3801 Boiler and it's return to operation

 
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Bevan, I had hoped you wouldn't be able to resist!

Thanks for the very good footage. A standout is the excellent firing of the loco - nice clear exhaust immediately over the funnel and no black smoke. . . looks good.

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  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
In addition to what Valvegear has said three other aspects appeal to me:
  • 'Bordering on reality' no unnecessary whistling, no unnecessary firing.
  • No open cylinder cocks blowing 'merely for added effect'.
  • No gunzels hanging from every carriage orifice.

Thanks for posting - most impressive
  FMAChet Station Staff

It is not my intention to create arguments, or to upset anyone, but apparently, 3801 is once again in need of repairs.

Is that true? If so, what is the reason behind those repairs? and how badly is said reason?
  DCook Chief Train Controller

Location: The standard state
It is not my intention to create arguments, or to upset anyone, but apparently, 3801 is once again in need of repairs.

Is that true? If so, what is the reason behind those repairs? and how badly is said reason?
"FMAChet"


What is your source for this?
  FMAChet Station Staff

It is not my intention to create arguments, or to upset anyone, but apparently, 3801 is once again in need of repairs.

Is that true? If so, what is the reason behind those repairs? and how badly is said reason?


What is your source for this?
DCook
At the risk of being laughed at or ridiculed, the NSWGR Steam Locomotive Group (Official) on facebook.

"3801 is having repairs done at the moment, and I thought that it had been all fixed. ------- Apparently not"

Some state that she like all locomotives is in need of repair from time to time, others say her boiler ticket expired.

I understand that the old topic of 3801 needing repairs again after just recently been overhauled is annoying at best, but the news got me surprised and concerned.
  LowndesJ515 #TeamRog

Location: Not in Victoria
Its nothing. No need to get all riled up everytime you 'hear' something happening to The 3801. Boiler tickets these days normally get issued on a 12 month basis. Over summer/into the new year the loco will get a new ticket allowing summer maintenance to get undertaken each year.

Its all routine maintenance, steam locos require maintenance all the time. It never ends. Items get pulled apart, checked then put back on.
  FMAChet Station Staff

Its nothing. No need to get all riled up everytime you 'hear' something happening to The 3801. Boiler tickets these days normally get issued on a 12 month basis. Over summer/into the new year the loco will get a new ticket allowing summer maintenance to get undertaken each year.

Its all routine maintenance, steam locos require maintenance all the time. It never ends. Items get pulled apart, checked then put back on.
LowndesJ515
I understand your query of 3801 needing to renew her boiler ticket, however, the person who posted that statement I quoted never stated the reason behind 3801's current repairs. His response was only this,

"It is a steam loco, they are always having repairs."

I've just sent him a message asking if he knows the purpose behind this. It's just that without any statement is to why repairs are going on, it frustrates me of being left in the dark.

I hope you understand what I'm trying to say.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
I've just sent him a message asking if he knows the purpose behind this. It's just that without any statement is to why repairs are going on, it frustrates me of being left in the dark.

I hope you understand what I'm trying to say.
FMAChet


LowndesJ515 has summed it up; it's routine maintenance.

Every year, the boiler cladding comes off followed by the dome cover, then the smokebox spark arrestor grids come out, washout plugs and mud gates are removed and so on; all so that the boiler inspector can do his job properly. That's just for the boiler.
Then maybe we'll take the Detroit Lubricator off and clean it out, then have a look at the injectors, perhaps then repack the turret valves.

What about a check of the turbo generator?  How are the auto couplers, hose bags, whistle, tender axle boxes,  and the other thousand and one items on the thing.It is not possible to list everything being done just for the benefit of the railfan fraternity. With the best will in the world, you need to understand that you, and other fans, are not entitled to be told everything as a matter of course. It just isn't feasible. The best way to find out is to become involved; I know that circumstances can prevent this, but it's worth saying nonetheless.

The purpose is to maintain good reliability, and best possible performance, and I've been there and done it. There's nothing new about it, so please quit worrying.
  hbedriver Chief Train Controller

I think I would be more concerned if they were NOT pulling it for maintenance at a quiet time.
  K160 Minister for Railways

Location: Bendigo
Read any heritage group newsletter and if they run steam they mention at least once a year about locos being withdrawn for inspection. As Valvegear and LowndesJ515 have mentioned it involves a strip-down mainly of the boiler to better assist the inspector doing their job. Any repairs noted are then carried out. Summer is typically when they are done as there is no steam on mainlines usually permitted in this period each year (based on what happens in Victoria at least).

Gossip just fuels speculations and there are enough of those already on various steam loco projects.
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
It is not my intention to create arguments, or to upset anyone, but apparently, 3801 is once again in need of repairs.
Is that true? If so, what is the reason behind those repairs? and how badly is said reason?
FMAChet
I note several good answers already so I'll answer your question another way. We presume your car goes into the overhaul workshop at certain very regular time periods as per the owners' manual. Lots of things are removed from your car and inspected, so your car is just a basic body shell with some engine and wheel bits etc etc spread around on work benches. Failure to do that might void your car's warranty and failure to check certain parts might void your car registration, especially if you live in a state that requires annual roadworthy certificates. Exactly the same with a steam locomotive, except add in the complexity that it has a large pressure vessel (boiler) that needs to pass a very detailed safety check by a boiler inspector who thankfully is more enthusiastic than some car mechanics I have met.  In other words. 3801 must have scheduled routine maintenance, same as your car, truck, bus or whatever, if it wants to keep it track and boiler certificate. The track certificate or what ever it is termed, would relate to things like brakes and wheel tread etc etc, bit like the wheel tread depth and brake pad wear of my car, is checked.

Edit. Most cars have modern technology but 3801 was delivered in 1943 so add in the fact that era steam technology has extra inspection and repair needs which the staff manage in their usual professional manner
  safeworking Station Master

Location: Bungendore
Actually, providing details of what repairs and rebuilds are happening with the various pieces of operational rolling stock is actually good publicity, whether on websites or Facebook.  A good example of this is the Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Railway blog pages for UK railways and Facebook pages for a number of US groups rebuilding everything from ancient narrow gauge locos to full-size 4-8-4s built to the maximum US loading gauge.  Photos are given with quite detailed explanations on what is happening and why is required, giving quite an education on the intricacies of steam loco repair and operation.  There are then some discussions with very knowledgeable readers on, say, the pros and cons of using one or other of the various welding techniques. The reader has the option of following the discussion or ignoring it.  What is clear is the respect shown to even the most inane question by these professional artisans, and their care in providing clear simple answers.  Also clear is the respect and assistance given between the various groups battling decades-old technology; something sometimes lacking on these Railpage threads.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Actually, providing details of what repairs and rebuilds are happening with the various pieces of operational rolling stock is actually good publicity, whether on websites or Facebook.
safeworking
Good publicity for whom? What audience are you aiming at? I don't think the general public could give two hoots (unfortunately). All they want to know is where the special trains are going and when.
Most of the groups keep their members up to date in return for their membership fees and/or volunteer work which I think is fair. If you want know these details, join up. Better still, volunteer to help produce such news items. Then you can also have some input as to where they are printed and distributed.
  safeworking Station Master

Location: Bungendore
The two audiences we are aiming for are those in the general community having useful skills and time to devote to volunteer purposes, and, young people who are attracted to something that today is out of left field and who may replace us whom time is catching up on. To reach these we must go beyond the current rail fan community. Of the three qualifications that you listed in your last three sentences, I have done all three.

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