News

 

Showing stories from April 2012

1 2 3 4 of 7 5 6 7

Thousands march for Napier to Gisborne rail line repair

Posted Saturday, 14 April, 2012 by bevans in New Zealand Rail News

Thousands of people have marched in support of Gisborne maintaining a rail link with Napier this morning. 

Gisborne Mayor Meng Foon lead the march today in a bid to convince KiwiRail how important the threatened Napier to Gisborne rail line is. 

The line was washed out in several places during a storm three weeks ago, and the rails are now hanging in mid-air.

$44,000 sting in rail's high-wire act

Posted Saturday, 14 April, 2012 by bevans in Victorian Rail News

A FREE Wi-Fi service for commuters at Melbourne's key train stations is being delayed because a state government-owned authority wants $44,000 to install a single 100-metre optical fibre cable.

VicTrack, landlord to railways operator Metro Trains, also wants to charge the internet service provider behind the Wi-Fi service, Netbay, $34,000 a year to ''monitor'' the cable.

It's official: Indians are going to track and ruin

Posted Saturday, 14 April, 2012 by bevans in International Rail News

India was built on, and runs on, its railways.

Every day across this broad land, more than 20 million Indians ride those rails, and 2.5 million tonnes of freight are carted from farm or factory to market.

For many, and for much produced here, this is the only reliable, affordable way.

Spending on capital works should be seen and not inferred

Posted Sunday, 15 April, 2012 by Speed in New South Wales Rail News

When the Carr government took office in 1995 there was widespread discontent across NSW about inadequate public infrastructure, particularly in health and transport.

Today, there is still a perception that spending on infrastructure is inadequate. But in fact, the NSW government in the past 10 years has more than doubled annual capital works expenditure in real terms - that is, after adjusting for inflation.

They built her for comfort, not speed, but she could still give the XPT a run

Posted Sunday, 15 April, 2012 by bevans in Rail News

Fifty years after the first direct train trip from Sydney to Melbourne, the travel time has barely changed, writes Daniel Lewis.

''ALBURY, all change!'' For nearly 80 years these three words were the curse of anyone catching the train between Sydney and Melbourne. David Burke, 84, remembers the freezing nights when he would drag his luggage across the platform at the border town because NSW and Victoria had built their rail systems on different gauges.

Gisborne rail rally fails to convince

Posted Sunday, 15 April, 2012 by bevans in New Zealand Rail News

KiwiRail is unmoved by Saturday's Gisborne protest where hundreds of residents marched through the city demanding the repair of the region's crippled rail link.

''Nothing's changed from our perspective,'' KiwiRail chief executive Jim Quinn said following the fix the rail rally led by Gisborne mayor Meng Foon.

Train services to and from Gisborne have been cut by three big washouts on a section of line near Wairoa.

Mr Foon said Gisborne's business community, in particular, was worried by the prospect the line could be closed permanently.

Metro staff hid as passengers tended injured man, commuter claims

Posted Monday, 16 April, 2012 by bevans in Victorian Rail News

A woman who came to the aid of a seriously injured man who had fallen between a train and a platform is demanding answers from transport chiefs over why station staff failed to render assistance.

The man required ambulance attention after he fell and hit his head on the carriage floor while boarding at Footscray Station on Saturday about 8:10pm.

His fall left him dazed and dangling half in and out of the carriage.

Passenger Gemma Houston, a healthcare physiologist, acted quickly to press the train's emergency button and, with the help of others, pulled the injured man into the carriage in case the train took off.

My week in myki hell

Posted Monday, 16 April, 2012 by bevans in Victorian Rail News

Let me say at the outset, I was an early adopter of myki. As a former transport reporter for The Sunday Age, it seemed I should really test it out in the field.

I lost my original card last year, at a football game where my team was destroyed by Collingwood and my children and I caught colds. The reason I mention this is that my card was not old, not more than seven months, but it had been trouble for much of that time.

I used to think it was my swiping technique. Other commuters cruised through as I stood there muttering and huffing at the card reader. Then on Wednesday, I took five boys, aged under seven, to the city. Four needed myki cards and I swiped them easily through. My technique was fine. My next job was to top up.

Gheringhap Sightings w/e 14/4/2012.

Posted Monday, 16 April, 2012 by GheringhapLoop in Gunzelling Reports

There were 116 sightings for this week. This is eight sightings more than last week, making a total of 1746 sightings for this year to date. On day 105 last year we had recorded 1475 sightings. This is 271 sightings up on the same time last year.

Railway fight ‘starts today’

Posted Monday, 16 April, 2012 by bevans in New Zealand Rail News

PLACARDS and chanting filled the inner city as about 2000 people marched to save the Gisborne to Napier Rail line on Saturday.

