Bacchus Marsh Chicory Kiln

 
Topic moved from News by dthead on 26 Mar 2021 15:45
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line
When leaving Bacchus Marsh on the UP on the left of the train, a strange looking structure in the middle of the Market Garden can be seen on with a faded sign saying 'Dr Morse's Indian Root pills' being directed towards the passengers on the train.

My friends in the Bacchus Marsh Lions Club have secured a government grant to restore this building which has not been used for drying chicory since 1908 and is one of the biggest of the few remaining chicory kilns anywhere in Australia.

Before coffee became common place people used to drink chicory as an alternative to tea.

There may have been other uses for chicory which I am unaware of.

Mike.

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  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland
When leaving Bacchus Marsh on the UP on the left of the train, a strange looking structure in the middle of the Market Garden can be seen on with a faded sign saying Dr Morse's is Indian Root pills being directed towards the passengers on the train.

My friends in the Bacchus Marsh Lions Club have secured a government grant to restore this building which has not been used for drying chicory since 1908 and is one of the biggest of the few remaining chicory kilns anywhere in Australia.

Before coffee became common place people used to drink chicory as an alternative to tea.

There may have been other uses for chicory which I am unaware of.

Mike.
The Vinelander
Philip Island has many Chicory Kilns along with French Island and East Gippsland.
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line
When leaving Bacchus Marsh on the UP on the left of the train, a strange looking structure in the middle of the Market Garden can be seen on with a faded sign saying Dr Morse's is Indian Root pills being directed towards the passengers on the train.

My friends in the Bacchus Marsh Lions Club have secured a government grant to restore this building which has not been used for drying chicory since 1908 and is one of the biggest of the few remaining chicory kilns anywhere in Australia.

Before coffee became common place people used to drink chicory as an alternative to tea.

There may have been other uses for chicory which I am unaware of.

Mike.
Philip Island has many Chicory Kilns along with French Island and East Gippsland.
Nightfire

As I'm currently in east Gippsland, Bruthen to be specific and riding the east Gippsland Rail trail to/from Orbost, please point out where I'll find another of these kilns.

Mike.
  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland

As I'm currently in east Gippsland, Bruthen to be specific and riding the east Gippsland Rail trail to/from Orbost, please point out where I'll find another of these kilns.

Mike.
The Vinelander
There Is a Hop Kiln at Mossiface

I can recall seeing similar In the Snowy and Cann Valley's
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line

As I'm currently in east Gippsland, Bruthen to be specific and riding the east Gippsland Rail trail to/from Orbost, please point out where I'll find another of these kilns.

Mike.
There Is a Hop Kiln at Mossiface

I can recall seeing similar In the Snowy and Cann Valley's
Nightfire

So to clarify, hops and chicory are the same thing Question
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
No; hops and chicory are not the same.

Hops used in brewing are the flower of a climbing plant that's a member of the hemp family. They grow on bines (not vines) that can reach more than five metres tall. The hop flowers contain lupulin, a sticky substance that contains essential oils, bitter acids and resins, and that is released when boiled.

Chicory is a flowering plant in the dandelion family that is characterized by a tough, hairy stem, light purple flowers and leaves that are commonly used in salads. Chicory tastes similar to coffee but has a flavour that's often described as slightly woody and nutty.

Chicory was actually used as a substitute for coffee rather than tea. This usage was very common when I was a kid after the Second War, and coffee was scarce. Any grocer's shop would have bottles of both Coffee Essence and Coffee and Chicory.

Drying kilns are commonly referred to as Oast Houses, and, as Nightfire has indicated, Philip Island used to be littered with them. Some still remain. I can't be sure of the whereabouts on any in Gippsland, but the Ovens Valley are also had many Oast Houses. These were used for drying tobacco which is/was a common crop in that area.
  GoldenGirl Locomotive Driver


As I'm currently in east Gippsland, Bruthen to be specific and riding the east Gippsland Rail trail to/from Orbost, please point out where I'll find another of these kilns.

Mike.There Is a Hop Kiln at Mossiface

I can recall seeing similar In the Snowy and Cann Valley's
So to clarify, hops and chicory are the same thing Question
The Vinelander
No, they are not, but I cannot recall seeing hickory kilns other than those on Phillip Island. And many of those have now gone. You used to be able to buy a coffee & chickory essence (liquid) in a tall thin square bottle when I was younger. This was before the advent of dried coffee powder. As I recall, it had a image on the front of the lable of a black person, that would probably be considered offensive these days.
  GoldenGirl Locomotive Driver


As I'm currently in east Gippsland, Bruthen to be specific and riding the east Gippsland Rail trail to/from Orbost, please point out where I'll find another of these kilns.

Mike.There Is a Hop Kiln at Mossiface

I can recall seeing similar In the Snowy and Cann Valley's
So to clarify, hops and chicory are the same thing Confused:No, they are not, but I cannot recall seeing hickory kilns other than those on Phillip Island. And many of those have now gone. You used to be able to buy a coffee & chickory essence (liquid) in a tall thin square bottle when I was younger. This was before the advent of dried coffee powder. As I recall, it had a image on the front of the label of a black person, that would probably be considered offensive these days.
GoldenGirl
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line
No; hops and chicory are not the same.

