It's the economy, stupid!

 
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
I made the mistake of dressing up like Liam Helmsworth once and they wouldn't serve me my triple de-caf almond milk latte because I wasn't famous enough and my muscles didn't ripple correctly.
Maybe if you'd tried dressing like a Hemsworth instead....but nahh, the reason you didn't get served is that people can see right through you.
DirtyBallast
As you can tell I'm really up with who's who in Hollywood. Not.

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  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
EDI Downer issues a profit warning on the back of slumping construction and higher costs. Also SEEK is reporting that job adverts overall have fallen by 8.4% nationally:

Kendra Banks, Managing Director, SEEK ANZ comments: “The top three sectors contributing to job ad growth remain unchanged for the month, with Community Services & Development, Healthcare and Education and Training posting near record high job ad volumes.

“Although we’re nearing the end of the year, these sectors continue to offer many opportunities for job seekers. For example, Education and Training has a strong demand for secondary and primary teachers, and childcare and after school carers. The Healthcare and Medical sector is showing demand for general practitioners, aged care nurses and psychologists, counsellors and social workers. We anticipate this demand will continue into the new year.

Kendra continues: “When we look at our state-by-state breakdown we see declining ad volume in the large employing states as they come down from historically high levels. There is still a huge number of employment opportunities across NSW with over 40,000 listed in Sydney right now and in Victoria over 33,000 job opportunities in Melbourne.

The only real growth is in areas that are wholly government-funded, which continues the trend for several years bolstered by NDIS, but overall the number of jobs is falling and it's difficult to paper over that fact.

Also interesting to note that Coles and Woolworths have been the main beneficiaries from Kaufland announcing their exit from the Aussie market, both retailers up strongly today.
  C2 Junior Train Controller

It's the law to advertise job vacancy's even though the job is filled by your mate. ..
data farter  go change Scotty from Marketings Gatta
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
data farter  go change Scotty from Marketings Gatta
"C2"
I'm sure we are all in unanimous agreement with this piece of wisdom.
  billybaxter Deputy Commissioner

Location: Bosnia Park, Fairfield
What rubbish! More likely they could tell from your clothes and hairstyle that you couldn't afford anything in their shop so decided not to waste their time. Positive point, you mustn't have looked like a shoplifter! You sound like a bitter loser who resents people who have worked hard to create a shopping experience that works. Maybe you'd prefer the worker bloke in the pub paradise of an Australian Soviet where the creativity and positive energy that has created Byron would be banned and all shops would be equal, be they in Logan or Byron.
Billy, can be a mistake, judging a book by the cover. Was looking for a car in about 2004, approaching $60K. Simple transaction, no trade and cash sale.
Dressed the part, mullet shorts and no shoes.
Salespersons looked up, and promptly ignored me. Wasn’t given an opportunity to be polite or otherwise.
Proceeded up the Windsor road, to the next dealer and bought the car, that afternoon.
michaelgm
It can be, as your example shows, but I'd say most of the time it's not, that you can judge a book by its cover. The behaviour of the first salepeople may have been from experience, experience that taught them that the overwhelming majority of people dressed as you were were there 'for a look', and 'might come back later'. The loss of the occasional real client trying to prove some personal social belief was a small price to pay for the endless hours that would be wasted dealing with every slob who walked through the door. Maybe they were busy closing a much bigger deal and the following dealing had nothing better to do with his or her time when you walked in? If the behaviour of the first car yard salespeople was chronic I'd say they'd be out of business by now. Are they?

Edit; I was just looking at the closest books at hand, some NSWGR and QR timetables from the 60s and 70s, and in every case the cover is an excellent indicator of what's inside, usually including the word 'timetable' and a picture of a train.
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
Fake signs have sprung up around Sydney telling people that they'll be subject to huge fines if they jog or run without helmets, have fun or laugh out loud, dance, flirt - and people believe it. The Guardian;

At first glance you’ll probably think they’re real. But a series of eye-catching, official-looking signs that have sprung up around Sydney are in fact works of satire.

Produced by an artist and a therapist duo who call themselves Wowser Nation, the works are taking aim at Australia’s creeping nanny state. And they’ve started with the city they believe to be at the forefront of the creep – Sydney – even as the New South Wales government repeals the majority of its draconian lockout laws.

