The wait continues for report on Lydiard St rail gate smash

 
Topic moved from News by bevans on 28 Jul 2020 10:12
  NSWGR8022 Deputy Commissioner

Location: From the lands of Journalism and Free Speech
V/Line must be hiding information from te council on the cause of the accident or they are waiting for the investigation to complete by independent body or review.  Will the gates be restored i really hope so they are beautiful and deserve to be retained.

The wait continues for report on Lydiard St rail gate smash

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  justapassenger Minister for Railways

The answer is in the article - V/Line themselves don't yet have the results of the investigation.
  theanimal Chief Commissioner

If you look at the ATSB website, they list investigations, when they occurred, and when the final report is released..

Rarely quicker than 18 months.
  KRviator Moderator

Location: Up the front
V/Line must be hiding information from te council on the cause of the accident or they are waiting for the investigation to complete by independent body or review.  Will the gates be restored i really hope so they are beautiful and deserve to be retained.

The wait continues for report on Lydiard St rail gate smash
NSWGR8022
Fuggen'ell, they aren't asking for much are they?

It took the ATSB 8 weeks to get a preliminary report out about T842's hitup at Clevland in 2013 and around 11 months for the full report (fast by their usual standards) and it took them 23 months to publish the full report into the Waratah hitup at Richmond in 2018.

I would expect the preliminary report by this time next month and the full report by Christmas next year.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
The incident cause should not impact the timely fixing of the gates.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
V/Line must be hiding information from te council on the cause of the accident or they are waiting for the investigation to complete by independent body or review.  Will the gates be restored i really hope so they are beautiful and deserve to be retained.

The wait continues for report on Lydiard St rail gate smash
Fuggen'ell, they aren't asking for much are they?

It took the ATSB 8 weeks to get a preliminary report out about T842's hitup at Clevland in 2013 and around 11 months for the full report (fast by their usual standards) and it took them 23 months to publish the full report into the Waratah hitup at Richmond in 2018.

I would expect the preliminary report by this time next month and the full report by Christmas next year.
KRviator
In due course, in the fullness of time, when the time is right, when the necessary procedures have been completed ..................
Back in the days anything over a month for an accident report would have had the Commissioner banging heads together. That, of course, was in the real world outside the isolation, insularity and bureaucracy of Canberra.
Accident/incident investigation and reporting was a small part of most peoples jobs - now it is a career.
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
This is such a high profile issue and with no answers I haven't been able to sleep for the last 8 weeks.

If this is all you have to whinge and complain about then its some pretty friggin sad lives you lead Razz
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
My work colleague in Ballarat seems to think it is a big deal the crossing has been closed for 8 weeks and no details or dates on when it will be fixed.
  simstrain Chief Commissioner

My work colleague in Ballarat seems to think it is a big deal the crossing has been closed for 8 weeks and no details or dates on when it will be fixed.
bevans

Maybe the crossing will be permanently closed. Hence no need for the gates.
  route14 Chief Commissioner

Sounds like an easy way of level crossing removal.
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

Only 140m away from the nearest grade separated crossing of the line, and host to a quite dangerous layout with street and driveway junctions on all four corners of it, I reckon it should be a priority for closure.

It would be nice to include a nod to the prior heritage of the location by selecting a design for the fencing that evokes the old level crossing gates in its aesthetics while meeting modern standards for its function.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
My work colleague in Ballarat seems to think it is a big deal the crossing has been closed for 8 weeks and no details or dates on when it will be fixed.

Maybe the crossing will be permanently closed. Hence no need for the gates.
simstrain

That is one way to look at it i suppose however legitimately the council would like to know what the next steps are.
  Lad_Porter Chief Commissioner

Location: Yarra Glen
Unfortunately, there are no more trams.
  simstrain Chief Commissioner

Only 140m away from the nearest grade separated crossing of the line, and host to a quite dangerous layout with street and driveway junctions on all four corners of it, I reckon it should be a priority for closure.

