Auckland Electrification Thread

 
Topic moved from NZ and Oceania by bevans on 05 Feb 2015 19:39
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Last week saw the completion of the last

formal pre-livening inspection walk-outs



over Auckland’s new electrified network.



The last 24 kilometres between

Newmarket and Swanson were covered



over five days and brought the long



process to a conclusion. The complete

network from Papakura in the south to

Swanson in the west has been covered.

“This was a milestone for the project,”

says Traction and Electrical Manager,

Allan Neilson. “At the end of the trail,

the inspection teams and all the other

contractor and project personnel, who

made sure that the installation detail was



correct before my official walkouts, must



have walked a collective total of many

hundreds of kilometres.”

The last pre-livening inspection

walk-out was undertaken by a joint

team comprising KiwiRail staff and

representatives from AECOM who

designed the overhead systems for the



Auckland Electrification Project.



“We checked that everything was sound



and electrically safe and flagged any



issues that needed to be attended to

before energisation. It’s been a long walk

to freedom, so to speak, but it’s fantastic

to have the whole massive project

nearing completion,” says Allan.

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  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Auckland

network

fully

energised




With the declaration of permanent

energisation of the traction overhead

system from Newmarket to Swanson at



2230 hours on Monday 8 September,



the energisation of the entire Auckland

network has become a reality.

Although the Papakura Station east side

will not be turned on until after Christmas

and line testing, resolution of a number

of technical problems and completion of

minor remedial works will continue over



the next few months, the entire network



is now deemed live for electrical safety

reasons.

“This is a milestone achievement that is

drawing the AEP project to a conclusion.



This week’s Energisation Notice will be



the last I have to post for the project

as the Manager Traction & Electrical



Engineering,” says Allan Neilson. “It’s



a strange but very satisfying feeling

because the project has been such an

important part of our work for seven years



now. There’s also a feeling of enormous



pride in what we have achieved.”



Express plans to run a special feature on




the completion of AEP later in the year.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
The new CAF emu's are expected to take over all rush hour services on the Eastern/Manakau line as of the 15th of September. This also means that Friday 12th of September will probably be the last time that the ADK's are used in normal service. I understand the SX set has not been used for several weeks now.

Once the Manakua services have settled down then the CAF emu's should start to filter onto the Southern services to Papakura. Evening or weekend services first is not clear at this stage.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
3. Rail Electrification
Mid-2013: Depot
• Apr 2014: Onehunga Line services
• Sep 2014: Manukau via Eastern Line services
• Mar 2015: Southern Line services
• Jul 2015: Western Line services

Provisional acceptance of 20 Units was achieved in August. AT introduced 11 Units into revenue service during August.
• During late July, issues were experienced with the overhead line power supply on the Onehunga Line. A decision was made to remove the EMUs from service until further testing could be undertaken for service delivery and customer experience reasons. EMUs were returned to service on the Onehunga Line in early August to enable further in-service testing and to progressively test units out of service on both the Onehunga and Manukau via Eastern Line.
• From early August, optimisation of the European Train Control System (ETCS, the train/signalling safety management system) application was implemented on the EMUs on the Onehunga Line improving run-time performance through improvements to train stopping distance (speed curve) applications.
• From early September, Manukau via Eastern Line off peak and inter-peak existing timetabled diesel services were progressively replaced with EMUs. This permitted the resolution of any run-time issues prior to the introduction of peak EMU services. The EMU off-peak and inter-peak services have operated exceptionally well in terms of punctuality and from 15th September, full EMU replacement of existing Manukau via Eastern Line diesel timetable services is planned.
• The joint Timetable Committee comprising Auckland Transport, KiwiRail and Transdev approved the next rail new timetable for implementation in early December. The new timetable will provide for full 7-day EMU Manukau via Eastern Line services with increased frequency to 6 trains per hour peak, and 3 trains per hour in the interpeak and off-peak, with weekends at 2 trains per hour. Diesel shuttle services will run an hourly service between Pukekohe and Papakura on Saturdays and Sundays and connect with arriving/departing EMUs at Papakura. Papakura / Pukekohe diesel services will all operate via the Southern Line (via Newmarket) rather than operating an alternating via Southern Line and via Eastern Line. This will improve the customer legibility of the Eastern Line (Manukau) and Southern Line (Papakura / Pukekohe) service patterns and improve resilience and robustness of the timetable.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
At 11:00 pm on Monday 29 September,



the first EMU ran on the North Auckland

Line from Newmarket to Swanson — an



historic milestone marking the effective



completion of the AEP project.