“We take existing rules and regulations and turn up the volume just a bit,” sculptor Clary Akon explains when we meet in one of the rare Sydney coffee shops that stays open till 10pm.

“It’s very telling that people are even partially convinced they’re real.”

People think it's real because we live in a total nanny state that fines you for even thinking bad thoughts. Below some more excellent examples of the Wowser Nation artworks that have been popping up around Sydney:

  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
Retail is looking very bleak all over the world, especially bricks-and-mortar shopping centres. One of the UK's largest shopping centre operators (Intu Properties) announced that it was trying to raise a billion pounds on Monday to try and spend money on their aging shopping centres only to be told by the stock-market that their portfolio is worthless. From Wolf Street;

The company’s shares reacted in time-honored fashion, plunging 8% to a historic low of 21 pence before ending the day down just 1%. Intu’s share price is now 80% lower than it was a year ago and 95% lower than five years ago, leaving the group valued at just £306 million.

Intu owns dozens of malls in the UK, including nine of the 20 biggest ones, and a handful in Spain. It describes itself as a commercial real estate company that is “in the business of helping customers and brands flourish, whether that’s through leasing space in our prime retail and leisure destinations, commercialisation activations or online through our multichannel platform intu.co.uk.” The problem is that many of its clients — mainly large bricks-and-mortar retail chains — are not exactly flourishing; they’re either battling for survival or going out of business...

...The company has £4.7 billion of debt on its books that it cannot service under current conditions, which is why it is asking shareholders to stump up an extra £1 billion of capital. But just how willing will investors be to inject funds worth more than three times the market value of a company whose shares have already collapsed 80% in the last year, at a time when the UK’s retail sector is in the deepest of doldrums?

You could blame the advent of internet shopping for the tough times in retail but the situation is the same all over the developed world; bricks-and-mortar shops can't turn a quid so you've got to conclude that rents are simply too expensive. There's got to be a write-down in the value of the real-estate (and therefore the rents) that these shops occupy or they won't survive.
  C2 Junior Train Controller

Well the right only drag down progress with fear , don't know any conservative artists but Hitler and musoline come to mind as people  that would defend stupidity
Don got shares with water traders while farmers commit sucide , spring feed rivers drying up , fracking turns taps into flame Throwers.. got no data on that so I'm a troll. On the destroy Railpage Australia™ but only you guys can say that if you use "economy parashoot' pass
  michaelgm Chief Commissioner

What rubbish! More likely they could tell from your clothes and hairstyle that you couldn't afford anything in their shop so decided not to waste their time. Positive point, you mustn't have looked like a shoplifter! You sound like a bitter loser who resents people who have worked hard to create a shopping experience that works. Maybe you'd prefer the worker bloke in the pub paradise of an Australian Soviet where the creativity and positive energy that has created Byron would be banned and all shops would be equal, be they in Logan or Byron.
Billy, can be a mistake, judging a book by the cover. Was looking for a car in about 2004, approaching $60K. Simple transaction, no trade and cash sale.
Dressed the part, mullet shorts and no shoes.
Salespersons looked up, and promptly ignored me. Wasn’t given an opportunity to be polite or otherwise.
Proceeded up the Windsor road, to the next dealer and bought the car, that afternoon.
It can be, as your example shows, but I'd say most of the time it's not, that you can judge a book by its cover. The behaviour of the first salepeople may have been from experience, experience that taught them that the overwhelming majority of people dressed as you were were there 'for a look', and 'might come back later'. The loss of the occasional real client trying to prove some personal social belief was a small price to pay for the endless hours that would be wasted dealing with every slob who walked through the door. Maybe they were busy closing a much bigger deal and the following dealing had nothing better to do with his or her time when you walked in? If the behaviour of the first car yard salespeople was chronic I'd say they'd be out of business by now. Are they?

Edit; I was just looking at the closest books at hand, some NSWGR and QR timetables from the 60s and 70s, and in every case the cover is an excellent indicator of what's inside, usually including the word 'timetable' and a picture of a train.
billybaxter
Yeah Billy, believe they are still trading. Albeit under a slightly different name.
Agree, sales people of all persuasions likely deal with time wasters and tire kickers regularly.

