Speeding trucks to be grounded on the spot in push for tough new road safety law

 
Topic moved from News by bevans on 05 Jul 2016 14:58
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
About time this was implemented across Victoria but should be across the country since almost 1 in 5 ceases now involves a heavy vehicle. 

If the government was serious about road safety it would be finding rail upgrades and mandating more freight on rail.

Speeding trucks to be grounded on the spot in push for tough new road safety law

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  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Yeah, impound a freezer van of prawns or a truck of livestock. It is all talk and will never happen.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Yeah, impound a freezer van of prawns or a truck of livestock. It is all talk and will never happen.
YM-Mundrabilla

Sounds to me like the perfect disincentive to speed?
  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland
Yeah, impound a freezer van of prawns or a truck of livestock. It is all talk and will never happen.
YM-Mundrabilla
Common sense would see the truck able complete It's Intended journey and unload, from there It would be serenaded.

As to If the offending driver would be able to complete the remainder of the journey, would come down to a case by case basis.
  BDA Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
I think the freight forwarders should be proud to advertise that their loads travel in safe vehicles driven safely .
I reckon cancel the drivers licence if he is caught doing these speeds in heavy vehicles , then impound the vehicle and its load . The freight forwarder/customer would very soon suffer if their loads were shown to be threatening life and limb .
If the truck driver goes broke its still better than wiping out some more law abiding motorist and their family .
All heavy vehicle drivers are responsible for the condition of the vehicle and the way its driven , the authorities should enforce this accountability .
How can anyone justify operating any vehicle in an unsafe manner .
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: Lurking
"Any large heavy vehicle caught driving 15km/h or more above the speed limit would be forced off the road on the spot under tough new laws proposed to take on rogue trucking operators who purposely speed to stay in business.

The proposed new laws would treat any detected speed above 115km/h as hard evidence a heavy vehicle's electronic speed limiter had been illegally tampered with. The truck would therefore be ruled as defective and instantly grounded."


So, what happened to the little 100 sign that used to adorn the rear of trucks? They seem to have disappeared over the past few years. Is the Truck Speed Limit the same as the rest now?

I do 2-3 return trips from Sydney to Melbourne down the Hume each year, and it seems to me that trucks travel at 110 like the rest, some even faster - and that's just in daylight hours, who knows what goes on in the dark.


The trouble with a lot of this is that giving the Police the power is one thing, but the Police must be groaning when a Court later takes the drivers side.
  Gman_86 Chief Commissioner

Location: Melton, where the sparks dare not roam!
As far as I know, there is no legislation that requires all heavy vehicles on Australian roads to be fitted with speed limiters.

Most if not all new trucks (there are still plenty of old unlimited trucks legally operating on the roads) will be fitted with electronic speed limiters from the factory, these systems are not foolproof however, they will not allow a truck to actively accelerate past the speed they are limited to (usually 100km/h, although lower speeds are becoming more common for some of the larger fleets, 90km/h is considered by some experts to be much more benficial from a fuel economy point of view, but I digress) so the vehicle will sit on that limit without going over it, until you travel down a hill. Downhill the truck will exceed the limited speed unless the driver intervenes. For instance, my truck a well maintained 3 year old Volvo, is speed limited to 100km/h, on a long sustained downhill stretch of road I have had it up to 108Km/h, despite the limiter being set at 100km/h. Not an issue when the road in question has a posted speed limit of 110km/h, but in other situations, the driver must use their own abilities to keep the truck from exceeding the posted limit.

Going down hill is never a justifiable excuse for exceeding the posted speed limit.

Regarding the proposed changes to legislation, and their accompanying penalties, the relevant authorites better damn well make sure they have all of their ducks in a line before they start taking peoples livelihoods away, because they haven't always in the past. I have no issue with dodgey operators being held to account, especially if it goes to making the roads safer for everyone else out there, but they can't afford to get it wrong.
  skitz Chief Commissioner

As far as I know, there is no legislation that requires all heavy vehicles on Australian roads to be fitted with speed limiters.

Most if not all new trucks (there are still plenty of old unlimited trucks legally operating on the roads) will be fitted with electronic speed limiters from the factory, these systems are not foolproof however, they will not allow a truck to actively accelerate past the speed they are limited to (usually 100km/h, although lower speeds are becoming more common for some of the larger fleets, 90km/h is considered by some experts to be much more benficial from a fuel economy point of view, but I digress) so the vehicle will sit on that limit without going over it, until you travel down a hill. Downhill the truck will exceed the limited speed unless the driver intervenes. For instance, my truck a well maintained 3 year old Volvo, is speed limited to 100km/h, on a long sustained downhill stretch of road I have had it up to 108Km/h, despite the limiter being set at 100km/h. Not an issue when the road in question has a posted speed limit of 110km/h, but in other situations, the driver must use their own abilities to keep the truck from exceeding the posted limit.

Going down hill is never a justifiable excuse for exceeding the posted speed limit.

