Grain Harvest 2016/2017

 
  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
Obviously with Mildura closed and a lot of activity on those lines to get them cleared before shutdown, the other two lines were left to now and it will be a push to clear the silos before harvest.

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  Clyde Goodwin2 Chief Train Controller

With the recent Rainfall across the wheat growing districts it looks as though it will be a normal sized Grain Harvest for this upcoming season so there should be a very good wheat lift programme running for it.
  BigShunter Chief Commissioner

Location: St Clair. S.A.
Cerainly did, Clyde, quite reasonable rain right across the Wimmera, Mallee and even extending through to Bendigo and beyond.
Great timing as we round off the season and get into harvest mode in about a months time.

Below link to BOM;

http://www.bom.gov.au/vic/flood/wimmera_mallee.shtml

BigShunter.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
With the recent Rainfall across the wheat growing districts it looks as though it will be a normal sized Grain Harvest for this upcoming season so there should be a very good wheat lift programme running for it.
Clyde Goodwin2

This is great news for traffic volumes but how will the harvest be managed given Mildura is closed?
  Clyde Goodwin2 Chief Train Controller

With the recent Rainfall across the wheat growing districts it looks as though it will be a normal sized Grain Harvest for this upcoming season so there should be a very good wheat lift programme running for it.

This is great news for traffic volumes but how will the harvest be managed given Mildura is closed?
bevans
I Do not know but as it is at least 6 to 8 weeks before harvest starts anything could be possible.
  rwatts Junior Train Controller

Location: Adelaide SA
I Do not know but as it is at least 6 to 8 weeks before harvest starts anything could be possible.
Clyde Goodwin2
I realise this thread is in the Victoria forum but as an example of how rainfall patterns can mix things up, the first harvest deliveries into silos on Eyre Peninsula were made several days ago. First grain rail transports there scheduled for next month.

Richard.
  Carnot Chief Commissioner

With the recent Rainfall across the wheat growing districts it looks as though it will be a normal sized Grain Harvest for this upcoming season so there should be a very good wheat lift programme running for it.

This is great news for traffic volumes but how will the harvest be managed given Mildura is closed?
bevans
A fair bit might end up trucked to Hopetoun/Murtoa, or Sea Lake/Nullawil, I would imagine.
  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
With the recent Rainfall across the wheat growing districts it looks as though it will be a normal sized Grain Harvest for this upcoming season so there should be a very good wheat lift programme running for it.

This is great news for traffic volumes but how will the harvest be managed given Mildura is closed?
bevans

Well I would think that most of the sites on the Mildura line were emptied before the shutdown.  These sites will fill and the shutdown should cease in December/January, when trains will be able to go back on the line.  I suspect that as the works are moving from the south to north that it may be possible that some of the works on the southern end might be finished before the official shutdown and so may even open earlier.
  cbinyon Train Controller

Location: London, England
It would seem a rationale idea to open southern end early if possible. As mentioned above, Sea Lake would see many trucks transporting grain (189km from mildura). Manangatang even closer (143km distance).
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: Lurking
With the recent Rainfall across the wheat growing districts it looks as though it will be a normal sized Grain Harvest for this upcoming season so there should be a very good wheat lift programme running for it.

This is great news for traffic volumes but how will the harvest be managed given Mildura is closed?
bevans
Just remember that the Export chain is not that fast that grain harvested today needs to be in the Port within a week.

Certainly, the sooner that the handlers sell it for export the better for all, but GrainCorp for example would not be dependent on any one line or area for their sales.

I did ask a farmer relative who lives near the Mildura line a few months back what impact the closure would have, and his answer was "None" as his understanding is that the various sites are very 'fluid' and always fill up during season and gradually move it out over time.

All that grain that has been coming off the Murray Basin lines (and elsewhere) over the past few months would have been harvested last summer.
  BigShunter Chief Commissioner

Location: St Clair. S.A.
Yep, I'd say spot on mikesyd, Just a general observation and after working at Dimboola, not much grain really starts to shift until, well after harvest, March or so.

So we will assume most grain recieval sites have cleared last years grain and are ready for this years onslaught, so most sites will operate as per.

I wouldn't expect there will be trucking to other sites, but we will just wait and see, all grain companies have known what was happening, so plans have been put into place.