Personally, I don’t look unless intend to make a purchase.
  Groundrelay Chief Commissioner

Location: Surrounded by Trolls!
So much here with SFA to do with the topic Razz
  Groundrelay Chief Commissioner

Location: Surrounded by Trolls!
You could blame the advent of internet shopping for the tough times in retail but the situation is the same all over the developed world; bricks-and-mortar shops can't turn a quid so you've got to conclude that rents are simply too expensive. There's got to be a write-down in the value of the real-estate (and therefore the rents) that these shops occupy or they won't survive.
don_dunstan
Imagine if Hawke and Keating just did as you suggest and put up the trade barriers including electronic ones. I mean surely they should have predicted that the WWW would allow this. If they had acted then and also stopped automation and computerisation everyone would now have a real job making stuff in factories!
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Retail is looking very bleak all over the world, especially bricks-and-mortar shopping centres. One of the UK's largest shopping centre operators (Intu Properties) announced that it was trying to raise a billion pounds on Monday to try and spend money on their aging shopping centres only to be told by the stock-market that their portfolio is worthless. From Wolf Street;

The company’s shares reacted in time-honored fashion, plunging 8% to a historic low of 21 pence before ending the day down just 1%. Intu’s share price is now 80% lower than it was a year ago and 95% lower than five years ago, leaving the group valued at just £306 million.

Intu owns dozens of malls in the UK, including nine of the 20 biggest ones, and a handful in Spain. It describes itself as a commercial real estate company that is “in the business of helping customers and brands flourish, whether that’s through leasing space in our prime retail and leisure destinations, commercialisation activations or online through our multichannel platform intu.co.uk.” The problem is that many of its clients — mainly large bricks-and-mortar retail chains — are not exactly flourishing; they’re either battling for survival or going out of business...

...The company has £4.7 billion of debt on its books that it cannot service under current conditions, which is why it is asking shareholders to stump up an extra £1 billion of capital. But just how willing will investors be to inject funds worth more than three times the market value of a company whose shares have already collapsed 80% in the last year, at a time when the UK’s retail sector is in the deepest of doldrums?

You could blame the advent of internet shopping for the tough times in retail but the situation is the same all over the developed world; bricks-and-mortar shops can't turn a quid so you've got to conclude that rents are simply too expensive. There's got to be a write-down in the value of the real-estate (and therefore the rents) that these shops occupy or they won't survive.
don_dunstan
Actually I do very much blame online shopping as do most.
https://www.statista.com/statistics/379046/worldwide-retail-e-commerce-sales/

Malls are filled with mostly female fashion, which is rapidly going on line and decreasing price electrical goods. Toys are being replaced with Playstation and tablets etc.

Its not just growth in online trading but decline retail prices in general reducing profits. If I recall correctly, a present I bought for my GF in 1990 was a denim dress and matching jacket from Just Jeans, cost me around $250 on sale and the number I recall because it was the same amount as my previous weeks take home salary. My wife bought something not too dissimilar denim dress recently online, cost A$70, so much for 30 years of inflation?

My wife also just bought online, 4 or 5 pairs of leggings, both causal, dress and exercise. Don't ask me whats the difference, I cannot tell, cost $60 delivered. She's an Project Manger and on Thursday's (same as casual Friday) often wears a dress that she bought on ebay that cost less than her lunch and its 2 years old. She says womens fashion has become alot cheaper and simpler. Go out at night and most people don't dress alot different than during the day, yes the odd one or two is glam'ed up and Dubai does Glam in a big way, but she often wears a dress bought on ebay for less than her first 1-2 drinks. I'd say half my wife's clothes are ebay near new, 2nd hand or sold new with part label removed (excess stock) Many online fashion shops now allow previous buyers to post photos of wearing the items so you can see a what it looks like on a real woman in average lighting, not some Glamazon in a studio.

Listening to the business radio show talk on this very topic, many career women say they now buy on line as they don't have time to wander around a mall. They stick to brands they know as they know and stuff they don't is usually forgiving in style or easily returned or such a low price it doesn't matter. We go into a mall about 3-4 times a year to buy clothes and just filling the gap of what we get on line as I'm very tall with big feet and buying kids clothes online with my DNA is also often not a good outcome. Most of our electrical stuff is bought online, even the parts to repair my kids chromebook.

Online shopping is also a very quick way to price compare, no more walking into different shops. Hell I've bought online while standing in the shop looking at the same TV for 20% more.

Tesla sells most of their cars online although you can book a test drive and they give you 7 days 100% refund option after delivery. I bought my near new Ford Ranger Wildtrac without even bothering to ask for a test drive, found it on line in dealer, did my research and took family in for a test seat for them and me, then wrote a cheque.

