C30T RTR HO scale - Wombat Models surprise release

 
  a6et Minister for Railways

Changing the subject a bit, the electrical connector on the 6 wheel Wombat type tender fitted to my Ixion 32 is now so loose you can see the inner piece slopping around as (if) the loco condescends to move. I don't think I've been careless in any way. Do others have this issue?
These type of fittings are not really designed to be removed all the time and the more you use it this way the looser it will get. They are mainly made to used on a once in a blue moon type of thing and then only if necessary. As long as the connector still conducts I would not worry that much, but at some point you might be better rewiring the tender to the loco on a more permanent basis. Most modern connectors for electronics are the same once you connect them leave them that way, unless something really happens and you have to change over a component or some such in the equipment.
DJPeters
One of our chief installers of decoders, removes the connectors and hard wires them between engine and tender, he gets many models in for problems with poor plug/socket connections, with the hard wiring resolving the problems.

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  The railway dog Junior Train Controller

DJ & a6
Thanks for the replies. I agree that the connector seems to've been produced on the assumption that it'll almost never come apart. But this makes no allowance for detailing, painting & weathering or troubleshooting. As things stand it's unusable, too loose to make any reliable contact. So I think hard wiring's the way to go.
  TheMeddlingMonk Deputy Commissioner

Location: The Time Vortex near Melbourne, Australia
I have to agree with the above comments. Unfortunately those types of connectors that I have seen used for steam locos (between engine and tender) are usually intended for permanent installs (think PCBs or laptops, etc.) where they might be disconnected a few times over the life of the product. Typically they have a very limited number of cycles (often less than 10).
  catchpoint Assistant Commissioner

Location: At the end of a loop
I have to agree with the above comments. Unfortunately those types of connectors that I have seen used for steam locos (between engine and tender) are usually intended for permanent installs (think PCBs or laptops, etc.) where they might be disconnected a few times over the life of the product. Typically they have a very limited number of cycles (often less than 10).
TheMeddlingMonk

So our importers have been provided with a part on their products that are not "fit for purpose" then.

I dont recall any advice in the box that suggests to limit the number of times I am / should connect / disconnect between loco and tender.

Regards,

Catchpoint
  TheMeddlingMonk Deputy Commissioner

Location: The Time Vortex near Melbourne, Australia
To be fair, the importers probably aren't aware of that.

It really depends on the quality of the connector. The really cheap ones won't last more than a dozen cycles. Higher quality ones will last a few hundred. The size of the connector doesn't help, though; it increases the likelihood of wear-and-tear on the connector housing and pins when disconnecting and reconnecting. A lot of these are just friction fit.
  catchpoint Assistant Commissioner

Location: At the end of a loop
To be fair, the importers probably aren't aware of that.

It really depends on the quality of the connector. The really cheap ones won't last more than a dozen cycles. Higher quality ones will last a few hundred. The size of the connector doesn't help, though; it increases the likelihood of wear-and-tear on the connector housing and pins when disconnecting and reconnecting. A lot of these are just friction fit.
TheMeddlingMonk
Noted, that they may not be aware,

However I suppose if it was specified at the start by a better informed importer (like livery colours etc.) to last more than a dozen cycles then we may end up without this problem

Regards,

Catchpoint
  TheMeddlingMonk Deputy Commissioner

Location: The Time Vortex near Melbourne, Australia
To be fair, the importers probably aren't aware of that.

It really depends on the quality of the connector. The really cheap ones won't last more than a dozen cycles. Higher quality ones will last a few hundred. The size of the connector doesn't help, though; it increases the likelihood of wear-and-tear on the connector housing and pins when disconnecting and reconnecting. A lot of these are just friction fit.
Noted, that they may not be aware,

However I suppose if it was specified at the start by a better informed importer (like livery colours etc.) to last more than a dozen cycles then we may end up without this problem

Regards,

Catchpoint
catchpoint
Agreed. Although for the smaller operations where there are only one or two people, it wouldn't surprise me if they didn't think of these sorts of things. The customer is going to be more vocal about the livery and detail usually, so that's probably where most of the focus is. Unfortunately it means these sorts of things can get overlooked.

