Australian rail wagons list

 
  michael locos Beginner

Hi Everybody,

I have followed up this website for couples of months and I am doing some research regarding with Rail Wagons in Australia.
My research mainly aims to classify the total number of wagons operating currently in Australia and related technical indicators.

I have tried some websites, but there is only little useful info.

Could anyone help with some useful links or documents that I could find out more info.

Thanks a lot!

Michael

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  M636C Minister for Railways

Hi Everybody,

I have followed up this website for couples of months and I am doing some research regarding with Rail Wagons in Australia.
My research mainly aims to classify the total number of wagons operating currently in Australia and related technical indicators.

I have tried some websites, but there is only little useful info.

Could anyone help with some useful links or documents that I could find out more info.

Thanks a lot!

Michael
michael locos
Michael,

As somebody who has been collecting this sort of data for more than fifty years, I think I can say that there is no single list anywhere that will give you the data you seek.

It may be possible to get total numbers of wagons owned by operators from published annual statistics but the step of breaking it down into types and classes will be almost impossible.

There are lists showing what vehicles have been built, by whom and for whom but accounting for losses due to accidents and modifications to different types make a realistic listing very difficult.

The types of vehicles on the national system can be found on the ARTC website as part of the TOC manual, which is as good a list of vehicle types as you will find. Sadly there are no correspomding lists of numbers of wagons.

I recently published some data on Rio Tinto iron ore gondola wagons. What you do is drive to the Pilbara, photograph as many wagons as you can, then read the wagon numbers and in the case of Rio Tinto, their build dates and try to extrapolate from there. That also works for BHP Billiton but not for FMG, who don't have dates on wagons after the initial contract.

Roy Hill say they have 1196 iron ore wagons at the moment. What the actaul numbers are is less clear. I think they are generally numbered from 2001 but I have seen photos of a pair numbered 1001-1002 and a car numbered 3020.

I could provide some data in specific areas...

Hunter valley coal wagons are interesting. Aurizon number their wagons in a series with the NG wagons in Queensland, and Pacific National number their wagons in sets of between eight and four, such as 95011+95012+95013+95014 (with no wagons numbered between 95015 and 95020).

M636C
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

This is a huge project you're undertaking -

In 2013 Aurizon had 18,546 wagons consisting of 297 different classes and 829 locomotives consisting of 59 different classes - by 2018 Aurizon intends to reduce the size and complexity of its fleet to 185 wagon classes and 30 locomotive classes.

In 2014 there were 14,264 wagons and 597 locomotives in the Aurizon fleet.

In 2015 there were 13,960 wagons and 567 locomotives in the Aurizon fleet.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
As others have said an almost impossible task. I would go further and say impossible!

As a starting point I suggest that you differentiate between type and class as different people interpret these word differently.

At the end of the government railways (including National Rail) the definition can be summarised as:

Type = open, van, car carrier, coil wagon, container flat, flat flat (non container etc), coal hopper, grain hopper etc etc.

Class in each of the above groups = AOOX, ABFX, NMNY, VCSX, RQMX, NFLF, NHPH, NGGF etc etc

ARTC should have wagon by wagon list of vehicles that may run on their lines but that still does not cover the non-ARTC (NG for example) lines much less the Pilbara.

If you find your sanity and/or eyesight failing during this task (which is highly likely) GIVE UP. Smile
  michael locos Beginner

Thanks guys! I was frustrated during the past few days when I was working on it.
It seems like impossible task. But, is it weird that there is no official data regarding with total wagon number, technicial indicators, etc?
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
there are some AFGF coded wagons in North Dynon presently.  They are container flat wagons.  Is thre A the old Australian National Coding?
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Thanks guys! I was frustrated during the past few days when I was working on it.
It seems like impossible task. But, is it weird that there is no official data regarding with total wagon number, technicial indicators, etc?
michael locos
Not the way the show here operates.
'Commercial in confidence' covers/hides a lot of things. Bit like 'safety' which is the excuse for just about everything.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
there are some AFGF coded wagons in North Dynon presently.  They are container flat wagons.  Is thre A the old Australian National Coding?
bevans
Theoretically yes.
But it's a free for all these days.
  M636C Minister for Railways

there are some AFGF coded wagons in North Dynon presently.  They are container flat wagons.  Is thre A the old Australian National Coding?
Theoretically yes.
But it's a free for all these days.
YM-Mundrabilla
It would be unlikely for any standard container wagon to have a code "F" as the second letter.

This usually describes a flat car intended for traffic other than containers.

I have a vague feeling I've seen an AFGF but I can't recall what it might be.

As YM says, "A" is used by a number of operators.