Chicory is a flowering plant in the dandelion family that is characterized by a tough, hairy stem, light purple flowers and leaves that are commonly used in salads. Chicory tastes similar to coffee but has a flavour that's often described as slightly woody and nutty.
Valvegear

This is interesting because along the rail trail I've been observing plants very similar to what you describe which appear to have hairy stems and a light purple flower.

When I leave Bruthen this morning with the knowledge you provided, I'll stop and look at the first one I come across.

It's a beautiful autumnal morning for a 30km ride to Nowa Nowa.

Mike.
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line
And many of those have now gone. You used to be able to buy a coffee & chickory essence (liquid) in a tall thin square bottle when I was younger. This was before the advent of dried coffee powder. As I recall, it had a image on the front of the label of a black person, that would probably be considered offensive these days.
GoldenGirl

Yes, I believe it was Bushell's Coffee and Chicory essence. It was widely available until perhaps the late 1980's and if I recall, the figure on the label was wearing a turban.

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=bushells+coffee+and+chicory+essence&hl=en&tbm=isch&sxsrf=ALeKk02VjQaQAoMco4Jvlwnfocc0qbIGsw%3A1616708093269&source=hp&biw=1053&bih=568&ei=_QFdYJLBDs7B3LUPm9O0yAM&oq=bushells+coffee+&gs_lcp=CgNpbWcQARgDMgIIADICCAAyAggAMgIIADIECAAQHjIGCAAQBRAeMgYIABAFEB4yBggAEAgQHjIGCAAQCBAeMgYIABAIEB46BAgjECc6BQgAELEDOggIABCxAxCDAVCRAlivIWDrM2gAcAB4A4AB6AaIAa0xkgELMi03LjIuMi4xLjOYAQCgAQGqAQtnd3Mtd2l6LWltZw&sclient=img#imgrc=mrzfHLpHqo1UaM

Not offensive to me, just advertising from a bygone era...like Dr Morse's Indian Root Pills...

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=dr+morse%27s+indian+root+pills&tbm=isch&ved=2ahUKEwjtramBs8zvAhVSSCsKHX6YCWsQ2-cCegQIABAA&oq=dr+morse&gs_lcp=CgNpbWcQARgBMgIIADICCAAyAggAMgIIADICCAAyAggAMgIIADICCAAyAggAMgIIADoFCAAQsQM6CAgAELEDEIMBOgQIABBDOgcIABCxAxBDUOfFBViq2AVg--0FaABwAHgAgAHUA4gBxxSSAQcyLTUuMC4zmAEAoAEBqgELZ3dzLXdpei1pbWfAAQE&sclient=img&ei=BgJdYO2SKdKQrQH-sKbYBg&bih=568&biw=1053&hl=en#imgrc=SLVpI54Q9ItKDM


Mike.
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka

As I'm currently in east Gippsland, Bruthen to be specific and riding the east Gippsland Rail trail to/from Orbost, please point out where I'll find another of these kilns.

Mike.There Is a Hop Kiln at Mossiface

I can recall seeing similar In the Snowy and Cann Valley's
So to clarify, hops and chicory are the same thing Confused:No, they are not, but I cannot recall seeing hickory kilns other than those on Phillip Island. And many of those have now gone. You used to be able to buy a coffee & chickory essence (liquid) in a tall thin square bottle when I was younger. This was before the advent of dried coffee powder. As I recall, it had a image on the front of the lable of a black person, that would probably be considered offensive these days.
GoldenGirl
You can still buy it, Bushells  Coffee&Chicory Essence. Comes in a thin 20 cm bottle with a blue and tannish red label. I have it as a topping on ice cream, or in a thick shake. Don't need much, pretty concentrated, no one else in the house goes for it but I love it.  Introduced to it by my old dears as a wee tacker.
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
Ooops missed your post Mike, its still got the bloke with the hat thing on his noggin. Dunno if it's a turbin.
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
That's the one, first picture in your first link
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
No; hops and chicory are not the same.

Chicory is a flowering plant in the dandelion family that is characterized by a tough, hairy stem, light purple flowers and leaves that are commonly used in salads. Chicory tastes similar to coffee but has a flavour that's often described as slightly woody and nutty.

This is interesting because along the rail trail I've been observing plants very similar to what you describe which appear to have hairy stems and a light purple flower.

When I leave Bruthen this morning with the knowledge you provided, I'll stop and look at the first one I come across.

It's a beautiful autumnal morning for a 30km ride to Nowa Nowa.

Mike.
The Vinelander
Hope that you are not using that electric thingy on the bike.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
No; hops and chicory are not the same.

Chicory is a flowering plant in the dandelion family that is characterized by a tough, hairy stem, light purple flowers and leaves that are commonly used in salads. Chicory tastes similar to coffee but has a flavour that's often described as slightly woody and nutty.