Hopefully the manufacturers keep an eye on threads like this and will be aware of the need for quality connectors.
  c3526blue Deputy Commissioner

Location: in the cuckoos nest
To be fair, the importers probably aren't aware of that.

It really depends on the quality of the connector. The really cheap ones won't last more than a dozen cycles. Higher quality ones will last a few hundred. The size of the connector doesn't help, though; it increases the likelihood of wear-and-tear on the connector housing and pins when disconnecting and reconnecting. A lot of these are just friction fit.
Noted, that they may not be aware,

However I suppose if it was specified at the start by a better informed importer (like livery colours etc.) to last more than a dozen cycles then we may end up without this problem

Regards,

Catchpoint
Agreed. Although for the smaller operations where there are only one or two people, it wouldn't mbysurprise me if they didn't think of these sorts of things. The customer is going to be more vocal about the livery and detail usually, so that's probably where most of the focus is. Unfortunately it means these sorts of things can get overlooked.

Hopefully the manufacturers keep an eye on threads like this and will be aware of the need for quality connectors.
TheMeddlingMonk
…. and then the factory substitutes a cheap unreliable connector for the expensive reliable one specified by the importer (without the importers knowledge or approval).  The importer is then stuck with the dilemma of importing a brumby (unknown until after the problem is found by customers).  What to do?  ….

Happy delivering,

John
  Oscar Train Controller

Changing the subject a bit, the electrical connector on the 6 wheel Wombat type tender fitted to my Ixion 32 is now so loose you can see the inner piece slopping around as (if) the loco condescends to move. I don't think I've been careless in any way. Do others have this issue?
The railway dog
Hi TRD, when you say "the inner piece slopping around", is that referring to part of the socket in the tender, or the plug of the engine slopping around when connected? I'm just having trouble picturing whether something has broken in the socket or the plug is now very loose and isn't gripping. If everything is still intact, no broken pieces, did you try bending the pins very slightly with a small flat blade screwdriver?  If not I'd have a go at that first, can always hardwire after if it doesn't work.

Obviously the one I've been mucking around with the most has been separated and coupled numerous times but bending the pins very slightly on both my models worked in keeping electrical continuity and physical connectivity. The socket in the tender is a bit loose but I can't see it going anywhere with two solid moulded lugs bracing the rear corners of the socket.  The wires of the engine's plug has some tiny freeplay but nothing unexpected.  When the plug is pushed home with a screwdriver, bit by bit, the wires will push back a smidgeon in the plug's moulding, but the connection is firm.

You wouldn't think these connections would work loose but ideally these plugs/sockets would have a small sprung detent on the sides or similar providing a positive lock, holding them together but allowing repeated disconnections.
  The railway dog Junior Train Controller

Hi Oscar
Yes, the white plug piece attached to the locomotive is very loose in its receptacle in the tender, sliding around.  I expect to be busy with other stuff for a bit, but will give your idea of bending the pins a go. If that doesn't work then it's hardwiring. And agreed there should be a mechanical lock on the connectors instead of just relying on the friction of the pins.
  TheMeddlingMonk Deputy Commissioner

Location: The Time Vortex near Melbourne, Australia
If bending the pins, please be careful. It's easy to damage the pins (especially if using pliers or similar) and create burrs in the pins themselves (apart from twisting them out of alignment) that will either damage or accelerate wear on the receptacle.
  a6et Minister for Railways

Hi Oscar
Yes, the white plug piece attached to the locomotive is very loose in its receptacle in the tender, sliding around.  I expect to be busy with other stuff for a bit, but will give your idea of bending the pins a go. If that doesn't work then it's hardwiring. And agreed there should be a mechanical lock on the connectors instead of just relying on the friction of the pins.d
The railway dog
Doggy, I haven't looked at my 30T as layouts still out of commission, do you have any Eureka or Austrains steam models especially the early ones that had the male & female connectors that required you to push them in and get a definite contact with a ridge like feel as it was fully inserted (not sure how else to say it)  These sockets were quite firm and swivelled on tender and loco, are the ones on the Wombat model the same as the older types?