Genesee and Wyoming are one user, who took over a number of "A" coded vehicles from The SA operations of AN.
Aurizon also use "A" for vehicles in Western Australia replacing the "W" on former WAGR vehicles.
Even SCT retain A prefixes on some vehicles, the ARBY and ARFY refrigerator vans being examples. The ARTC list these both under G&W and SCT, possily due to confusion from the "A" coding.

Can you give us some description of what they look like? What colour are they (if you can tell).

Aurizon use the AFAF code for small non standard containers of mineral concentrate from Kalgoorlie West to Perth. The same type of wagons (63' container) are (or were) also coded WQTY and AQCY in the same traffic.

M636C
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
I will try and get a photo in the next 24 hours.  The wagons could be AFAG actually Smile
  EFB5800 Chief Train Controller

Location: On my office roof.
http://wagonfreak.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/pota-bg-wagons.html?m=1

Wagonfreak's pics of the various AFGF container wagons that Pota was using on BG for a while.
  M636C Minister for Railways

http://wagonfreak.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/pota-bg-wagons.html?m=1

Wagonfreak's pics of the various AFGF container wagons that Pota was using on BG for a while.
EFB5800
Wow...

I think I'd seen the ones with two digit numbers before.

They appear to be operated by G&WA and seem to be ex SAR "O" wagons.
They may have an "F" code since they have complete decks.

The wagons with the 1600 series numbers are ex Commonwealth Railways narrow gauge wagons from the Central Australian Railway. The 1600 numbers are CR standard gauge numbers allocated after conversion to SG when the old CAR was replaced by the SG Tarcoola Alice Springs line. I assume they belong to G&WA now.

M636C
  M636C Minister for Railways

http://wagonfreak.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/pota-bg-wagons.html?m=1

Wagonfreak's pics of the various AFGF container wagons that Pota was using on BG for a while.
Wow...

I think I'd seen the ones with two digit numbers before.

They appear to be operated by G&WA and seem to be ex SAR "O" wagons.
They may have an "F" code since they have complete decks.

The wagons with the 1600 series numbers are ex Commonwealth Railways narrow gauge wagons from the Central Australian Railway. The 1600 numbers are CR standard gauge numbers allocated after conversion to SG when the old CAR was replaced by the SG Tarcoola Alice Springs line. I assume they belong to G&WA now.

M636C
  allan Chief Commissioner

I'll be even more specific and suggest that the O wagon derivatives are from the third build of O wagons (1952), so are all welded (unlike O wagons built in the 1920s) and retain their SAR numbers, between 1-100.
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
Thanks guys! I was frustrated during the past few days when I was working on it.
It seems like impossible task. But, is it weird that there is no official data regarding with total wagon number, technicial indicators, etc?
Not the way the show here operates.
'Commercial in confidence' covers/hides a lot of things. Bit like 'safety' which is the excuse for just about everything.
YM-Mundrabilla
Please list the total number of wagons in use elsewhere in the world. shouldn't take you more than 10 minutes seeing as how its' freely available and easily accesible.

It's only those nasty Aussies that won't give you the information.
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
The only way to do it is to get **all** the Rollingstock construction lists from Railway Digest (Thanks M636C and your mates Smile) and the earlier ones in ARHS Bulletin and Railway Transportation etc

As M636C noted earlier, you then cross match that list with losses due to crashes, modifications and retirements.

EDIT; the Sept 2016 Railway Digest now at my local newsagent has one of these regular rollingstock construction lists so check it to see the high level of detail available. These lists are simply wonderful for loco, carriage and wagon researchers SmileSmile
  emdrules Train Controller

Location: Port Augusta-Centre Of The Universe
Hi Everybody,

I have followed up this website for couples of months and I am doing some research regarding with Rail Wagons in Australia.
My research mainly aims to classify the total number of wagons operating currently in Australia and related technical indicators.

I have tried some websites, but there is only little useful info.

Could anyone help with some useful links or documents that I could find out more info.

Thanks a lot!

Michael
michael locos
Try searching for Australian National TIMS. This lists all of Australian National's fleet up to closure. You can click on a wagon number and it will give details of service, repairs and in some cases photos. Good luck.
  michael locos Beginner

Hi Everybody,

I have followed up this website for couples of months and I am doing some research regarding with Rail Wagons in Australia.
My research mainly aims to classify the total number of wagons operating currently in Australia and related technical indicators.

I have tried some websites, but there is only little useful info.

Could anyone help with some useful links or documents that I could find out more info.

Thanks a lot!

