.

- Trains, start out with DMU only, option to convert to spark or hybrid later for example spark to Claremont only likely viable.

- Station next to ferry terminal at water front and reintroduce ferries to eastern shore. In 1974, they didn't have the traffic of today, people will use PT if it works for them in preference of traffic. Again ferries for some routes in peak only, buses during day across the bridge.
RTT_Rules
Ferries will fail unless the powers that be can shake off the "tourist sightseeing putt-putt" style ferry mind-set. If ferries are ever to be a viable means to travel they must be high speed Jet-cat ferries serving the distant water-side communities like Kingston / Blackmans Bay / Margate on the western shore and Tranmere / South Arm, etc. on the eastern shore. A "putt-putt" serving Bellerive is a total waste of time. The ferries must provide a faster commute than cars, and distance is needed to allow that.

We have a chronic situation with some influential Sen