UGL to be awarded $1.5BN Country Regional Network contract

 
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
CIMIC's UGL to be awarded $1.5BN Country Regional Network contract

CIMIC Group’s UGL has been confirmed by Transport for New South Wales (TfNSW) as the successful bidder for the operation and maintenance of rail infrastructure for the Country Regional Network.
The 10-year agreement is expected to generate revenue to UGL in excess of $1.5 billion.
The contract includes:

  • network operations, including establishment of a new network control centre in regional NSW;
  • rail infrastructure maintenance and implementation of a new signalling system - UGL’s proprietary system, Sigview;
  • asset and property management; and
  • safety, access, performance, and environmental management.
CIMIC Group Executive Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Juan Santamaria said: “The Country Regional Network provides a reliable and sustainable rail network to safely transport passengers and goods across regional NSW. CIMIC and UGL are proud to support TfNSW to keep this essential service running across more than 2,300 kilometres of rail and we’re pleased to do so with a strong commitment to indigenous and regional employment.”

UGL Managing Director Doug Moss said: “This contract win solidifies UGL as the leading rail services company in Australia, by building on our extensive work across the NSW rail network and complementing the rail projects we manage in all other states and territories. We look forward to working with TfNSW on the safe and successful transition of the Country Regional Network contract over the coming months.”

Mobilisation will begin in early 2021 with UGL commencing operations in January 2022.

https://www.cimic.com.au/en/news-and-media/latest-news/ugl/2021/ugl-to-be-awarded-country-regional-network-contract?fbclid=IwAR0M30YPVsC5kvThwJsRqqpN1xrr7eel0P0F6j8oHQosWjC1yKJu4IOpjgc

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  Jack Le Lievre Assistant Commissioner

Location: Moolap Station, Vic
I wonder why the move away from John Holland?
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
I wonder why the move away from John Holland?
Jack Le Lievre

By the time UGL takeover JH will have had the contract for 10 years. The new contract with UGL will be for 10 years. So in theory it's just a case of competition and making sure you have the best deal by putting the contract out to tender now and again.

Anecdotally I've heard there were aspects of the current arrangement the NSW government was not 100% happy with.
  SinickleBird Assistant Commissioner

Location: Qantas Club at Mudgee International Airport
Interestingly, local media are reporting that UGL’s control centre will be located in Orange, rather than Broadmeadow (where JH train control is based).

With ARTC operating out of Broadmeadow, I can see the benefits of co-location. On the other hand, Orange is geographically central within the state and, thanks to modern telecommunications, should be quite practical.

Perhaps job creation in central west was a factor in the decision. On the other hand, I don’t think there are many qualified train controllers in these parts. Probably need to re-employ and relocate existing skilled people.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Interestingly, local media are reporting that UGL’s control centre will be located in Orange, rather than Broadmeadow (where JH train control is based).
SinickleBird

Some further info arrived https://www.railpage.com.au/news/s/ugls-rail-contract-amazing-news-for-orange
  james.au Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney, NSW
Interestingly, local media are reporting that UGL’s control centre will be located in Orange,
SinickleBird
Where is the Minister for Regional Transport's electorate?  And which electorate do they want to take back from the SFF party??
  JovialOne Beginner

https://www.transport.nsw.gov.au/news-and-events/media-releases/new-deal-underpins-strong-future-for-country-regional-network

It looks as it they wanted to move the control centre from Newcastle to Orange to fill the regional jobs requirement.  Isn't everything outside Sydney "regional" ? Smile

If they implement Sigview across the train order lines of CRN (non-CTC) without the existing electronic train orders, how is the likely to impact train operations and running times?  Would they go back to voice orders?

Note - I don't work for UGL, just interested in the technology.
  NSWGR8022 Chief Commissioner

Location: From the lands of Journalism and Free Speech
Andrew Constance is the member for Bega a long way from Orange.
  JovialOne Beginner

The Minister for Regional Transport and Roads is Paul Toole, Member for Bathurst and Deputy Leader of the Nationals.
  NSWGR8022 Chief Commissioner

Location: From the lands of Journalism and Free Speech
The Minister for Regional Transport and Roads is Paul Toole, Member for Bathurst and Deputy Leader of the Nationals.
JovialOne

Appreciate the correct as I was not aware the role was split.
  barryc Chief Train Controller

Location: Waiting for a train to Canungra
What do they actually do, though, apart from maintenance?

As far as I can see the only regular trains on the CRN lines are passengers to Dubbo (Daily) and Broken Hill (once a week), Moree and
Armidale (Daily), Griffith (some days) and Canberra (a few times a day) plus their returns. Regular freight consists of Cobar ore and what else?

Easy jobs for train controllers.

Indian Pacific some days?
  SinickleBird Assistant Commissioner

Location: Qantas Club at Mudgee International Airport
You would be surprised how many movements occur on the CRN.

https://jhrcrn.com.au/what-we-do/network-operations-access/standard-working-timetable-swtt/

This is without ad-hoc trains (grain, heritage, maintenance)
  james.au Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney, NSW
You would be surprised how many movements occur on the CRN.

https://jhrcrn.com.au/what-we-do/network-operations-access/standard-working-timetable-swtt/

This is without ad-hoc trains (grain, heritage, maintenance)
SinickleBird
Still, the marginal effort for train control handled by the CRN controllers would no doubt be able to be handled by a common control centre that does the DIRN and possibly other country SG lines (eg in Victoria, SA) for cheaper than what it would cost to have separate control centres all round.

