Automatic doors on Xtrapolis and Siemens trains

 
  route14 Chief Commissioner

I saw a news photo today that the pedestrian button at a road intersection no longer needed to be pressed.  The system would assume there are pedestrians waiting to cross on every phase.  A question comes into mind, can the doors on Xtrapolis and Siemens trains be programmed so that they all open on release?  It would minimize cross contamination during the COVID 19.

Sponsored advertisement

  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
I saw a news photo today that the pedestrian button at a road intersection no longer needed to be pressed.  The system would assume there are pedestrians waiting to cross on every phase.  A question comes into mind, can the doors on Xtrapolis and Siemens trains be programmed so that they all open on release?  It would minimize cross contamination during the COVID 19.
"route14"

I think majority of Sydney trains still do this but it puts a huge strain on the air-conditioning/heating systems of the train because the carriage gets fully ventilated at every single stop.

If you're paranoid then use a pen or similar object to press the button.
  route14 Chief Commissioner

Of course there are ways around it, but with those two train types the doors open and close both by electric motors.  I wouldn't imagine it too difficult to change the wiring to make the trains safer to use at the moment.
  aussie48 Junior Train Controller

Location: Melbourne
Of course there are ways around it, but with those two train types the doors open and close both by electric motors.  I wouldn't imagine it too difficult to change the wiring to make the trains safer to use at the moment.
route14
The doors are that way so as to keep the carriage either hot or cold and not over work the environmental system.  Do you really think that Public Transport will be running next week?
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Of course there are ways around it, but with those two train types the doors open and close both by electric motors.  I wouldn't imagine it too difficult to change the wiring to make the trains safer to use at the moment.
"route14"

They ARE safe to use, what's so difficult about not using your finger to push a button?
  potatoinmymouth Chief Commissioner

Given half the fleet will still have manual doors it’s a bit of a moot point anyway as far as social distancing measures are concerned.

I did devise a method of opening the Comeng doors with my forearm before I was able to give up on the train altogether, though.

Perhaps it would be an idea, if weekend timetables were implemented, to minimise the number of Comengs in service instead.
  Heihachi_73 Chief Commissioner

Location: Terminating at Ringwood
I think majority of Sydney trains still do this but it puts a huge strain on the air-conditioning/heating systems of the train because the carriage gets fully ventilated at every single stop.

If you're paranoid then use a pen or similar object to press the button.
don_dunstan
That was a major issue with the 4D as well (and B2 trams - probably not an issue with Z/A class as the driver-only AC wouldn't spread that far, although I have cooled an empty A before (as in, 26°C outside, like a fridge inside) using the driver aircon, all windows closed and the interior vents behind each cab pointing to the floor - they're useless if they're pointing straight into the PIDs). The doors opened and closed automatically, but they couldn't close by themselves as there is no way for passengers to open them afterwards due to the lack of door handles. The inter-carriage doors were also automatic, but you had to pull the handle to get them to open (they closed automatically). Also, people could get stuck in the train back in the days of 1-carriage operation in the late 90s when the 4D was used at night (which was extremely rare), as disabling the carriages also disabled the door mechs including the ones between the carriages! Cue panic at Ringwood East one night when exactly that happened after the Lilydale train was boarded at Ringwood followed by the driver killing the lights in the back 3 carriages after the train left the platform! The train didn't become unlocked until Croydon; my guess is either someone on the platform saw the problem, or maybe the people in the lit carriage saw through the door.
  route14 Chief Commissioner

It was really nice that the saloon surveillance cameras and passenger intercoms allowed the one-car operation be withdrawn.
    My suggestion is only for the duration before the COVID 19 is contained.  The virus is vulnerable to heat so it should be gone by summer in southern hemisphere.
  theanimal Chief Commissioner

Of course there are ways around it, but with those two train types the doors open and close both by electric motors.  I wouldn't imagine it too difficult to change the wiring to make the trains safer to use at the moment.
route14
How does it make the train safer?
  hbedriver Assistant Commissioner

The sheer increase in passenger numbers was what really killed off the one-car running. And it became pointless on X'trapolis trains, which kept their emergency saloon lights on even with locked doors on trailing cars; the customers couldn't work that one out (and nor could we!).

Self-closing doors based on timers are great ideas, as they do tend to stop the train trying to use its air-conditioners to lower the external temperatures, and help keep the inside of the trains at the desired temperature. Doors on X'trapolis and Siemens trains (and I assume the new things) open and close using electric motors, so technologically there shouldn't be too much work to configure them to all open when the door release button is activated by the driver.

At this moderate time of year climatically, the air-conditioners will not be overloaded. Not that there are an awful lot of passengers travelling anyway.

Interestingly, the Sydney and Newcastle trams have had the mods made just recently in response to COVID-19.
  route14 Chief Commissioner

At least doors on Siemens trains can be altered to operate the same style as Combino trams because they have infra red detection anyway.  They would all open on release and if no one alights or boards for 10 seconds they would close with the open button available, so passengers that are already ready to alight or board won't have to press the button and those late arrivers would open the doors the same way as today, provided that the train is still laying up at the platform.  Melbourne has long had different train and tram types with different ways of operating the doors so you don't really need to achieve a uniformity between train types.
  Heihachi_73 Chief Commissioner

Location: Terminating at Ringwood
I will mention one thing though, if the Comengs could be retrofitted with door buttons in place of those useless yellow things it would be infinitely better. It's not impossible, given that Adelaide's near-identical 3000 class were converted long ago. It is strange how long it took for us to get fully automatic (or even manually-opened, automatically closing) doors on trains, considering W class trams had them as standard since the late 1930s; our trains never had self-closing doors until the tail end of the Harris fleet in the late 60s, and even then it was only a trial to see how they would work with the new silver trains still on the drawing board. On a side note, the Z1 trams (and successors) had doors based on the latest MMTB bus of the era, the 1975 Leyland National. While the buses were sold off relatively quickly (unlike the B59s and SL200s, and Ventura's Leyland fleet - although the 32 seat limit/union debacle is probably what killed them off), the tram doors remained virtually unchanged into 1994 when B2 2132 left the shops, although IIRC the door mechanisms were changed in the late 80s (A1 and A2 door mechs are apparently different even though the doors themselves are physically identical).
  Lad_Porter Chief Commissioner

Location: Yarra Glen
"W class trams had them as standard since the late 1940s"

According to my dog eared copy of Destination City, the first SW6 (No. 850) was built in 1939.  More followed in the early 40s.
  route14 Chief Commissioner

Ideally running with the doors open (or no doors at all, as what was common with older trams and trains) would be perfect to prevent virus infection as ventilation is essential to achieve so.  Unfortunately such practice is long gone in a society in which paying cost for one's own stupidity is no longer the rule.
  Heihachi_73 Chief Commissioner

Location: Terminating at Ringwood
"W class trams had them as standard since the late 1940s"

According to my dog eared copy of Destination City, the first SW6 (No. 850) was built in 1939.  More followed in the early 40s.
Lad_Porter
Updated post, thanks for the heads-up. Smile

Sponsored advertisement

Subscribers: theanimal

Display from:   

Quick Reply

We've disabled Quick Reply for this thread as it was last updated more than six months ago.