Queensland Diesel Locomotives Quiz

 
  Spletsie Chief Commissioner

Test your knowledge of Queensland diesel locomotives with this 20-question multiple choice quiz:
https://www.railtram.com.au/qld-diesel-locomotives

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  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Another great quiz, spletsie, but all it proved is that I know next to nothing about the subject. I made four lucky guesses.Embarassed
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Test your knowledge of Queensland diesel locomotives with this 20-question multiple choice quiz:
https://www.railtram.com.au/qld-diesel-locomotives
Spletsie
Sorry but need to change answers as the diesels bearing Clyde plates up the 1980s, apart from what became the 1400 and 1450 class, were actually assembled by Commonwealth Engineering (QLD), Comeng, as subcontractors to Clyde. The Clyde workshop was at Eagle Farm on the northside of the river near the old Eagle Farm international airport. Comeng was located within the Rocklea Industrial Estate, over on the south side of the river, with that area later becoming Salisbury as the Rocklea East Post Office in Evans Rd near the Salisbury tram terminus was renamed Salisbury North 1 January 1966. PO name change dates from the Salisbury History book (Feb 2000) and I have a copy as I grew up in the Rocklea Salisbury Moorooka Acacia Ridge area in that era. Clyde plated diesels were driven from Comeng Salisbury and entered through Rocklea station.

More https://qrig.org/motive-power/locomotives/diesel/qrnational/clydegm-1460-class

The Clyde 1400 and 1450 class were built by Clyde in Sydney.

The International GE (USA) built diesels entered service bearing numbers 1210 onwards and the last three were later built by Goninan Newcastle Australia, although 1213, as you note, was first in service. Yes, initial service was Toowoomba region grain, then coastal mail trains.
My data for QR diesels, including the Comeng -Clyde link,  from  John Armstrong's Locomotives in the Tropics V3  https://railshop.com.au/locomotives-in-the-tropics-3-john-armstrong-book

More on the Comeng Rocklea, later renamed Salisbury, assembly of Cylde diesels, is in Dunn's Comeng history books.

More  https://qrig.org/motive-power/locomotives/diesel/qrnational/goninanige-1150-class
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Got 50%. Due almost entirely to lucky guesses as few things interest me less than Queensland locomotives and their, to me anyway, incoherent classification system. Smile

Thanks Spletsie. Ignore my iggerance of the topic - even cheating wouldn't help. Good for a laugh though. Rolling Eyes
  Spletsie Chief Commissioner

Test your knowledge of Queensland diesel locomotives with this 20-question multiple choice quiz:
https://www.railtram.com.au/qld-diesel-locomotives
Sorry but need to change answers as the diesels bearing Clyde plates up the 1980s, apart from what became the 1400 and 1450 class, were actually assembled by Commonwealth Engineering (QLD), Comeng, as subcontractors to Clyde. The Clyde workshop was at Eagle Farm on the northside of the river near the old Eagle Farm international airport. Comeng was located within the Rocklea Industrial Estate, over on the south side of the river, with that area later becoming Salisbury as the Rocklea East Post Office in Evans Rd near the Salisbury tram terminus was renamed Salisbury North 1 January 1966. PO name change dates from the Salisbury History book (Feb 2000) and I have a copy as I grew up in the Rocklea Salisbury Moorooka Acacia Ridge area in that era. Clyde plated diesels were driven from Comeng Salisbury and entered through Rocklea station.

More https://qrig.org/motive-power/locomotives/diesel/qrnational/clydegm-1460-class

The Clyde 1400 and 1450 class were built by Clyde in Sydney.

The International GE (USA) built diesels entered service bearing numbers 1210 onwards and the last three were later built by Goninan Newcastle Australia, although 1213, as you note, was first in service. Yes, initial service was Toowoomba region grain, then coastal mail trains.
My data for QR diesels, including the Comeng -Clyde link,  from  John Armstrong's Locomotives in the Tropics V3  https://railshop.com.au/locomotives-in-the-tropics-3-john-armstrong-book

More on the Comeng Rocklea, later renamed Salisbury, assembly of Cylde diesels, is in Dunn's Comeng history books.