The only thing I would always (for now) go into a shop for is Bunnings, my hobbies and food, although we could easily order online our regular stuff here.

Malls need to transform themselves from shopping to entertainment, meet & greet centres or face closure.
  apw5910 Deputy Commissioner

Location: Location: Location.
and Dubai does Glam in a big way
RTT_Rules
Yes, I remember seeing those rich men in the Dubai mega-malls, being followed around by three or four women dressed ENTIRELY in black  Very Happy

About the only glam they had were their handbags.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
and Dubai does Glam in a big way
Yes, I remember seeing those rich men in the Dubai mega-malls, being followed around by three or four women dressed ENTIRELY in black  Very Happy

About the only glam they had were their handbags.
apw5910
You mean their wife and daughters?

You also don't see whats under the abaya, like the high end fashion underwear and high street dress.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
You also don't see whats under the abaya, like the high end fashion underwear and high street dress.
RTT_Rules
High fashion that they're not allowed to show. Like it or not, their dress regime is a uniform of institutionalised oppression.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
You also don't see whats under the abaya, like the high end fashion underwear and high street dress.
High fashion that they're not allowed to show. Like it or not, their dress regime is a uniform of institutionalised oppression.
Valvegear
Yes and no.

The more open minded are often wearing abaya open at the front to show their dress underneath in special occasions and at a wedding for example its female only so no abaya anyway. Need to show off the big heels, hair, make up, boob job etc.

However its not about whether you can see it or not, after all why do women spend $$$ on fancy underwear to where out, no one but her can see it? She is wearing it that is all that matters to her and she will show it off to her husband in private and/or girl friends.

Yes "the uniform" is a form of oppression, but also cultural and many will defend that to the end. Remember this is all they wore for centuries as they couldn't make anything else with the materials they had and what you see today is not the attire of even the early 20th century, its westernised/modernised alot. Other countries have their own equivalents but less so in day to day life, these guys are also changing. The guys wear other stuff more frequently and the abaya isn't just a single type of black dress, with different styles and colours or colour trim, more fitted, open etc.  

I can tell you they see a "suit and tie" as probably not alot different. I've also known alot of western women who have lived in Saudi and say an abaya has its advantages. Its no longer compulsory anymore so lets see how they change. In the UAE, Nationals wear national dress when going to govt offices or work if not wearing a uniform, but less so privately and rarely out of the country.
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
You live in such an advanced and civilised country, don't you RTT.

The best thing about a niquab (full face covering) is that you don't have to bother hiding the beatings. And if you do have to show your face in public, Moroccan TV gives you some great hints on hiding those bruises that your husband gives you - CNN:

The state-owned 2M TV caused controversy with its segment on Wednesday showing a makeup artist covering blue "bruises" on the eyes and cheeks of a model.

"It's a painful and sorrowful topic, but on the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, we will show you the makeup [to cover the signs] of beatings," said the smiling artist. "It is a topic we lack the courage to discuss."

The segment, which apparently also used makeup to create the "bruise," angered activists, who said it normalized domestic violence.

Obviously it IS normal if they're showing you on state TV how to cover it up. Western feminists should hang their heads in shame for not condemning this barbaric behaviour.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
When I see families which have moved here, I have no hesitation in condemning the female uniform. RTT, you can make all the excuses you like but is is brutal oppression - like it or not.
Perhaps you are not familiar with the fact that it gets bloody hot here; yes, even in Melbourne, and here comes the family. Dad, strolling along in tee shirt, shorts and thongs, and mum in head to foot black. Sons copy dad, and daughters are forced into the uniform.
There have been instances here where teenage daughters have tried to wear clothing that the locals do. Some succeed, many don't and the instances we know about have ranged from a beating to death.

Then, I'm afraid that your "suit and tie" analogy just doesn't stack up. I went to a funeral today and wore a suit and tie because I chose to, as a mark of respect. Nobody was standing over me and making me do it.

I am fed to the teeth with this concept that men own women.

It used to the custom here that the husband was boss and the wife was subservient. With a few neanderthal exceptions, we have just about moved on from there.

What's the excuse in a so-called civilized place like Dubai?
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
You live in such an advanced and civilised country, don't you RTT.