“The successful run to Swanson means that

electric units have now travelled on the entire

electrified network,” says Allan Neilson, Manager

Traction and Electrical Engineering. “There will

still be some residual tidy-up work and testing

to be completed. Everything on the network is

operating safely and the infrastructure job is

now essentially done.”

The completion of the Auckland Electrification

Project (AEP) is the culmination of more than

seven years of intensive work and over a billion

dollars in government investment spanning two

major projects — DART (Developing Auckland’s

Rail Transport) and the electrification of the

Auckland metro network.

“These are two of the biggest and most

important rail infrastructure projects

undertaken in New Zealand for decades.

They have consumed around two million

hours of work and presented significant

engineering challenges. Drawing these

massive programmes to a successful

conclusion is a huge achievement,” says

AEP Project Director, Nicholas French.

The AEP has involved the installation of

3,500 foundations and masts, carrying

560 km of overhead lines across 175 km

of track and accounted for a total of over a

million hours worked.

“Throughout the electrification project, we

had some minor environmental issues, zero

medical-time injuries and just three minor

loss-of-time injuries. That’s an amazing

achievement for a project of this scale.

It’s a credit to all involved in the project —

from the crews working night shifts to string

lines to the project teams planning work

schedules,” says Nicholas.

The safety record of our staff and crews

also forms a part of a wider safety initiative

as the introduction of faster, quieter electric

trains brings with it new safety hazards and

risks for the public.



“To address these needs the deployment



of physical safety measures around

overhead wires has followed international

best practice guidelines and we’ve taken

a region-wide, multi-agency approach



to getting the safety message across to



the public. We’re working with Auckland

Transport, the New Zealand Transport



Agency and Transdev in delivering



messages to the public about always being

vigilant, attentive and responsible around

the new electric infrastructure and trains,”

says Nicholas.

Significant innovations and the use of



advanced technology also formed an



important part of the electrification project.

These included the design and build of

a new SCADA control system and an

upgrade of the Traction Control Centre in

Wellington.

The electrification project also triggered

complete re-signalling of the Auckland

metro network. “A key component of this

was the more effective technical integration

of the signal and traction systems,” says

Allan Neilson. “These innovations were

notable when compared to standard

international practice.”

The new signalling allows bi-directional

operation and Automatic Route Setting.



This enables train control to better manage



train movements around the electrified

network and minimise delays to services.

An automatic train protection system has
















been introduced that has the capacity to



override drivers if they are travelling too



fast towards red lights or exceeding speed

limits.

“There has been significant focus on

deploying technology that will enable greater

levels of automation, communications and

safety across the entire network,” says

Allan, “and that’s a very significant step

forward.”

The completion of AEP moves Auckland

closer to its goal of getting more commuters

out of their cars and into trains as it strives

to become one of the world’s most liveable

cities. The new electrified network will also



improve connectivity across the region and



ultimately drive further business investment

and economic growth.

Daily EMU services will not begin

immediately on all sections of the newly

electrified network including the Newmarket

to Swanson link. Auckland Transport

will progressively roll out electric train

passenger services through until 2015 and

KiwiRail will continue to provide support

during this transitional period.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
At 11:00 pm on Monday 29 September,



the first EMU ran on the North Auckland

Line from Newmarket to Swanson — an



historic milestone marking the effective



completion of the AEP project.



“The successful run to Swanson means that

electric units have now travelled on the entire

electrified network,” says Allan Neilson, Manager

Traction and Electrical Engineering. “There will

still be some residual tidy-up work and testing

to be completed. Everything on the network is

operating safely and the infrastructure job is

now essentially done.”

The completion of the Auckland Electrification

Project (AEP) is the culmination of more than

seven years of intensive work and over a billion

dollars in government investment spanning two

major projects — DART (Developing Auckland’s

Rail Transport) and the electrification of the

Auckland metro network.

“These are two of the biggest and most

important rail infrastructure projects

undertaken in New Zealand for decades.

They have consumed around two million

hours of work and presented significant

engineering challenges. Drawing these

massive programmes to a successful

conclusion is a huge achievement,” says

AEP Project Director, Nicholas French.

The AEP has involved the installation of

3,500 foundations and masts, carrying

560 km of overhead lines across 175 km

of track and accounted for a total of over a

million hours worked.

“Throughout the electrification project, we

had some minor environmental issues, zero

medical-time injuries and just three minor

loss-of-time injuries. That’s an amazing

achievement for a project of this scale.