It would be nice to include a nod to the prior heritage of the location by selecting a design for the fencing that evokes the old level crossing gates in its aesthetics while meeting modern standards for its function.
justapassenger

Close the crossing and put up fencing but rebuilding the gates as a mark to the past sounds like a good idea.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Only 140m away from the nearest grade separated crossing of the line, and host to a quite dangerous layout with street and driveway junctions on all four corners of it, I reckon it should be a priority for closure.

It would be nice to include a nod to the prior heritage of the location by selecting a design for the fencing that evokes the old level crossing gates in its aesthetics while meeting modern standards for its function.

Close the crossing and put up fencing but rebuilding the gates as a mark to the past sounds like a good idea.
simstrain
Rebuilding the gates will, for PTV/Vline/Victrack (whoever) in Victoria, be a task akin to the rebuilding of Notre Dame or Windsor Castle after their fires.

As the organiser of extravaganza railfan tours of old, the late Tom Murray, used to say 'They can't do it anymore'. To me there seem three likely outcomes:

  1. Nothing will be done - it's all too hard. If we procrastinate long enough the problem will go away.
  2. A half baked cheapskate 'plastic' patch-up job will be tried
  3. A proper restoration that will cost squillions is, perhaps, unlikely to be attempted


I have seen several cases where the traditional Oregon level crossing gates have been either damaged or totally destroyed. On each occasion the gates were professionally repaired or totally replaced within a few days. 'They can't do it anymore'!
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Only 140m away from the nearest grade separated crossing of the line, and host to a quite dangerous layout with street and driveway junctions on all four corners of it, I reckon it should be a priority for closure.

It would be nice to include a nod to the prior heritage of the location by selecting a design for the fencing that evokes the old level crossing gates in its aesthetics while meeting modern standards for its function.

Close the crossing and put up fencing but rebuilding the gates as a mark to the past sounds like a good idea.
Rebuilding the gates will, for PTV/Vline/Victrack (whoever) in Victoria, be a task akin to the rebuilding of Notre Dame or Windsor Castle after their fires.

As the organiser of extravaganza railfan tours of old, the late Tom Murray, used to say 'They can't do it anymore'. To me there seem three likely outcomes:

  1. Nothing will be done - it's all too hard. If we procrastinate long enough the problem will go away.
  2. A half baked cheapskate 'plastic' patch-up job will be tried
  3. A proper restoration that will cost squillions is, perhaps, unlikely to be attempted


I have seen several cases where the traditional Oregon level crossing gates have been either damaged or totally destroyed. On each occasion the gates were professionally repaired or totally replaced within a few days. 'They can't do it anymore'!
YM-Mundrabilla

I find this highly accurate and based on past performance.Smile
  hbedriver Chief Train Controller

The actual timber gates are the easy bit. The hard bit would be sourcing two of those big cast posts the gates were swinging from. Not that many around; many old ones broke as they were removed, and unlikely any were kept at spares, given that once installed they would normally last forever. None of their designers would have anticipated two being wrecked with a high speed impact. In this case, might be good reason it is hard.
  Lockspike Deputy Commissioner

I have seen several cases where the traditional Oregon level crossing gates have been either damaged or totally destroyed. On each occasion the gates were professionally repaired or totally replaced within a few days. 'They can't do it anymore'!
YM-Mundrabilla
Of course it can be done.
Is the lack of action emblematic of V/Line's modus operandi concerning maintenance?
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
I have seen several cases where the traditional Oregon level crossing gates have been either damaged or totally destroyed. On each occasion the gates were professionally repaired or totally replaced within a few days. 'They can't do it anymore'!
Of course it can be done.
Is the lack of action emblematic of V/Line's modus operandi concerning maintenance?
Lockspike
Top of their priority list - nothing else is more important Razz
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

The actual timber gates are the easy bit. The hard bit would be sourcing two of those big cast posts the gates were swinging from. Not that many around; many old ones broke as they were removed, and unlikely any were kept at spares, given that once installed they would normally last forever. None of their designers would have anticipated two being wrecked with a high speed impact. In this case, might be good reason it is hard.
hbedriver
I suggested above that the crossing be closed and the design of the old gates integrated into what would become fixed fencing at the site.