Michael
Try searching for Australian National TIMS. This lists all of Australian National's fleet up to closure. You can click on a wagon number and it will give details of service, repairs and in some cases photos. Good luck.
emdrules
Thanks Emdrules, I will start with TIMS to figure out my task.
  M636C Minister for Railways

The only way to do it is to get **all** the Rollingstock construction lists from Railway Digest (Thanks M636C and your mates Smile) and the earlier ones in ARHS Bulletin and Railway Transportation etc

As M636C noted earlier, you then cross match that list with losses due to crashes, modifications and retirements.

EDIT; the Sept 2016 Railway Digest now at my local newsagent has one of these regular rollingstock construction lists so check it to see the high level of detail available. These lists are simply wonderful for loco, carriage and wagon researchers SmileSmile
petan
Firstly, for anybody who hasn't checked it out:

TIMS; http://www.comrails.com/tims/$index.html

But critically that list runs out about twenty years ago....

The current issue has the Rio Tinto article that I described earlier.

It is worth noting that the Contracts and Deliveries article is Number 160.
So at four per year, that completes forty years of reporting every quarter.

John Beckhaus was involved with every one of those articles.

The next article might say something about the forty years...

The tabulation in "Railway Transportation" appeared monthly, but it didn't start in the October 1951 issue..
Say it ran from January 1952 to March 1973 or so, that was just over 20 years.

In those days, the government railways published lists of acquisitions, disposals and conversions.

These days you can get a glossy brochure from Bradken but they won't tell you how many vehicles they supplied because of commercial confidentiality. Sometimes the placing of a big order will be reported including a number of vehicles but apart from the passenger vehicles where the government wants you to know how much they are spending you won't be told.

I regularly check the running numbers of Hunter Valley coal wagons, particularly any new order. Standing on the bridge at Carrington and counting vehicles works well, if you can see both high and low numbers. Photographing builder's plates where fitted is good, too.

At least one recent order had a real Chinese plate on the first car and not the bland "CIMC Australia" name and the year which tells you nothing.

M636C
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
You may (or may not) find the recently release NTC report of some use in estimating overall totals.

There are a lot of howlers unfortunately - such as Rio having 11,500 wagons and BHPBIO having 248 Shocked

http://https://www.ntc.gov.au/about-ntc/news/media-releases/australia-s-freight-task-forecast-to-increase-by-26-per-cent-over-the-next-decade/
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
http://wagonfreak.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/pota-bg-wagons.html?m=1

Wagonfreak's pics of the various AFGF container wagons that Pota was using on BG for a while.
EFB5800

I think these could be it if the BG also sites along the fence on the southern side of North dynon.
  speedemon08 Mary

Location: I think by now you should have figured it out
http://wagonfreak.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/pota-bg-wagons.html?m=1

Wagonfreak's pics of the various AFGF container wagons that Pota was using on BG for a while.

I think these could be it if the BG also sites along the fence on the southern side of North dynon.
bevans
I assume the rest of the wagons along the fence are a medley of wagons that Qube have spare/on lease asides from the CQXY's and SQEF's
  M636C Minister for Railways

You may (or may not) find the recently release NTC report of some use in estimating overall totals.

There are a lot of howlers unfortunately - such as Rio having 11,500 wagons and BHPBIO having 248 Shocked

http://https://www.ntc.gov.au/about-ntc/news/media-releases/australia-s-freight-task-forecast-to-increase-by-26-per-cent-over-the-next-decade/
bingley hall
I couldn't get the link to work, but started at the web site and went from there.

Pretty bland stuff, compliled by people who don't understand the reality behind the numbers...

BHP Billiton's main line is around 426km long, but with the various branches and including the Yarrie line I'd expect it to have 800-1000 km of track.

Since BHPB use the old fashoined system of ore car numbering (an old car is replaced by a new car with the same number) there would be around 10248 iron ore wagons in use now. I have photos of wagons numbered 0081 and 10220 and many of the numbers in between.

M636C
  ChrisDPom Locomotive Fireman

Location: Bali, Europe, Perth (repeat)
BH. Just reading this post (4 years later Cool).
Actually there is a link for many countries wagons here (attached).
GCU for European wagons.

Doesn't have them all as some internals and some are not on the database because the owner hasn't paid their dues Smile.

But it does cover about 500,000 wagons:

https://www.gcubureau.org/wagons.


There is also a handy little number generator produced by a wagon enthusiast there to help get info in blocks:

http://wagons.1435mm.net/
  barryc Chief Train Controller

Location: Waiting for a train to Canungra
Nobody has mentioned one of the most common type of rail vehicle in Australia, namely the cane bin. There are thousands of them in use and many more are built to replace worn out ones every year.

I have never seen an order for them listed in Railway Digest despite the fact that I have seen them being churned out of almost backyard engineering shops in  the canefields.

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