Would be surprised if any new track is used prior to completion, all the Politicians and Big Wigs will want a major ceremony for the first train to travel on the track and so they should, it has been a Bloody long time coming.

So I reckon it will be business as usual for recieval sites and when the grain does start to move, the only difference to before, will be there will be 2500 ish tonnes on board and Barreling along at hopefully 80k an hour and I can't wait, for that day.

BigShunter.
  Donald Chief Commissioner

Location: Donald. Duck country.
I have spoken to a few farmers in my area and they stored last years harvest "on farm" and are now selling it at a higher price than the grain companies were giving during harvest.   Their problem is that they now have to cart it all the way to Geelong instead of 20 - 30 km to the local silos = more trucks on the roads as the grain companies no longer take grain at the local silos.   With more opportunity for other rail grain haulage companies on the new standard gauge lines, farmers might be able to take advantage of more competition for their grain as different grain companies use different rail companies.
It makes grain selling and transport a year round proposition removing the rush to get it to port by the end of January.
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: Lurking
I have spoken to a few farmers in my area and they stored last years harvest "on farm" and are now selling it at a higher price than the grain companies were giving during harvest.   ...........  

.......With more opportunity for other rail grain haulage companies on the new standard gauge lines, farmers might be able to take advantage of more competition for their grain as different grain companies use different rail companies.
It makes grain selling and transport a year round proposition removing the rush to get it to port by the end of January.
Donald
Firstly, under the 'old' AWB the farmers only had one place to sell their grain and it was all delivered to the local silo - and were 'drip fed' the payments for same. Deregulation changed all that and now they can sell it to who they wish, but may have to arrange cartage to a site nominated by the buyer.

SSR is a good example of a company who have broadened their horizons and those 180 former coal hoppers seem to be earning their purchase price.
  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland
I have spoken to a few farmers in my area and they stored last years harvest "on farm" and are now selling it at a higher price than the grain companies were giving during harvest.   ...........  

.......With more opportunity for other rail grain haulage companies on the new standard gauge lines, farmers might be able to take advantage of more competition for their grain as different grain companies use different rail companies.
It makes grain selling and transport a year round proposition removing the rush to get it to port by the end of January.
Firstly, under the 'old' AWB the farmers only had one place to sell their grain and it was all delivered to the local silo - and were 'drip fed' the payments for same. Deregulation changed all that and now they can sell it to who they wish, but may have to arrange cartage to a site nominated by the buyer.

SSR is a good example of a company who have broadened their horizons and those 180 former coal hoppers seem to be earning their purchase price.
mikesyd
Also line side grain bunkers seem to be the new tend everywhere, mostly due to their flexibility and ability to use mobile loading equipment, the one thing lacking for train operations Is useful length rail sidings, unless loading can take place on the mainline (that could get maximum flexibility)
  SamTheMan79 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Geelong
Not too sure if this article is paywalled but this mobile shiploader was in operation last week when I ran past Lascelles Wharf here in Geelong-

http://www.weeklytimesnow.com.au/agribusiness/cropping/riordan-grain-services-loads-up-carrier-in-geelong/news-story/6ba57b708d8f4a9168a4076554458a92
  BigShunter Chief Commissioner

Location: St Clair. S.A.
A bit more news, here as regards to the rain throughout the Wimmera and Mallee, and quite a good description of how this rain will increase, crop yields.
There will be some very pleased farmers, in the region, at the moment.

Timely rain boosts crop prospects in the south;

WHILE rain in the northern cropping zone is too late to be of optimum use, Victorian growers are celebrating a critical October rain which will bolster on-farm income across the State’s north-west by up to $300 million.

There were widespread falls of between 10-20mm through Victoria’s major cropping regions, the Wimmera and the Mallee, with crops at a critical stage in their development.


