First Transcontinental Railroad in North America

 
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
The golden spike is driven at Promontory Summit, Utah, on the First Transcontinental Railroad in North America on May 10th 1869

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  Bulbous Assistant Commissioner

Pretty sure that the bridge from Omaha to Council Bluffs was not completed until 1873 though, so technically there was no continuous rail connection until then. There was a continuous rail connection from coast to coast once the Kansas Pacific Railroad completed the link from Kansas City to Cheyenne in late 1870, three years before the full rail link via the "Transcontinental Route" or what is now the UP Overland Route.
  woodford Chief Commissioner

There's a good book on the construction of the line and all the politics behind it..................

A work of giants; building the first transcontinental railroad [Jan 01, 1962] Griswold, Wesley S

VERY interesting reading................... the whole thing was a serious political and corporate scandal!

woodford
  Big J Deputy Commissioner

Location: In Paradise
There's a good book on the construction of the line and all the politics behind it..................

A work of giants; building the first transcontinental railroad [Jan 01, 1962] Griswold, Wesley S

VERY interesting reading................... the whole thing was a serious political and corporate scandal!

woodford
woodford
I will look out for that as that sounds like a great read.

However, has there ever been a rail line built globally that did not at least involve political influence? Particularly in the 19th Century it was all about land and trying to make a line go through an area. So it was lobbying of one area v another area.

In the modern sense, it is when can a local pollie can get their political spin involved and perversely NIMBY (not in my backyard) seems the major influence.

Look at the current proposed Brisbane to Melbourne line. For ages and continues to be political advocates to influence where the line is to go to, for both servicing an area (NSW) and where it shouldn't go (SE Queensland). I remember the political outcry when this was first mooted 20 years ago peopel were saying that they didnt want coal trains going past them in the Beaudesert area.

So what is new is old and your point is spot on.
  gordon_s1942 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Tablelands of NSW
I doubt any rail project anywhere in the World was free of Politics at any time from inception to completion.
Although the US was mostly built by Private enterprise, licenses, permits and permissions needed had a Political finger in 'The Pie' in some way.
This 'We like Trains but 'Not in MY backyard' syndrome is one reason why a proposal to open the Mudgee Branch between Gulgong and Kandos was howled down by the residents of Mudgee so the proposal withered on the vine as the 'NAY's' far outnumbered the 'YAYS'.

It was around this same time, May of 1869 the Main Western line was 'opened' to Rydal (NSW) to allow regular Passenger and Goods services to operate between there and Sydney.
No official opening was carried out at the time as the line was still being constructed towards Bathurst and Rydal was only a temporary Terminus for next 2 or 3 years with Cobb and Co coaches filling in the gap.

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