The best thing about a niquab (full face covering) is that you don't have to bother hiding the beatings. And if you do have to show your face in public, Moroccan TV gives you some great hints on hiding those bruises that your husband gives you - CNN:
don_dunstan

Same as for Australian women then, but at least with a niquab they still get to go out instead of cowering indoors Sad
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
You live in such an advanced and civilised country, don't you RTT.

The best thing about a niquab (full face covering) is that you don't have to bother hiding the beatings. And if you do have to show your face in public, Moroccan TV gives you some great hints on hiding those bruises that your husband gives you - CNN:

Same as for Australian women then, but at least with a niquab they still get to go out instead of cowering indoors Sad
bingley hall
Probably the lowest point I've ever seen you descend to - trying to justify an entrenched culture of domestic violence by saying "we do it too". Frankly you're a grub.
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
Okay maybe 'grub' was a bit strong. But you should reflect on the fact that in that culture it's perfectly okay to bop your wife if you think she's getting a bit uppity - it's quite clearly spelt out in the hadith and that attitude has no place whatsoever in the modern world and it needs to be unequivocally condemned, not justified through comparative references.

If Islam can't be reformed and these disgusting acts of violence against women criminalised then it has no place in our society - end-of-story.
  DirtyBallast Chief Commissioner

Location: I was here first. You're only visiting.
You live in such an advanced and civilised country, don't you RTT.

The best thing about a niquab (full face covering) is that you don't have to bother hiding the beatings. And if you do have to show your face in public, Moroccan TV gives you some great hints on hiding those bruises that your husband gives you - CNN:

Same as for Australian women then, but at least with a niquab they still get to go out instead of cowering indoors Sad
Probably the lowest point I've ever seen you descend to - trying to justify an entrenched culture of domestic violence by saying "we do it too". Frankly you're a grub.
don_dunstan
Probably the lowest point I've ever seen you descend to - trying to justify filthy coal powered power stations that destroy the planet by saying "others do it too". Frankly you're a grub.
  DirtyBallast Chief Commissioner

Location: I was here first. You're only visiting.
Okay maybe 'grub' was a bit strong. But you should reflect on the fact that in that culture it's perfectly okay to bop your wife if you think she's getting a bit uppity - it's quite clearly spelt out in the hadith and that attitude has no place whatsoever in the modern world and it needs to be unequivocally condemned, not justified through comparative references.

If Islam can't be reformed and these disgusting acts of violence against women criminalised then it has no place in our society - end-of-story.
don_dunstan
Clean up your own backyard first.
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
You live in such an advanced and civilised country, don't you RTT.

The best thing about a niquab (full face covering) is that you don't have to bother hiding the beatings. And if you do have to show your face in public, Moroccan TV gives you some great hints on hiding those bruises that your husband gives you - CNN:

Same as for Australian women then, but at least with a niquab they still get to go out instead of cowering indoors Sad
Probably the lowest point I've ever seen you descend to - trying to justify an entrenched culture of domestic violence by saying "we do it too". Frankly you're a grub.
Probably the lowest point I've ever seen you descend to - trying to justify filthy coal powered power stations that destroy the planet by saying "others do it too". Frankly you're a grub.
DirtyBallast
Trying to score points off me by trivialising domestic violence... what a champ.

Long story short: We can do something about ethic women being subjected to violence on our shores because they're subjected to our laws. There's nothing we can do about other nations like India and Indonesia developing their vast brown coal fields to burn for electricity, it is completely and utterly beyond our control.
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
Okay maybe 'grub' was a bit strong. But you should reflect on the fact that in that culture it's perfectly okay to bop your wife if you think she's getting a bit uppity - it's quite clearly spelt out in the hadith and that attitude has no place whatsoever in the modern world and it needs to be unequivocally condemned, not justified through comparative references.

If Islam can't be reformed and these disgusting acts of violence against women criminalised then it has no place in our society - end-of-story.
Clean up your own backyard first.
DirtyBallast
We have. Domestic violence is taken very seriously and always persecuted to the maximum extent of the law in this country - but it depends on the willingness of the victims to make statements to the police and cooperate with enforcement. It doesn't always happen in Australia because there's still some communities in which domestic violence is regarded as the prerogative of the man and nobody's business but theirs.

Again, I'm astonished that there are people here prepared to defend that attitude - it's almost like you're saying "it's not their fault"?

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