If this is adopted, it would be sufficient for the posts used to be substitutes that replicate the external appearance of the original posts while not having the same internal materials/construction. This is an accepted practice in the realm of heritage preservation.
  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

In the last iteration of the MBRP before its suspension, the Armstrong Street bridge (140 m west) was to be replaced. Although it did have two tracks under it at one time, apparently there would now be loading gauge issues with such under the current bridge.

https://www.premier.vic.gov.au/delivering-future-benefits-for-maryborough-passengers/


Might be a job for the LXRP.
  historian Deputy Commissioner

The actual timber gates are the easy bit. The hard bit would be sourcing two of those big cast posts the gates were swinging from. Not that many around; many old ones broke as they were removed, and unlikely any were kept at spares, given that once installed they would normally last forever. None of their designers would have anticipated two being wrecked with a high speed impact. In this case, might be good reason it is hard.
I suggested above that the crossing be closed and the design of the old gates integrated into what would become fixed fencing at the site.

If this is adopted, it would be sufficient for the posts used to be substitutes that replicate the external appearance of the original posts while not having the same internal materials/construction. This is an accepted practice in the realm of heritage preservation.
The posts are ornate steel/iron castings (probably cast iron) - they have an internal void which, as suggested, could become a solid if necessary. With advances in technology since the original design of these posts you may be able to get away with a steel pillar surrounded cosmetically with prestressed/reinforced concrete of some sort??????
historian
RP is doing stupid things again. The post above reading:

'The posts are ornate steel/iron castings (probably cast iron) - they have an internal void which, as suggested, could become a solid if necessary. With advances in technology since the original design of these posts you may be able to get away with a steel pillar surrounded cosmetically with prestressed/reinforced concrete of some sort??????

was mine.
It seems that RP is running multiple posts together under the one attribution.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
I think I may have said this previously, but historian's posts are invariably interesting and full of good information.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
I have seen several cases where the traditional Oregon level crossing gates have been either damaged or totally destroyed. On each occasion the gates were professionally repaired or totally replaced within a few days. 'They can't do it anymore'!
Of course it can be done.
Is the lack of action emblematic of V/Line's modus operandi concerning maintenance?
Lockspike
Time will tell Comrade. Smile
  historian Deputy Commissioner

The actual timber gates are the easy bit. The hard bit would be sourcing two of those big cast posts the gates were swinging from. Not that many around; many old ones broke as they were removed, and unlikely any were kept at spares, given that once installed they would normally last forever. None of their designers would have anticipated two being wrecked with a high speed impact. In this case, might be good reason it is hard.
I suggested above that the crossing be closed and the design of the old gates integrated into what would become fixed fencing at the site.

If this is adopted, it would be sufficient for the posts used to be substitutes that replicate the external appearance of the original posts while not having the same internal materials/construction. This is an accepted practice in the realm of heritage preservation.
The posts are ornate steel/iron castings (probably cast iron) - they have an internal void which, as suggested, could become a solid if necessary. With advances in technology since the original design of these posts you may be able to get away with a steel pillar surrounded cosmetically with prestressed/reinforced concrete of some sort??????
RP is doing stupid things again. The post above reading:

'The posts are ornate steel/iron castings (probably cast iron) - they have an internal void which, as suggested, could become a solid if necessary. With advances in technology since the original design of these posts you may be able to get away with a steel pillar surrounded cosmetically with prestressed/reinforced concrete of some sort??????

was mine.
It seems that RP is running multiple posts together under the one attribution.
historian

Indeed. I certainly didn't write either the post starting the 'The posts are ornate steel/iron castings', or the post noting the problem that Railpage was having.

My deathless prose seems to have vanished into the ether. Sic gloria and all that.

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