Regarding the proposed changes to legislation, and their accompanying penalties, the relevant authorites better damn well make sure they have all of their ducks in a line before they start taking peoples livelihoods away, because they haven't always in the past. I have no issue with dodgey operators being held to account, especially if it goes to making the roads safer for everyone else out there, but they can't afford to get it wrong.
Gman_86

15km/hr is a long way over the speed limit.  Its a huge margin of grace compared to the tolerances given for minor speeding offences.



Simply don't speed!

I was observing a coach driver bring us back from the snow and his speed control.  It was data logging him as the driver.   Coming down a hill the bus was increasing speed and the device warned him.   He soon started to pull the speed back as he didn't want a ping on his log.  The frustrating bit was he was near the bottom of the grade where the momentum would have been an advantage on the next rise.  Hard to make a device smart enough for that.  None the less, he was speeding.  Argument stops there.

One would think that technology would allow all vehicles (cars and trucks) to go to GPS technology which would take a lot of ambiguity out of the speed argument.   Where I work in the mine all the vehicle are speed governed by GPS.   Argue all you like, rules are rules and the device lets you know if you are doing wrong and time to correct your actions.  A lot of people hate the system but in time things settle down to normal.  Consequently the maintenance of the light vehicles went down by 40% too.

I would also suggest that heavy freight also be charged for road usage using GPS depending on where you go, type/grade of road, how heavy you are and what time of day (congested cities at peak times for example).  It would be a huge political football but in reality the opposition to 'paying for what you actually use' is only created when you are currently not paying your fair contribution (runs for cover!) or are used to breaking the law.   Bring on GPS technology I say!
  woodford Chief Commissioner

I was not going to reply to this thread but here goes.................

Now I do sympathise with truck drivers particularly small operators and owner drivers, this is earning money the hardway, but all the same..........

Some random thoughts................

If one  wish's to avoid being fined DON'T SPEED, its that simple.

Road accidents cost society a really MASSIVE amount (Note) and slowing down has for a long time showed this reduces accidents and the effects accidents.

Another effect of slowing down is to reduce fuel consumption, I drive a Landcrusier Troop carrier, its fuel consumption at 85kph is 11kilometres/litre (9 litres/ 100 kilometres or 30mpg) increasing speed to 110kph reduces this by over 25 percent (Note 1). This a difference of getting only 1200 kilometres instead of 1600 kilometres out of a fill (Note 2).

It appears to be getting increasingly common for busses to be fitted with GPS tracking, Wangarrata bus line fleet is so fitted, the drivers told me if you exceed 100kph you will get hauled into the office as soon as you get back to the depot.

Note: An article in the New Scientist some time back said something well over 50 percent of the cost of the hospital system can be directly attributed to road accidents.

Note 1: This is regarded as a really excellent figure for a diesel troop carrier, the vehicle though is fitted with a good set of extractors and a 2 1/2 inch (63.5mm) exhaust system, This is well known to improve the landcrusiers deisel engine no end.

Note 2: It really will do this, the vehicle having 2 90litre fuel tanks, I can get from NE Vic to Quorn in SA on a single fill.

woodford
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
It's not just speed.
On Melbourne's Eastlink yesterday afternoon, a semi carrying both the Linfox and Woolworths brands (yes; I'm happy to name and shame - I've got him on dash cam), was travelling in lane 2 at a fraction over 100 km/h, less than two car lengths behind the black Honda in front of him. A sudden hard brake application in the Honda, and a rear-ender is inevitable.
At 100 km/h, a vehicle covers just under 28 metres a second. If the following driver has average reactions, and is paying full attention, from the time he sees the brake lights, his brain interprets it and causes his leg to move, his foot to shove the brake pedal, and the brakes actually start to bite, will be somewhere between half and three quarters of a second. If it's half a second, he will cover 14 metres at totally undiminished speed. If its three quarters, he'll cover 21 metres. As I said, a crash is inevitable.
It's all part of lack of proper driver training, and an inability to think clearly. So many people drive as though nothing can possibly go wrong.
  Madjikthise Assistant Commissioner

Well for starters they'll need contingencies in case a livestock truck gets done. Also perishable/frozen foods will need to go somewhere as they won't want to be accused of wasting food. Maybe a driver on standby and add the cost to the fine?

As for tailgaters, no amount of training will help. These are the type of people who don't give a crap about anyone else, and are only "sorry" when something happens.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
The trouble with a lot of this is that giving the Police the power is one thing, but the Police must be groaning when a Court later takes the drivers side.
mikesyd
That is the key to the declining standard of living in a quiet enjoyable law abiding community.

I have no idea what is necessary to have the courts wake up to the rights of the community versus the rights of 'criminals' (of all types).

It is chronic when career law breakers on bail re-offend only to get community orders and the like following which they re-offend almost immediately.

The politicians are forever changing laws to appear as if they are doing something when they, actually, are not.

All we need is to have the existing laws applied by the police and enforced by the courts.