I had some minor issues with getting my Eureka Garratt connected at times and got into the habit of checking both the male and female connectors especially the male one as any small deviation on a pin could cause issues and worst case bend a pin to make them unusable.

An alternative to hard wiring may be to get a different connector and use, TCS make some quality connectors with various amounts of wiring set ups, have a check here & depending on where you live they can be sourced locally MRRC at Blacktown could help there but check the TCS webb site and have a think.
http://tcsdcc.com/accessories/connectors
  railmod Chief Train Controller

Hi Oscar
Yes, the white plug piece attached to the locomotive is very loose in its receptacle in the tender, sliding around.  I expect to be busy with other stuff for a bit, but will give your idea of bending the pins a go. If that doesn't work then it's hardwiring. And agreed there should be a mechanical lock on the connectors instead of just relying on the friction of the pins.d
Doggy, I haven't looked at my 30T as layouts still out of commission, do you have any Eureka or Austrains steam models especially the early ones that had the male & female connectors that required you to push them in and get a definite contact with a ridge like feel as it was fully inserted (not sure how else to say it)  These sockets were quite firm and swivelled on tender and loco, are the ones on the Wombat model the same as the older types?

I had some minor issues with getting my Eureka Garratt connected at times and got into the habit of checking both the male and female connectors especially the male one as any small deviation on a pin could cause issues and worst case bend a pin to make them unusable.

An alternative to hard wiring may be to get a different connector and use, TCS make some quality connectors with various amounts of wiring set ups, have a check here & depending on where you live they can be sourced locally MRRC at Blacktown could help there but check the TCS webb site and have a think.
http://tcsdcc.com/accessories/connectors
a6et
Hi A6ET,
couple of photos on Page 7 & also on page 3 by Oscar of an upsidedown loco shows the plugs.

Cheers
Alex.
  Oscar Train Controller

Regarding bending the pins, it's only very slight. Check this pic below.  The pins are fairly stubby and only stick out 2mm. I put the flat blade screw driver in between them and just bend them a little sideways using the base of an adjacent pin as a fulcrum.




When I attach the the tender I don't touch the plug at all. I hold the tender's socket up to the plug until the plug sits loosely into the socket. I put the tender's pin in the drawbar and set the model down as below. The plug is loosely sitting there.




I then use that flat bladed screw driver side on, pushing on the socket on one side, then the other, maybe from the top and keep going around till the plug is fully seated home like below. Usually only takes two goes around. The tender's pins are tapered to a point and despite being very slightly skewed they find their slots and the plug stays put.

  Oscar Train Controller

I'm remotoring my C30Ts. If you're Wombats are chipped I'm guessing you'll have no desire or need to change out the motor and will question what's the point. Indeed the OEM motor has no trouble emulating realistic starts with DCC. For example, check out Marcus Ammann's video showing a smooth start and acceleration on DCC.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9wNzDp0q_Q


But if you're DC, I refer back to a number of posts ago where it's noted the Wombat 30T and Ixon C32 leap to life unrealistically but can coast to a nice stop. In this video and using a Gaugemaster controller the engine will move at about 2 volts and stall at around 0.9 volts.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dSQI5nfTr9U

I thought it might be due to some bits in the lighting circuitry or on the PCBs sucking up power, but after digging through the tender and engine a couple of weeks back and isolating the motor it became clear the motor is the culprit. When I removed the motor and turned it by the flywheel I noticed some cogging and six identifiable movements. With two magnets I presumed it was three pole.


When disassembled, sure enough it was straight wound and three pole.