Mayor Meng Foon led the march from the Post Office in Grey Street to the rail yard at the other end of the street, accompanied by pleas to “Do not give our rail the slip” and chants of “We want our rail” .

The march exceeded all expectations. A crowd of about 400 gathered at the start but by the time the march reached the rail yard, it was estimated there was close to 2000 people.

Glimpse of train service in 2021 emerges

Posted Tuesday, 17 April, 2012 by bevans in Victorian Rail News

A GLIMPSE of what Melbourne's train timetable could look like 10 years from now has emerged from a government study into building a new rail line to Monash University and Rowville.

It reveals a plan to run trains as often as every four to five minutes in rush hour on some metro lines, and once every 10 minutes outside the peak.

The three-page ''train service plan'' for the year 2021 was published as an appendix to the lengthy government-commissioned Rowville Rail Study. It also gives an early peek at projected increases to V/Line trains to Geelong, Ballarat and Bendigo once the $5 billion regional rail link opens in 2016.

Major Expansion to Key Norfolk Southern Rail Facility in Ohio

Posted Tuesday, 17 April, 2012 by bevans in International Rail News

BELLEVUE, Ohio, April 16, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- Norfolk Southern NSC +1.19% this month will begin a $160 million project to expand its Bellevue rail yard in Northern Ohio, a project that will double the yard's capacity in order to meet rising demand for freight rail transportation.

"Bellevue is already an important terminal for the classification and movement of freight, and this investment will expand and modernize Bellevue, contributing to the fluid movement of long-distance freight across our rail system," said Mark Manion, Norfolk Southern's chief operating officer. "This project will help us improve asset utilization and efficiency, enhance customer service, strengthen our entire 22-state system, and further confirm Ohio's importance to freight rail transportation."

Regional Rail Link: Reduce rail racket, commands Guy

Posted Tuesday, 17 April, 2012 by bevans in Victorian Rail News

BRIMBANK residents living close to the railway line may need earplugs following a review of noise management as part of the $5 billion Regional Rail Link.

Planning Minister Matthew Guy has directed the Regional Rail Link Authority to come up with a new noise management plan by next March to limit noise from trains that will run on section two of the project between Deer Park and Werribee.

The demand follows an advisory report that found previous management reports and plans "fail to deal reasonably and rationally with the operational noise impacts anticipated", shifting the responsibility back to landowners to pay for noise mitigation.

Bon voyage, Wollongong farewells Iron Monarch for final time

Posted Tuesday, 17 April, 2012 by bevans in New South Wales Rail News

It's a ship that has carried tonnes of steel slabs each year from Port Kembla in Wollongong to the Western Port in Hastings in Southern Victoria, but today is its final journey.

 

The Bluescope-owned bulk carrier has been sold and 650,000 tonnes per year of hot rolled coil will now been transported from Wollongong to Victoria by rail in a deal between the steel manufacturer and rail group Pacific National.

The Southern branch of the New South Wales Maritime Union says the ship has been sold for somewhere between $4m and $5m, despite having a $17m upgrade last year.

The story of Geraldton's old railway station

Posted Tuesday, 17 April, 2012 by bevans in Western Australian Rail News

It is one of the State's most significant heritage buildings serving as railway station, a museum and a library in the past. Today, there is a growing concern for the iconic building as it falls into a state of disrepair. 

 

Rita Stinson is the President of the Geraldton Historical Society and says there is a wide spread concern for the old railway building near Pages beach on Marine Terrace.

"It is so sad to see such a significant building in such a dilapidated state," she says.

"This building is probably one of the most significant heritage buildings in Geraldton and in Western Australia."

March towards more train strain

Posted Wednesday, 18 April, 2012 by bevans in Victorian Rail News

V/LINE figures show that almost one in five Geelong trains were more than five minutes late last month.

The latest V/Line performance figures for March show that just 83.9 per cent of Geelong services ran to within five minutes of their scheduled time, again failing to meet the on-time target of 92 per cent.

The figures also showed that 98.2 per cent of Geelong services ran, meeting the target of 96 per cent of scheduled services to run.

V/Line's Clare Steele said congestion in the metropolitan network was the biggest contributor for late trains, accounting for 21 per cent of the total.

Ms Steele said ill passengers accounted for almost 10 per cent of late trains for the month, when the figure is usually around 2 per cent of causes.

"That often results in a train being held up while an ambulance arrives at the scene," she said.