It’s a credit to all involved in the project —

from the crews working night shifts to string

lines to the project teams planning work

schedules,” says Nicholas.

The safety record of our staff and crews

also forms a part of a wider safety initiative

as the introduction of faster, quieter electric

trains brings with it new safety hazards and

risks for the public.



“To address these needs the deployment



of physical safety measures around

overhead wires has followed international

best practice guidelines and we’ve taken

a region-wide, multi-agency approach



to getting the safety message across to



the public. We’re working with Auckland

Transport, the New Zealand Transport



Agency and Transdev in delivering



messages to the public about always being

vigilant, attentive and responsible around

the new electric infrastructure and trains,”

says Nicholas.

Significant innovations and the use of



advanced technology also formed an



important part of the electrification project.

These included the design and build of

a new SCADA control system and an

upgrade of the Traction Control Centre in

Wellington.

The electrification project also triggered

complete re-signalling of the Auckland

metro network. “A key component of this

was the more effective technical integration

of the signal and traction systems,” says

Allan Neilson. “These innovations were

notable when compared to standard

international practice.”

The new signalling allows bi-directional

operation and Automatic Route Setting.



This enables train control to better manage



train movements around the electrified

network and minimise delays to services.

An automatic train protection system has
















been introduced that has the capacity to



override drivers if they are travelling too



fast towards red lights or exceeding speed

limits.

“There has been significant focus on

deploying technology that will enable greater

levels of automation, communications and

safety across the entire network,” says

Allan, “and that’s a very significant step

forward.”

The completion of AEP moves Auckland

closer to its goal of getting more commuters

out of their cars and into trains as it strives

to become one of the world’s most liveable

cities. The new electrified network will also



improve connectivity across the region and



ultimately drive further business investment

and economic growth.

Daily EMU services will not begin

immediately on all sections of the newly

electrified network including the Newmarket

to Swanson link. Auckland Transport

will progressively roll out electric train

passenger services through until 2015 and

KiwiRail will continue to provide support

during this transitional period.
  wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
How Asset Management kept the power on
When Auckland experienced a major power outage in the early hours of Sunday morning


5 October, we kept the trains running. (Express No263)



What’s less well known is how Property Asset Management kept the power on at the Southdown Depot.

"Our 24/7 FM helpdesk got a call for help at noon that day from the Southdown Depot asking us to organise ancillary power and we were able to get right on to the job," says Jack Crutzen, National Property Asset Manager.

The Property Asset Management Team was able to respond immediately because it had in place comprehensive incident protocols and could support the business through its FM Helpdesk and Auckand- based Regional Facilities Manager.

"It was mission critical," says Jack, "we had to keep the power on both for the traction and electrical systems and to protect our refrigerated freight."

With clear procedures in place Regional Facilities Manager, Steve Ward, was able

to get the job rolling on a moment’s notice. "The first thing Steve did was liaise with our electrical contractor and equipment supply companies. He got their commitment to provide generators to power the onsite reefer bays as well as the gate house to protect Freight Operations and provide security for the site. He also ensured a reliable fuel supply for all generators. That’s where the people side of the business kicked him. Steve knows his suppliers and keeps in regular contact so the trust was there right away. Business is always about people and that was certainly the case on Monday 5 October," says Jack.

Steve then concentrated on organising generators to supply power to the lighting towers so operations could continue. "That was no easy task as the whole of Auckland was on the hunt for generators. The demand for generators was huge and I reckon half of South Auckland was queuing up and screaming out for three phase generators. Again contacts proved all important and we got priority treatment," says Steve.

Throughout the outage Steve and the FM Helpdesk kept in regular contact and also

liaised with the KiwiRail depot manager, the electrical contractor and the equipment supplier. This ensured that all parties understood the requirements and their part in the whole operation.

Steve inspected the site early Sunday evening to ensure all generators were working and the power supply resumed later that evening. The Asset Management Team retained the generators until advised that the power supply was repaired and reliable.

This was followed up with some evaluation sessions to discuss how we’d done and identify any opportunities to improve for the next incident.

"It is testament of the value of a ‘one team’ approach. All rapidly committed to ensuring a prompt and effective response for KiwiRail Southdown. Not only the rapid response but also the risk management approach around service delivery ensured that there was nomajor business disruption. It all went very smoothly and was a credit to everyone involved. As they say, ‘good service is when you don’t even notice it’ and that’s just how it went," says Jack.

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