Save the Trees Community Rally and March October 20

 
Topic moved from News by bevans on 24 Jan 2020 14:03
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Seems they have lost at least some of the battle to save the older trees in the area.



There must be a better way than taking out hundreds of trees in the area to build a concrete rail bridge.

Save the Trees Community Rally and March October 20

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  williamvhale Beginner

It is a great initiative. “Each forest has its own definition of what is large and what is old,” Big, old trees have suffered the slings and arrows of climate, insects and diseases, and so they typically have a lot of features like cavities, which are really important from the standpoint of wildlife.” Big trees provide more space for sheltering animals as well as more food, for instance, and a large tree obviously holds onto more carbon than a smaller.
  Heihachi_73 Chief Commissioner

Location: Terminating at Ringwood
I hope they don't replace them with gum trees.
  Madjikthise Deputy Commissioner

Don't worry, it's balanced out by the trees they haven't bothered to cut back around the rest of the network that are keeping the sides of trains clean, and at times shorting out the overhead power.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Only a week until the line closes for some months.  Anstey will be the terminus of the line from Melbourne.  Was any consideration given to allowing services between the current end of line and somerton station given the closure length?
  Gman_86 Chief Commissioner

Location: Melton, where the sparks dare not roam!
The line is closed. I drove past Moreland station today and the overhead had already been removed.

The trees that caused so much consternation were unceremoniously chopped down weeks ago and the world has moved on. I dare say new trees will be planted beside the new Moreland station upon completion of this project.

As for running trains from Upfield to Somerton during the closure, I highly doubt that would have been considered at all. To do so would require significant work, including but not limited to the removal of substantial vegetation, the installation of overhead wires and the installation of a grade crossing at Somerton (Roxburgh Park) over the Standard Gauge track which would require ARTC approval, approval that would not likely be forthcoming.

As this closure will most likely be done (within the first part anyway) during wide-spread Covid19 restrictions, the bus option is just far too easy, especially with 2 nearby tram routes to alleviate some of the pressure.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Turnback to Mlebourne at Anstey

  trainbrain Chief Commissioner

poor TREEHUGGERS do you want some tisses?
  Crossover Train Controller

Location: St. Albans Victoria
poor TREEHUGGERS do you want some tisses?
trainbrain
I don`t think patronising comments  help .
Just as public transport is vital to the liveability of a big city so are trees .
It often seems the easy option is just to chop down what seems to be in the way rather than use some imagination .
It takes a very long time for young trees to grow to be able to enhance the environment as established trees do .
  kapow Junior Train Controller

I hope they don't replace them with gum trees.
Heihachi_73
Why?
  Heihachi_73 Chief Commissioner

Location: Terminating at Ringwood
They are the worst possible tree to be planted anywhere near civilisation. Gum trees near footpaths means gumnuts and leaves everywhere and slipping on your asre in the rain due to the eucalyptus oil (I avoid walking along the Costco side of Bond St Ringwood for that reason alone, not to mention the blind corner at Market St where it was completely beyond the Maroondah council's two brain cells to install a zebra crossing or at least a set of lights). Any car that routinely parks under one will also end up covered in the stuff. Not to mention the damage they cause to paths by ripping up concrete, as the roots move outwards rather than digging down, which can also provide a problem during strong winds and/or weak ground as the whole tree can tip over. And the fact they they can randomly lop their own branches during our naturally hot summers and provide practically no shelter from the sun or rain whatsoever.

Absolutely useless things unless you're a koala or magically still have a business making wooden railway sleepers this side of 1972.
  Adogs Chief Train Controller

They might try and pick species local to the immediate area.  

If it's like down here they'll largely plant more shrubby tree species like Banksia integrifolia and Banksia marginata.  If it's "gum trees" they might be E. sideroxylon (red ironbark), but I can't remember seeing too many larger tree species being amongst the ones they've planted out.  

There were red ironbarks around the Skye Rd crossing separation in Franga at least, but around Carrum it seen to be largely Banksias from my brief glance while driving past.
  Crossover Train Controller

Location: St. Albans Victoria
They are the worst possible tree to be planted anywhere near civilisation. Gum trees near footpaths means gumnuts and leaves everywhere and slipping on your asre in the rain due to the eucalyptus oil (I avoid walking along the Costco side of Bond St Ringwood for that reason alone, not to mention the blind corner at Market St where it was completely beyond the Maroondah council's two brain cells to install a zebra crossing or at least a set of lights). Any car that routinely parks under one will also end up covered in the stuff. Not to mention the damage they cause to paths by ripping up concrete, as the roots move outwards rather than digging down, which can also provide a problem during strong winds and/or weak ground as the whole tree can tip over. And the fact they they can randomly lop their own branches during our naturally hot summers and provide practically no shelter from the sun or rain whatsoever.