Light rail for Oxford St campaign begins

Posted Wednesday, 18 April, 2012 by bevans in Tram and Light Rail News

POTTS Point resident and Darlinghurst record store owner Stephan Gyory is leading a campaign to bring light rail to Oxford St.

So far, the public response has been strongly in his favour.

Mr Gyory, of The Recordstore in Darlinghurst, said Oxford St needed light rail to bring commuters back to the area, which had suffered since the Gateway Project in 2004.

Regional Rail Link: Minister, too, cops an earful

Posted Wednesday, 18 April, 2012 by bevans in Victorian Rail News

FOOTSCRAY residents living close to the railway line may need to invest in earplugs following a review of noise management as part of the $5billion Regional Rail Link project.

Planning Minister Matthew Guy recently directed the Regional Rail Link Authority to come up with a new noise management plan by March next year to limit noise from trains that will run on section two of the project between Deer Park and Werribee.

There are no directions for reducing noise for section one, from Moonee Ponds Creek to Deer Park, despite the area being more densely populated and the corridor carrying more trains than outer sections.

Metro sheds staff as V/Line bosses ride the rails

Posted Wednesday, 18 April, 2012 by bevans in Victorian Rail News

More than 50 Metro rail workers have been sacked and a further 58 temporary and vacant positions cut following a review by the rail operator just days before the introduction of a new timetable this weekend.

The job losses, most of which will be in Metro's operations division, were revealed to staff yesterday - the same day car manufacturer Toyota sacked 350 workers from its Altona plant.

Metro corporate relations general manager Leah Waymark said 51 employees were told of the job losses in meetings yesterday and would be leaving the business with full entitlements.

Shepparton’s $7 million rail safety upgrade works completed

Posted Thursday, 19 April, 2012 by Galron in Press Releases

The biggest boost to rail safety in Shepparton in decades is now complete with the completion of a major rail signalling system and crossing safety project, Minister for Public Transport Terry Mulder said today.

Queensland Rail to ditch shorts for train crews because of safety concerns

Posted Thursday, 19 April, 2012 by bevans in Queensland Rail News

THE much-maligned work uniform of tailored shorts and long socks is heading for extinction with the ensemble set to be banned from train stations.

Queensland Rail has indicated shorts will not be part of train crews' new uniform when it is rolled out later this year because of safety concerns, including the heightened risk of skin cancer.

The decree has angered the Rail Tram and Bus Union, which has been in consultation with Queensland Rail about the new look.

State secretary Owen Doogan said it was their understanding that the risk assessment of shorts had not found any negative safety outcomes.

"There's been no approach to us about stopping the issue of shorts. That is something we'd be concerned about," said Mr Doogan.

LIRR: 2 boys burned on third rail

Posted Thursday, 19 April, 2012 by bevans in International Rail News

Two children suffered burns after coming into contact with an electrified third rail on train tracks in Wyandanch, according to a spokesman for the Long Island Rail Road.

One of the children, an unidentified 12-year-old boy, was burned on the right hand, said the spokesman, Sam Zambuto. He was conscious and taken to Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip for treatment.

Company hit with a heavy fine over fatal rail accident

Posted Thursday, 19 April, 2012 by bevans in New South Wales Rail News

A New South Wales company has been fined $200,000 over a rail accident near Maitland that claimed the life of one worker and injured four others.

In March 2009, Sydney Labour hire worker Agamalu Iosefa was killed when rail lines sprang free as a crane was unloading a panel weighing almost 35 tonnes at Farley.

Four other workers suffered serious injuries and one lost part of his arm.

Lawmakers Scrutinize $68B Rail Plan

Posted Thursday, 19 April, 2012 by bevans in International Rail News

A day after a highly critical report on a $68.4 billion high-speed rail proposal, Democrats who control the Legislature said they remained committed to the project while the chairman of the authority that would oversee construction said it's still a risk worth taking.

On Wednesday, lawmakers began evaluating the latest proposal from the California High-Speed Rail Authority in Senate and Assembly hearings. They are considering Gov. Jerry Brown's request to sell about $2.6 billion in voter-approved bonds to begin construction.


Light-rail cost estimate is called into question

Posted Thursday, 19 April, 2012 by bevans in Tram and Light Rail News

The price tag for building a 13-kilometre stretch of light rail from north Canberra into the city could be up to $860 million, according to a new transport study released by the ACT government.

But the announcement sparked a flurry of conflicting claims yesterday about the cost of the project, with light-rail proponents accusing the government of overstating the price.

The ACT Greens said the figure was as much as three times the price of light-rail networks in other cities, a claim disputed by Environment and Sustainable Development Minister Simon Corbell.

1 2 3 4 of 7 5 6 7