Electric rail has people power: stats

 
Topic moved from News by dthead on 17 Mar 2015 09:17
  8077 Chief Train Controller

Location: Crossing the Rubicon
THE Southern Tablelands Rail Users’ Group (STRUG) has been fine-tuning the latest population statistics along the Picton – Canberra rail corridor following the Member for Goulburn Pru Goward’s recent assertion it would require a population of 100,000 to justify electrification.

STRUG has discovered the population along the rail corridor far exceeded the suggested “100,000 persons” for according to available census data and council websites, Wingecarribee Council already had 47,054 residents in 2013 and Goulburn Mulwaree boasted 29,230 people at that time.
Electric rail has people power: stats

A very worthy project.  Why not consider tilt train technology which has operated successfully in Queensland for years.  There would be a strong economic case for the electrification of the Main South to Canberra.  New rollingstock and tilt technology replacing the diesel railcars.  

Once completed you could look at extending the services further south and perhaps west of sydney using the same technology.

I think the point being made.  Why is it "people need to campaign" for these changes and upgrades to services.  What are the people in Sydney doing?  sitting on their hands.  incredible.

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  LancedDendrite Chief Commissioner

Location: Gheringhap Loop Autonomous Zone
Electric traction would make sense if you wanted services with a top speed greater than 160kph or a better than hourly service frequency. The other question to ask is of the electrification system to be used - 25kV AC seems the obvious one, but it's not used in NSW at present.
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
What speeds does the queen and tilt train achieve to rockhampton ?
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

What speeds does the queen and tilt train achieve to rockhampton ?
freightgate
The Rockhampton Tilt Train is allowed 160km/h between Brisbane and Rockhampton (but has been tested to 210km/h). The Spirit of Queensland is allowed 160km/h from Brisbane to Mackay, 140km/h Mackay to Kaili (north of Bowen), 100km/h Kaili to Purono (north of Townsville) and 80km/h Purono to Cairns (and has been tested to 170km/h south of Rockhampton). A plethora of unprotected level crossings north of Kaili, plus mostly light 41kg rail on steel sleepers north of Purono are the main reasons for the lower speeds in North Queensland.
  speedemon08 Mary

Location: I think by now you should have figured it out
The Rockhampton Tilt Train is allowed 160km/h between Brisbane and Rockhampton (but has been tested to 210km/h).
Sulla1
Sounds vaguely similar to the V/locity's.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
The Qld NCL was sparked to Gladstone in the late 80's, yet within 10 years many km of track was realigned wasting I'm guessing millions in todays' money in O/H. Further realignments were also done north of Gladstone.

I believe Tilt train technology is also better suited to long curvy track with a low frequency rail service, ie the Qld NCL. Sparking is also more beneficial in high frequency start-stop operations where regen energy cam be used by others.

The Main South in NSW between Macurthur and Goulburn is a busy part of the network. Take the money you would use to spark it (at a guess $1m/km per track) and realign the track to something more suited. Now the dozen or so freights each way each day are faster, commuter is faster and country services are faster and all burning less fuel and doing less track wear and tear.

With above done, there is no need for new stock at this time because the time saved doing 160km/hr over 140km/hr is minimal as the biggest time saving for lowest cost is likely getting from the current sub 100km/hr line speeds to 120-140km/hr where all services will benefit. But yes future DMU's like the Velocity can still do 160km/hr.

And yes I would also like to see some work done on the Canberra branch to get the trip times down to 1hr using Xplorers which shouldn't be that hard and combined with improvements to the Main South the current services would have their trip times reduced by at least 1hr.

Sparking of the main south and perhaps all the way to Canberra is probably best reserved for when there are decent aligned tracks and further population growth.
  8077 Chief Train Controller

Location: Crossing the Rubicon
Electric traction would make sense if you wanted services with a top speed greater than 160kph or a better than hourly service frequency. The other question to ask is of the electrification system to be used - 25kV AC seems the obvious one, but it's not used in NSW at present.
LancedDendrite

Why would the NSW Government not want the speed to lift.  A more relevant question might be what speed the XPT does through this area considering it is a much heavier train than an EMU would be.

You also need to consider weight.
  normw Junior Train Controller

As '31 diesel' suggested, track realignment should be the first item for review. 'High speed' on track that appears to follow cow trails is a dream. At a rough guess there's about 150 kms of track beyond Macarthur to Canberra, and this should be electrified at 25kV 50Hz, to bring the state into the 20th century while keeping OHW install costs low. Electric locomotives should be dual voltage (+1500vDC) Bo-Bo's because only they can achieve the high power/weight ratio needed to make use of every straight bit of track installed. Given 46/85/86 are now dead, it's safe to assume it would take a very big stick to use electrification for interstate freight. Hopefully realignment might bypass at least a few of the tunnels and low footbridges enroute.
  LancedDendrite Chief Commissioner

Location: Gheringhap Loop Autonomous Zone
Why would the NSW Government not want the speed to lift.  A more relevant question might be what speed the XPT does through this area considering it is a much heavier train than an EMU would be.
8077
The Canberra service is done with an Xplorer, not an XPT IIRC. The timetable indicates that the Goulburn - Canberra trip takes 1h38m along 104.71 km of track, so that's an average speed of 64 kph. Looks like there's plenty of room for improvement with track re-alignment before even thinking about electrification.

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