Absolutely useless things unless you're a koala or magically still have a business making wooden railway sleepers this side of 1972.
Heihachi_73
How very un Australian.Razz
  Crossover Train Controller

Location: St. Albans Victoria
They are the worst possible tree to be planted anywhere near civilisation. Gum trees near footpaths means gumnuts and leaves everywhere and slipping on your asre in the rain due to the eucalyptus oil (I avoid walking along the Costco side of Bond St Ringwood for that reason alone, not to mention the blind corner at Market St where it was completely beyond the Maroondah council's two brain cells to install a zebra crossing or at least a set of lights). Any car that routinely parks under one will also end up covered in the stuff. Not to mention the damage they cause to paths by ripping up concrete, as the roots move outwards rather than digging down, which can also provide a problem during strong winds and/or weak ground as the whole tree can tip over. And the fact they they can randomly lop their own branches during our naturally hot summers and provide practically no shelter from the sun or rain whatsoever.

Absolutely useless things unless you're a koala or magically still have a business making wooden railway sleepers this side of 1972.
How very un Australian.Razz
  Crossover Train Controller

Location: St. Albans Victoria
They are the worst possible tree to be planted anywhere near civilisation. Gum trees near footpaths means gumnuts and leaves everywhere and slipping on your asre in the rain due to the eucalyptus oil (I avoid walking along the Costco side of Bond St Ringwood for that reason alone, not to mention the blind corner at Market St where it was completely beyond the Maroondah council's two brain cells to install a zebra crossing or at least a set of lights). Any car that routinely parks under one will also end up covered in the stuff. Not to mention the damage they cause to paths by ripping up concrete, as the roots move outwards rather than digging down, which can also provide a problem during strong winds and/or weak ground as the whole tree can tip over. And the fact they they can randomly lop their own branches during our naturally hot summers and provide practically no shelter from the sun or rain whatsoever.

Absolutely useless things unless you're a koala or magically still have a business making wooden railway sleepers this side of 1972.
How very un Australian.Razz
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
They are the worst possible tree to be planted anywhere near civilisation. Gum trees near footpaths means gumnuts and leaves everywhere and slipping on your asre in the rain due to the eucalyptus oil (I avoid walking along the Costco side of Bond St Ringwood for that reason alone, not to mention the blind corner at Market St where it was completely beyond the Maroondah council's two brain cells to install a zebra crossing or at least a set of lights). Any car that routinely parks under one will also end up covered in the stuff. Not to mention the damage they cause to paths by ripping up concrete, as the roots move outwards rather than digging down, which can also provide a problem during strong winds and/or weak ground as the whole tree can tip over. And the fact they they can randomly lop their own branches during our naturally hot summers and provide practically no shelter from the sun or rain whatsoever.

Absolutely useless things unless you're a koala or magically still have a business making wooden railway sleepers this side of 1972.
Heihachi_73

Completely agree with this comment.
  HardSleeper Junior Train Controller

Location: Route 48
They are the worst possible tree to be planted anywhere near civilisation. Gum trees near footpaths means gumnuts and leaves everywhere and slipping on your asre in the rain due to the eucalyptus oil (I avoid walking along the Costco side of Bond St Ringwood for that reason alone, not to mention the blind corner at Market St where it was completely beyond the Maroondah council's two brain cells to install a zebra crossing or at least a set of lights). Any car that routinely parks under one will also end up covered in the stuff. Not to mention the damage they cause to paths by ripping up concrete, as the roots move outwards rather than digging down, which can also provide a problem during strong winds and/or weak ground as the whole tree can tip over. And the fact they they can randomly lop their own branches during our naturally hot summers and provide practically no shelter from the sun or rain whatsoever.

Absolutely useless things unless you're a koala or magically still have a business making wooden railway sleepers this side of 1972.
Heihachi_73
Spoken like a true proponent of The Australian Ugliness. Good to know 60 years on, some things never change.
  historian Deputy Commissioner

Absolutely useless things unless you're a koala or magically still have a business making wooden railway sleepers this side of 1972.
Heihachi_73

Or a native bird, which many people consider desirable to attract and retain.

Many of your issues are scarcely unique to eucalyptus trees and apply equally as well to non-native trees commonly found in urban environments. Seeds, berries, and sap causing trip hazards and messes. Horizontal roots causing the ground to lift. Branches randomly falling.

The only sure solution is to cut them all down. Concrete is much easier to clean. Keeps the city so much warmer, too, and no problems with pesky wildlife living in them.
  justarider Deputy Commissioner

Location: Mister Fact Checker
Absolutely useless things unless you're a koala or magically still have a business making wooden railway sleepers this side of 1972.

Or a native bird, which many people consider desirable to attract and retain.

Many of your issues are scarcely unique to eucalyptus trees and apply equally as well to non-native trees commonly found in urban environments. Seeds, berries, and sap causing trip hazards and messes. Horizontal roots causing the ground to lift. Branches randomly falling.

The only sure solution is to cut them all down. Concrete is much easier to clean. Keeps the city so much warmer, too, and no problems with pesky wildlife living in them.
historian
Mother Nature will always win in the end.

Even concrete is not immune. I have to scrub off the slippery moss every couple of years. It will eventually disintegrate, and the green wins.

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