I'm not experienced or knowledgeable about remotoring but have read a few things to remember which have reappeared when searching for candidates.
- five pole motors seem to be better than three pole motors
- skew wound as opposed to straight wound, better still.
- five pole and skew wound together, bees knees
- fit the biggest motor possible
- a longer motor can negate the need for flywheels
- Mashima and NorthWest Short Line (NWSL), top quality and pretty much the only choice for replacements

The OEM motor body measures 10mm on the flat, 12mm on the oval and 15mm in length. The shaft is 1.0mm and the worm has a pitch of 1.25 with 5.2mm OD, 3.45mm ID. (I'm not overly familiar with quoting thread sizes but hope that makes sense)

The candidates for replacement motors include:

Mashima 1015, 1020 and 1024. These motors are ideal being 5 pole and skew wound but they have a 1.5mm shaft which means the worm and flywheel have to be drilled, or another worm and flywheel sourced. The 1015 has the same measurements as the OEM motor (10 x 12 x 15mm), but isn't exactly a drop in replacement which I'll explain soon. These motors are still available from various sources. Casula Hobbies (where I got mine from), ebay and Hollywood Foundry to name a few. I haven't been in contact with Geoff from HF but his closing down sale has the cheapest Mashima's I've seen http://www.hollywoodfoundry.com/default.htm

NWSL 1215D-9, 1220D-9, 1225D-9.  The sizes of these three are all 10mm on the flat, 12mm on the oval and in lengths of 15, 20 and 25mm. The first one (1215D-9) is the same size as the OEM and Mashima 1015, ie 10 x 12 x 15mm. The 1215 and 1220 also have 1.0mm shafts which means the worm and flywheel can be used unmodified. The 1225 has a 1.2mm shaft but may be a bit long regardless.  The NWSL motors are all 3 pole in this size and straight wound. I had doubts they'd be any better than the OEM motor however an email received by them said there's zero cogging and a smooth power curve. I've had trouble getting them locally so next pay day will put an order in direct.

The longest motors Mashima 1024 and NWSL 1225 will be too long to use the flywheel.  The 1024 will hopefully fit with the second shaft cut off. I've found the flywheel is not needed.

The 1020 and 1220 I'm still trying to get hold of but I'm making a prediction that these two will be the sweet spot so far as the flywheel may not fit but the extra torque and length of the motor will assist in maintaining smooth slow speed.

The shortest motors, 1015 and 1215 are the physical match to the OEM. The 1015 I've tested with great success. I'm hoping the 1215, when I get hold of one, will prove to be just as good and a true drop in replacement without any modifications.

Testing the Mashima 1015 and 1024.  
All the motors mentioned should physically fit in the same spot the OEM motor vacated, but note the locating/retaining tab in the boiler between the leading driving wheels. The 1015 should fit but it doesn't so the tab had to be removed, the one modification I was trying to avoid.


I used a Dremel and die grinder bit, same as used in the tender mod, to remove the locating tab. The area has to be shaved back so there's no raised bits to mess with motor alignment.


This is the 1015 fitted. The cage fits perfectly. The 1024, same deal, although it is a tiny bit too long. It will have to have it's second shaft removed and the boiler will hopefully clear the length of the motor.



Here's the vid. I prefer the 1024. There is a tiny bit of cogging in the 1015 whereas there's none I can feel in the 1024. This Wombat chassis has a little bit of binding in the mechanism which is due to siderods, or gears. The 1015 will hesitate a little at the same spot but the 1024 readily overcomes it, particularly noticeable during the constant crawl test.

Anyway, check the vid below which has a really good demo of the 1015 v's OEM on the same track, 1024 performance and some scale speed comparisons.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEjoJWapt7Q&feature=youtu.be
  NSWRcars Chief Train Controller

I'm remotoring my C30Ts.

The candidates for replacement motors include:

Mashima 1015, 1020 and 1024.