More  https://qrig.org/motive-power/locomotives/diesel/qrnational/goninanige-1150-class
petan
Thanks petan. I wasn't aware of the subcontracting arrangements from Clyde to Comeng and assembly at their plant. Question 4 has been amended so that it does not conflict with this information. Question 5 has been broadened and some different responses provided, again so that it does not conflict with the information you have provided.
A quick scan of Locomotives in the Tropics, vol. 3, can lead to error as pages 170 and 173 list the 1550 and 2150 Classes as being built by Clyde Engineering at Eagle Farm without reference to subcontracting, although there is reference to this arrangement elsewhere in the book.
  Graham4405 Minister for Railways

Location: Dalby Qld
Perhaps unsurprisingly I managed 85%, but I have no excuses for not getting 100%!
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
Test your knowledge of Queensland diesel locomotives with this 20-question multiple choice quiz:
https://www.railtram.com.au/qld-diesel-locomotives
Sorry but need to change answers as the diesels bearing Clyde plates up the 1980s, apart from what became the 1400 and 1450 class, were actually assembled by Commonwealth Engineering (QLD), Comeng, as subcontractors to Clyde. The Clyde workshop was at Eagle Farm on the northside of the river near the old Eagle Farm international airport. Comeng was located within the Rocklea Industrial Estate, over on the south side of the river, with that area later becoming Salisbury as the Rocklea East Post Office in Evans Rd near the Salisbury tram terminus was renamed Salisbury North 1 January 1966. PO name change dates from the Salisbury History book (Feb 2000) and I have a copy as I grew up in the Rocklea Salisbury Moorooka Acacia Ridge area in that era. Clyde plated diesels were driven from Comeng Salisbury and entered through Rocklea station.

More https://qrig.org/motive-power/locomotives/diesel/qrnational/clydegm-1460-class

The Clyde 1400 and 1450 class were built by Clyde in Sydney.

The International GE (USA) built diesels entered service bearing numbers 1210 onwards and the last three were later built by Goninan Newcastle Australia, although 1213, as you note, was first in service. Yes, initial service was Toowoomba region grain, then coastal mail trains.
My data for QR diesels, including the Comeng -Clyde link,  from  John Armstrong's Locomotives in the Tropics V3  https://railshop.com.au/locomotives-in-the-tropics-3-john-armstrong-book

More on the Comeng Rocklea, later renamed Salisbury, assembly of Cylde diesels, is in Dunn's Comeng history books.

More  https://qrig.org/motive-power/locomotives/diesel/qrnational/goninanige-1150-class
Thanks petan. I wasn't aware of the subcontracting arrangements from Clyde to Comeng and assembly at their plant. Question 4 has been amended so that it does not conflict with this information. Question 5 has been broadened and some different responses provided, again so that it does not conflict with the information you have provided.
A quick scan of Locomotives in the Tropics, vol. 3, can lead to error as pages 170 and 173 list the 1550 and 2150 Classes as being built by Clyde Engineering at Eagle Farm without reference to subcontracting, although there is reference to this arrangement elsewhere in the book.
Spletsie

David, I found the book references for you. Comeng's contract from Clyde to build the QR 1550 and 2150 Classes at Comeng's Salisbury Brisbane plant is shown in John Dunn's Comeng books. The 1550 class is volume 3 page 313 and the 2150 class is Volume 4 page 138.

Comeng's arrangement for them to build Clyde locos at Comeng's Salisbury Brisbane plant is mentioned in Locomotives in the Tropics, vol. 3 on Page 57, left column, middle paragraph. That is the 1700 class discussion as that was the first Clyde QR class that Comeng built at their Salisbury plant. (EDIT) The 1700 class was first Clyde QR diesel electric loco class built in QLD and the previous diesels (1400 and 1450 series) built Sydney.

As many know, it was all about tender price as the QLD state government permitted a price allowance for local manufacture. The problem was Clyde's big QR loco competitor was English Electric who had already taken advantage of the 'Buy QLD Made' price allowance and established their Australian plant at Rocklea next door to Comeng. That forced Clyde to do similar and seek a QLD plant which resulted in their deal with Comeng. Obviously Clyde considered it was more efficient to outsource the locomotive assembly to Comeng, rather than expand their own Eagle Farm plant. It is known some Comeng built locomotives later visited Clyde's Eagle Farm plant for various reasons.

David, I did your revised quiz and thought it was interesting Smile
Cheers Peter Cokley
  M636C Minister for Railways

I only scored a disappointing 90%

One error was not reading the question about the first main line locomotive....

I correctly answered the question about the DL class. However, these were not ordered as shunting locomotives, although they did later operate as shunters. They were ordered and initially used as branch line power on the Forsayth line, and could operate with all four units under multiple control. DL1 was built as a more or less standard Drewry 0-6-0 but had a leading axle added to reduce track forces in curves. By the time I joined QR they were no longer working the Forsayth line.