This is interesting because along the rail trail I've been observing plants very similar to what you describe which appear to have hairy stems and a light purple flower.

When I leave Bruthen this morning with the knowledge you provided, I'll stop and look at the first one I come across.

It's a beautiful autumnal morning for a 30km ride to Nowa Nowa.

Mike.
Hope that you are not using that electric thingy on the bike.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
Hope that you are not using that electric thingy on the bike.
"YM-Mundrabilla"
Sounds a bit questionable.
  hbedriver Assistant Commissioner

Hope The Vinelander enjoys his tour. Doubtless he will appreciate that the second half of that section is essentially downhill. Apart from the detour around the Stony Creek trestle bridge; now that really would be a fantastic part of any rail trail.

I think the kilns around Mossiface could be seen between the railway and the Johnsonville - Bruthen road, although whether they survived the fires last year I don't know.

More importantly, how did the overall ride go? Trail condition, etc?
  Lockspike Chief Commissioner

Ooops missed your post Mike, its still got the bloke with the hat thing on his noggin. Dunno if it's a turbin.
wobert
I seem to recall it being a fez (hat).
  wobert Chief Commissioner

Location: Half way between Propodolla and Kinimakatka
Ooops missed your post Mike, its still got the bloke with the hat thing on his noggin. Dunno if it's a turbin.
I seem to recall it being a fez (hat).
Lockspike
That rings a bell
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line
No; hops and chicory are not the same.

Chicory is a flowering plant in the dandelion family that is characterized by a tough, hairy stem, light purple flowers and leaves that are commonly used in salads. Chicory tastes similar to coffee but has a flavour that's often described as slightly woody and nutty.

This is interesting because along the rail trail I've been observing plants very similar to what you describe which appear to have hairy stems and a light purple flower.

When I leave Bruthen this morning with the knowledge you provided, I'll stop and look at the first one I come across.

It's a beautiful autumnal morning for a 30km ride to Nowa Nowa.

Mike.
Hope that you are not using that electric thingy on the bike.
YM-Mundrabilla

What electric thingy...oh you mean my E-Bike, shamelessly plugged below. Smile

https://leitner.com.au/collections/electric-bikes/products/electric-folding-bike-dual-suspension-leitner-supert?variant=29461758771282

Add a couple of saddle bags to the rack, the charger, work laptop computer and the 120km rail trail is a breeze.

Now back to the thread.

Mike.
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line
Hope The Vinelander enjoys his tour. Doubtless he will appreciate that the second half of that section is essentially downhill. Apart from the detour around the Stony Creek trestle bridge; now that really would be a fantastic part of any rail trail.

I think the kilns around Mossiface could be seen between the railway and the Johnsonville - Bruthen road, although whether they survived the fires last year I don't know.

More importantly, how did the overall ride go? Trail condition, etc?
hbedriver

Ok one more comment before the thread, bearing in mind I'm no lightweight and I'm almost 66 yo.

Last Saturday I trained it from Ballan to Bairnsdale. Next day, rode down to Paynesville and back to Bairnsdale.
Next day rode to Bruthen along the trail, looking at the earlier described purple flowers and stayed at the pub. The next day, the day the rains came I caught the bus, with bike folded underneath to Swifts Creek.
The next day, via Cassilis and that super steep range that tested me and the bike to Omeo. Next day,(yesterday) bus back to Bruthen.
Today, with absolutely NO purple flowers along the way to check over, to Nowa Nowa for two nights.
Then to Orbost for three nights and a ride to Marlo, then to Nowa Nowa where I'll probably throw in the towel and catch the V/Line bus back to Bairnsdale thence to Ballan.

The rail trail is in good shape but not much info about the former stations except at Bruthen, the trestle bridge and at Nowa Nowa, which is a tiny town with no food available after 5pm.

The bike has performed amazingly well, charged up each night and hasn't run out of juice even on the steep climb from Cassilis.

Mike.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Hop ‘flowers’ are light green and almost resemble an unopened pine cone.

They almost always smell and taste better as a ‘tea’ and when raw if you smell then they can be quite ‘pungent’ in a bad way.

They sort of look like a grape vine, but are grown either straight up vertically, or intensively in commercial setting two stems on a single wire each, inclined to about 30% from vertical and to a height of about 9-12 feet, so they look like a tall V shaped plant.
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line
Update on my working holiday. Arrived at Orbost yesterday after a leisurely ride over about 4 hours and 40Km from Nowa Nowa where I spent two nights.

Nowa Nowa has an extensive mountain bike trail through the forest which is a magnificent ride away from all roads.

The arrival in Orbost is grand with views across the Snowy River flood plain to the now decomissioned railway trestle bridge, the longest in Victoria.



https://youtu.be/F66ir2hmCmM

Now the Andrews government has allocated $3.5 million towards restoration, the future looks bright for this sector of tourism in east Gippsland.

I'll post more on the chicory kiln as the funding is confirmed.

Mike.

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