NWSL 1215D-9, 1220D-9, 1225D-9.  
Oscar
Hi Oscar, you’ve convinced me to re-motor my Ixion C32. Can you please advise the weight of the OEM and replacement motors, with flywheel (where fitted)? If there is any significant difference, it may influence my choice. Thank you very much for this!

Edit: Specs sheets give the Mashima motor weights as 1015-5g, 1020-8g, 1024-9g. Weight of the OEM flywheel and OEM motor would be a help.

My thought now is to fit a Mashima 1020. Discard the flywheel and if there’s room left, fit a static lead weight to that end of the motor.
  Oscar Train Controller

Those weights are interesting, I never thought to measure them.  Weight of the OEM motor is 6g, flywheel is 4g. I can't measure mg but together they measure 10g. I like your idea of packing out the rest of the flywheel area with lead. Plus there's more than enough room to not only account for any weight difference but to add some like around the motor retaining cage.  I hope the Ixon is the same in every regard.

A few points I need to expand on to anyone attempting the same. The worm and flywheel needed to be bored out to 1.5mm for the Mashima shafts which I briefly mentioned. I don't have a lathe or mill to accurately do this and my drill press' runout is ridiculous, so I needed to do it by hand. I was worried about messing the bores' alignment but rather than using a pin vice I used a cordless drill, thick shaft drill bits and vice, stepping up in diameter from 1.0mm through 1.2, 1.3 then 1.5mm.

For the worm in particular I drilled from both sides to try and minimise the bore going off centre. The 1.5mm drill bit did run through though because I went too fast. Fortunately it didn't ream the bore to something larger and it's a firm fit on the Mashima shaft. For the flywheel however, whatever bit of burr or scratch in the bore that led to a tight fit for the new motors was dislodged after it's first fitment. Then it became a bit loose.

Depending on the accuracy of your drill bits or method used to ream out the bore it's highly likely that the flywheel or worm wont be a tight fit and will need something to attach them. To avoid soldering, gluing, threadlocker or similar, I used a tiny bit of blutac covering the hole of the flywheel and pressed it on the shaft. It worked perfectly.

To remove the flywheel and worm in the first place from the OEM motor, I don't have a puller or special tools and fashioning some kind of pin press to be small enough to punch out a 1mm shaft seemed impossible. Instead I put the flywheel in a vice (with jaw protectors and cardboard) and used mutigrips to twist off the worm, (again with cardboard layered around the worm teeth). Essential to protect the parts. The worm separated first which surprised me then I flipped the motor, vise on shaft and grips on flywheel. At all times I applied tension on the shaft only, not on the motor.
  NSWRcars Chief Train Controller

A few points I need to expand on to anyone attempting the same. The worm and flywheel needed to be bored out to 1.5mm for the Mashima shafts which I briefly mentioned.
Oscar
Excellent, thanks. I was going to ask about boring the worm and flywheel. I reckon a Mashima 1020 without flywheel would be the easiest, and surely the 2 gram difference can be more than made up with a lead weight at the flywheel end. The Ixion C32 motor looks identical to the Wombat C30T, and I had already packed a little lead around it. The Ixion might have more room for a longer motor, but a 1020 with extra lead would I think be even better than a 1024.

The OEM motors in these locos are crap!
  comtrain Chief Commissioner

Location: Near Albury Wodonga
I have to wonder if its the Chinese who are stitching up our importers or if its the importers, themselves, who are stitching us up by choosing cheap components. They certainly did for many years by refusing to fit KD's! The Powerline T Class had motor and decoder issues as well.
I hang around some British and US Forums, and I don't hear a lot about inferior motors. Since the Auscision 48's which were probably built to the $220 offered price, it seems that some are replacing the Austrains 30 Class motor, and now the Ixion and Gopher motors are suspect. Even adjusting for the low value of our dollar, we appear to be paying a hell of a lot more for our models as well. Small population is a poor excuse as small runs are also produced in the USA, Canada Taiwan,and England. Check out the size of runs in Turkey, France and other small European countries.
Cheers
Rod
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