Link; Wimmera MailTimes;

http://www.mailtimes.com.au/story/4984892/multi-million-dollar-rain-boost/?cs=225

BigShunter.
  Trainplanner Chief Commissioner

Location: Along the Line
Good news
  BigShunter Chief Commissioner

Location: St Clair. S.A.
I have spoken to a few farmers in my area and they stored last years harvest "on farm" and are now selling it at a higher price than the grain companies were giving during harvest.   Their problem is that they now have to cart it all the way to Geelong instead of 20 - 30 km to the local silos = more trucks on the roads as the grain companies no longer take grain at the local silos.   With more opportunity for other rail grain haulage companies on the new standard gauge lines, farmers might be able to take advantage of more competition for their grain as different grain companies use different rail companies.
It makes grain selling and transport a year round proposition removing the rush to get it to port by the end of January.
Donald

Interesting, Donald, it sounds like making very hard work to earn a $$$

Lets say you have 500 tonne of H2 or ASW ( varieties of wheat, for those not in the know ) and your going to truck it to Geelong, from Donald, that's a least a 7hr round trip, your carting 30 tonne at a time, you'd wanting too make quite a hell of a lot more than the original price.
Even if you where back loading with fertilizer for half the trips, hmmm

BigShunter.
  Trainplanner Chief Commissioner

Location: Along the Line
This is perhaps why farmers in an arc radiating from Bridgewater - Marong are proceeding with a new grain handling facility which on other threads has had some discussion about activating a portion of the Inglewood to Bridgewater section and providing SG access to it.

The change in grain handling means we are seeing increasing movement of containerized grain and the network needs facilities like Dooen, located at Donald (does handle containerized grain but needs a makeover), etc to capture containerized as well as bulk grain.
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
North of Ouyen apparently fell over a week or ten days ago, several mid/high 30's temp, alot of Mallee and northern Wimmera on a knife edge, rain  saved it, for a while, South West of state probably still under water.
  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
I have spoken to a few farmers in my area and they stored last years harvest "on farm" and are now selling it at a higher price than the grain companies were giving during harvest.   Their problem is that they now have to cart it all the way to Geelong instead of 20 - 30 km to the local silos = more trucks on the roads as the grain companies no longer take grain at the local silos.   With more opportunity for other rail grain haulage companies on the new standard gauge lines, farmers might be able to take advantage of more competition for their grain as different grain companies use different rail companies.
It makes grain selling and transport a year round proposition removing the rush to get it to port by the end of January.
Donald
I wonder whether this is a temporary situation given the conversion works.  I doubt farmers are selling direct to end users with delivery at the port, and are doing what they always do and sell to buyers who have a local presence.  The buyers may have their delivery sites 'locked out' given the project and so need to get stocks delivered direct to port.

On the direct delivery to port, it must also cost more at that end I would imaging in storage costs, given it probably takes longer to assemble a shipload using road than rail.  Can anyone confirm?
  james.au Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney, NSW
North of Ouyen apparently fell over a week or ten days ago, several mid/high 30's temp, alot of Mallee and northern Wimmera on a knife edge, rain  saved it, for a while, South West of state probably still under water.
wobert
What do you mean by 'fell over'?  As in the crops are a write-off??
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
Just about stuffed
  x31 Chief Commissioner

Location: gallifrey
This is perhaps why farmers in an arc radiating from Bridgewater - Marong are proceeding with a new grain handling facility which on other threads has had some discussion about activating a portion of the Inglewood to Bridgewater section and providing SG access to it.

The change in grain handling means we are seeing increasing movement of containerized grain and the network needs facilities like Dooen, located at Donald (does handle containerized grain but needs a makeover), etc to capture containerized as well as bulk grain.
Trainplanner

It is more expensive to fill a container with grain that a wagon with bulk shipping?
  BigShunter Chief Commissioner

Location: St Clair. S.A.
Also line side grain bunkers seem to be the new tend everywhere, mostly due to their flexibility and ability to use mobile loading equipment, the one thing lacking for train operations Is useful length rail sidings, unless loading can take place on the mainline (that could get maximum flexibility)
Nightfire

I wouldn't say bunkers are a new trend, they have been around the Horsham area for 25 years or so, I would say you are noticing them more, because over the past decade and longer, a lot of the smaller recieval sites have closed and grain companies have been compacting their sites into a few large one instead of heaps of smaller sites, also a heap of the the old concrete silos have gone to the pack,which we have discussed before.

the one thing lacking for train operations Is useful length rail sidings

Not sure, what you mean by this, grain sites are either equipped to load trains or not, are you referring to a particular site ?

BigShunter.

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