Peter
  Lockspike Deputy Commissioner

60%; I'm surprised I did that well. QLD diesel classes have remained a point of confusion to me.
Thanks Spletsie.
  Spletsie Chief Commissioner

Test your knowledge of Queensland diesel locomotives with this 20-question multiple choice quiz:
https://www.railtram.com.au/qld-diesel-locomotives
Sorry but need to change answers as the diesels bearing Clyde plates up the 1980s, apart from what became the 1400 and 1450 class, were actually assembled by Commonwealth Engineering (QLD), Comeng, as subcontractors to Clyde. The Clyde workshop was at Eagle Farm on the northside of the river near the old Eagle Farm international airport. Comeng was located within the Rocklea Industrial Estate, over on the south side of the river, with that area later becoming Salisbury as the Rocklea East Post Office in Evans Rd near the Salisbury tram terminus was renamed Salisbury North 1 January 1966. PO name change dates from the Salisbury History book (Feb 2000) and I have a copy as I grew up in the Rocklea Salisbury Moorooka Acacia Ridge area in that era. Clyde plated diesels were driven from Comeng Salisbury and entered through Rocklea station.

More https://qrig.org/motive-power/locomotives/diesel/qrnational/clydegm-1460-class

The Clyde 1400 and 1450 class were built by Clyde in Sydney.

The International GE (USA) built diesels entered service bearing numbers 1210 onwards and the last three were later built by Goninan Newcastle Australia, although 1213, as you note, was first in service. Yes, initial service was Toowoomba region grain, then coastal mail trains.
My data for QR diesels, including the Comeng -Clyde link,  from  John Armstrong's Locomotives in the Tropics V3  https://railshop.com.au/locomotives-in-the-tropics-3-john-armstrong-book

More on the Comeng Rocklea, later renamed Salisbury, assembly of Cylde diesels, is in Dunn's Comeng history books.

More  https://qrig.org/motive-power/locomotives/diesel/qrnational/goninanige-1150-class
Thanks petan. I wasn't aware of the subcontracting arrangements from Clyde to Comeng and assembly at their plant. Question 4 has been amended so that it does not conflict with this information. Question 5 has been broadened and some different responses provided, again so that it does not conflict with the information you have provided.
A quick scan of Locomotives in the Tropics, vol. 3, can lead to error as pages 170 and 173 list the 1550 and 2150 Classes as being built by Clyde Engineering at Eagle Farm without reference to subcontracting, although there is reference to this arrangement elsewhere in the book.

David, I found the book references for you. Comeng's contract from Clyde to build the QR 1550 and 2150 Classes at Comeng's Salisbury Brisbane plant is shown in John Dunn's Comeng books. The 1550 class is volume 3 page 313 and the 2150 class is Volume 4 page 138.

Comeng's arrangement for them to build Clyde locos at Comeng's Salisbury Brisbane plant is mentioned in Locomotives in the Tropics, vol. 3 on Page 57, left column, middle paragraph. That is the 1700 class discussion as that was the first Clyde QR class that Comeng built at their Salisbury plant. (EDIT) The 1700 class was first Clyde QR diesel electric loco class built in QLD and the previous diesels (1400 and 1450 series) built Sydney.

As many know, it was all about tender price as the QLD state government permitted a price allowance for local manufacture. The problem was Clyde's big QR loco competitor was English Electric who had already taken advantage of the 'Buy QLD Made' price allowance and established their Australian plant at Rocklea next door to Comeng. That forced Clyde to do similar and seek a QLD plant which resulted in their deal with Comeng. Obviously Clyde considered it was more efficient to outsource the locomotive assembly to Comeng, rather than expand their own Eagle Farm plant. It is known some Comeng built locomotives later visited Clyde's Eagle Farm plant for various reasons.

David, I did your revised quiz and thought it was interesting Smile
Cheers Peter Cokley
petan
Thanks Peter for the references and additional information. I'm glad you found the quiz interesting.
  Spletsie Chief Commissioner

I only scored a disappointing 90%

One error was not reading the question about the first main line locomotive....

I correctly answered the question about the DL class. However, these were not ordered as shunting locomotives, although they did later operate as shunters. They were ordered and initially used as branch line power on the Forsayth line, and could operate with all four units under multiple control. DL1 was built as a more or less standard Drewry 0-6-0 but had a leading axle added to reduce track forces in curves. By the time I joined QR they were no longer working the Forsayth line.

Peter
M636C
Thanks MC636C.

Question 1 has been slightly re-worded so that it covers both their shunting and branch line usage.

90% is a great score, but you have often scored 100%, a result not achieved by many.
  Big J Deputy Commissioner

Location: In Paradise
Thankyou for another great quiz. Achieved 90%. Reading the thread afterwards showed that I benefited from some tweaks.

Failed on the numbers in the early days.
  GeoffreyHansen Minister for Railways

Location: In a FAM sleeper
Keep up your good work with your quizzes Spletsie!

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