I have to wonder if its the Chinese who are stitching up our importers or if its the importers, themselves, who are stitching us up by choosing cheap components. They certainly did for many years by refusing to fit KD's! The Powerline T Class had motor and decoder issues as well.
I hang around some British and US Forums, and I don't hear a lot about inferior motors. Since the Auscision 48's which were probably built to the $220 offered price, it seems that some are replacing the Austrains 30 Class motor, and now the Ixion and Gopher motors are suspect. Even adjusting for the low value of our dollar, we appear to be paying a hell of a lot more for our models as well. Small population is a poor excuse as small runs are also produced in the USA, Canada Taiwan,and England. Check out the size of runs in Turkey, France and other small European countries.
Cheers
Rod
comtrain
While not actual motors Hornby have had a lot of problems with Chinese made locomotives the worst of which was brand new model diesels that the underframe metal section simply disintegrated or broke just taking it out of the brand new box it came in. Hornby have also had a lot of quality control problems as well brand new locomotives assembled badly, things like parts of valve gears that simply fall off the loco in the box before it is even opened, DCC decoders that will only work on Hornby's own controllers and then them claiming that their DCC decoders are NMRA compliant when anyone who knows anything will tell you they are not, their decoders go up in smoke quite often if you read the British model press and modellers are rapidly grinding their gears over these things. Some just stop working for no apparent reason as well.

So models behaving badly are a world wide thing not just in Australia only.

I would hasten a guess here and say the Chinese quote a price for each individual model made but then decide during manufacture of them to cheapen up things mainly because a lot of importers of these models do not have a person at the factory making sure no short cuts are taken. From what I can gather Hornby now have some in China to make sure that all is well but some things do still get through though.
  NSWRcars Chief Train Controller

I have to wonder if its the Chinese who are stitching up our importers or if its the importers, themselves, who are stitching us up by choosing cheap components.
comtrain
It’s all very well to blame “the Chinese”, but how hard can it be to specify a skew wound motor? I wasn’t aware that anything less was standard, these days.

I have bought a Mashima 1020 and will be fitting it to my Ixion C32. Refer to the following picture that shows the 1020 next to the OEM motor. (EDIT: this is actually a 1220 pictured - see Oscar's posting below!)
As you can see there are minor differences to Wombat C30T; slightly different chassis cradle and motor retaining clip. You can also see the lead gearbox wrapper I added, and a small lead weight in the motor retaining clip.

http://users.tpg.com.au/bdayling/modelrail/Ixion-C32-remotor-1.jpg

The C32 chassis cradle will need to be ground to widen clearance of the motor brush housing. I don’t think a Mashima 1024 would fit. There won’t be room for a flywheel, but there will be room for a bit more lead. The C32 has a longer wheelbase than the C30T so there is more scope for weighting. The worm will need to be bored to fit the Mashima drive shaft, which will be cut off at the flywheel end.

I checked the OEM motor and it has horrible cogging, this accounts for the poor starting of these locos. The flywheel probably helps smooth stops. OEM motor will be dispatched to the rubbish!

I anticipate bonding the bored out OEM worm gear to the motor shaft with Loctite.
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

I have to wonder if its the Chinese who are stitching up our importers or if its the importers, themselves, who are stitching us up by choosing cheap components.
It’s all very well to blame “the Chinese”, but how hard can it be to specify a skew wound motor? I wasn’t aware that anything less was standard, these days.

I have bought a Mashima 1020 and will be fitting it to my Ixion C32. Refer to the following picture that shows the 1020 next to the OEM motor. As you can see there are minor differences to Wombat C30T; slightly different chassis cradle and motor retaining clip. You can also see the lead gearbox wrapper I added, and a small lead weight in the motor retaining clip.

http://users.tpg.com.au/bdayling/modelrail/Ixion-C32-remotor-1.jpg

The C32 chassis cradle will need to be ground to widen clearance of the motor brush housing, but otherwise the 1020 should drop straight in. I don’t think a Mashima 1024 would fit. There won’t be room for a flywheel, but there will be room for a bit more lead. The C32 has a longer wheelbase than the C30T so there is more scope for weighting. The worm will need to be bored to fit the Mashima drive shaft, which will be cut off at the flywheel end.

I checked the OEM motor and it has horrible cogging, this accounts for the poor starting of these locos. The flywheel probably helps smooth stops. OEM motor will be dispatched to the rubbish!

By the way, although I haven’t actually done the re-motor job yet, this morning I cut the second shaft off the Mashima 1020. Wrapped the motor in masking tape to protect it from grit, with the shaft projecting through the tape. A few minutes prep, then a few milliseconds with the Dremel at max RPM. I anticipate bonding the bored out OEM worm gear to the motor shaft with Loctite.
NSWRcars
Comes the other thing though you specify a skew wound motor but none are available so then you have to do something as the factory will not like part assembled models just sitting around waiting for motors. But then there is also that it could be that the model was specified to have one but no supplier could be found of the motors to begin the production of them, storing them waiting for the motors is probably not an option the Chinese factory would want to do. So a substitute is then drafted in to complete the models with or without the importers being told. Just saying as it might have been done similar to this.
  Oscar Train Controller

NSWRcars, unfortunately it appears you have a 1220 motor, not a 1020.  When I bought from Casula I got a 1015, 1024, and was given a 1220 and 2010 open frame motor instead of the 1020 and NWSL 1215D-9, as the last two were out of stock. I had to get a 1020 from a local ebayer [b]ublidoowatsit [/b]which is now installed. It wasn't cheap but there's not much choice. There's another seller in the UK and Czech Republic who had a few too.

Compare these pics, first of the two motors I didn't use including the 1220 on the left and then the 1024, 1020 and 1015 stacked on each other.




The problem with the 1220 is that it may not fit in the motor well properly, may sit proud and the worm may not mesh properly. The OEM "H321" is what's printed on the Wombat 30T as well. They look identical. The cage looks nearly exact but this 1220motor is 12mm on the flat and 14mm tall instead of 10 x 12 and whilst I haven't taken mine out of the bag, I will say the cage will not fit. I kept the two motors that wont fit for future use but you should look for one of those others I mentioned, ie the ones in the pic above. A 1015 was still adequate in my opinion.

Below is the OEM and 1015 pulled apart. Amazing that the skew wound with less laminations Mashima outperforms the OEM significantly. The OEM motor looks fine, but for the intended use, the Mashima is so much better. But when I went to look for alternates there's simply no options anymore other than those produced for diesels and larger steam. I read part of the reason Mashima closed was due to loosing the magnet supplier. When you compare below you can see the OEM motor's magnets are thicker but they are not as strong as the Mashimas as is evident when you hold some shafting close to each.  It's unfortunate but I'm guessing the likes of Ixion, Wombat and others don't have any other options, at the moment.





Edit, here's the video of the 1020 installed. Didn't take any pics because it was a bit of a pain putting all the wires back. The mechanism is noisy as stock but with the body on it seems to amplify the mashima after some momentum is gained. I think it's due to there being no insulation under the motor. On the stock motor there was a bit of paper tape which would've insulated some vibrations I believe. So although I may do some tinkering later, I'm stoked with the starting and acceleration improvement.



https://youtu.be/rgvhZQscrrI
  NSWRcars Chief Train Controller

NSWRcars, unfortunately it appears you have a 1220 motor, not a 1020.  
Oscar
Thanks for that Oscar, you are right, it looks like I’ve been sent the wrong motor. It’s a little unfortunate that Casula don’t actually quote the model number but I ordered a 10x12x20. Fortunately I have not yet started fitting the replacement. I will try to source a 1015 or 1020. Edit: the eBayer still has several 1020s and I have one ordered.
  GoldenGirl Station Master

Hollywood Foundry still has good stocks of 1015 motors, plus some larger versions: http://www.hollywoodfoundry.com/default.htm

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