This isnt just in terms of the controllers, but in terms of TOC manuals, interface agreements, rollingstock registration and compliance, and a long list of things that are just unnecessarily duplicated across sub-components of the network.
  james.au Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney, NSW
I just want to put this here

https://www.austlogistics.com.au/policy-advocacy/nationaloperatingstandard/

ALC is advocating for a National Operating Standard for the road sector.  This would standardise so much of the sector and streamline how it works.

Road is doing it.  Rail is sitting on its hands.
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
I just want to put this here

https://www.austlogistics.com.au/policy-advocacy/nationaloperatingstandard/

ALC is advocating for a National Operating Standard for the road sector.  This would standardise so much of the sector and streamline how it works.

Road is doing it.  Rail is sitting on its hands.
james.au

I'm surprised at your stock standard RP view here James, that 'rail' is to blame.

About a decade ago rail tried everything to standardise across the industry but was thwarted at every turn by the state governments (which continues to this day) and lack of spine from the feds to bring the states into line.

Much the same could be said about your preceding post about control centres. The states and feds brought in competition policy (which was never intended to apply to the rail industry) and separation of above and below rail which ahs led to the current situation.

I think people would be surprised at the amount of traffic on the CRN, but it suits the current RP anti-rail narrative to downplay it.
  Throughwestmail Train Controller

Interestingly, local media are reporting that UGL’s control centre will be located in Orange, rather than Broadmeadow (where JH train control is based).

With ARTC operating out of Broadmeadow, I can see the benefits of co-location. On the other hand, Orange is geographically central within the state and, thanks to modern telecommunications, should be quite practical.

Perhaps job creation in central west was a factor in the decision. On the other hand, I don’t think there are many qualified train controllers in these parts. Probably need to re-employ and relocate existing skilled people.
SinickleBird
What are the benefits of co-location? ARTC Broadmeadow is actually right next door to Sydney Trains Broadmeadow Signal Box, John Holland CRN control centre is in the shops at Mayfield West.
  Throughwestmail Train Controller

What do they actually do, though, apart from maintenance?

As far as I can see the only regular trains on the CRN lines are passengers to Dubbo (Daily) and Broken Hill (once a week), Moree and
Armidale (Daily), Griffith (some days) and Canberra (a few times a day) plus their returns. Regular freight consists of Cobar ore and what else?

Easy jobs for train controllers.

Indian Pacific some days?
barryc
What is your experience as a Network Controller. The big difference between a Train Controller and a Network Controller is that a Train Controller does not do any signalling, they have signallers/area controllers to do that, while a Network Controller does everything, with no middle man to ask questions about decisions made. ARTC/JHCRN/UGL are Network controllers, and not only do they run the trains, they also are responsible for all trackwork. Not as easy as it appears.
  Throughwestmail Train Controller

You would be surprised how many movements occur on the CRN.

https://jhrcrn.com.au/what-we-do/network-operations-access/standard-working-timetable-swtt/

This is without ad-hoc trains (grain, heritage, maintenance)
Still, the marginal effort for train control handled by the CRN controllers would no doubt be able to be handled by a common control centre that does the DIRN and possibly other country SG lines (eg in Victoria, SA) for cheaper than what it would cost to have separate control centres all round.

This isnt just in terms of the controllers, but in terms of TOC manuals, interface agreements, rollingstock registration and compliance, and a long list of things that are just unnecessarily duplicated across sub-components of the network.
james.au
Didn't ARTC have the CRN taken off them 10 years ago? Sydney Trains /CRN/ARTC in NSW have , with a couple of exceptions, exactly the same TOC manuals, Rules and Regulations. For example the rule for walking in the danger zone is NGE 200(Sydney Trains), CNGE 200 (CRN) and ANGE 200 (ARTC).
  Junction box Chief Commissioner

Location: newy
Thats a lot of money to spend on the train control function when there is a system in place that works.
  Throughwestmail Train Controller

Thats a lot of money to spend on the train control function when there is a system in place that works.
Junction box
That money is not only on train control functions, but also all maintenance and upkeep of the track ,and they also have the responsibility for all stations and locations under their control, and all real estate functions. As you can see, there is a lot more than just train control.
  simstrain Chief Commissioner

Interestingly, local media are reporting that UGL’s control centre will be located in Orange,
Where is the Minister for Regional Transport's electorate?  And which electorate do they want to take back from the SFF party??
james.au

Libs are highly unlikely to achieve this and the nationals will be lucky to retain some of their own seats in these areas. Mainly due to the water rights issue.
  BBattarbee Station Staff

Location: Morphett Vale
Will this produce an opportunity to upgrade the sections of the track that have the light rail?

With the upgrade of the Port Augusta to Tarcoola line to 60Kg rail, there must be oodles of good quality second hand 53kg rail about.
  M636C Minister for Railways

Will this produce an opportunity to upgrade the sections of the track that have the light rail?

With the upgrade of the Port Augusta to Tarcoola line to 60Kg rail, there must be oodles of good quality second hand 53kg rail about.
BBattarbee

I was under the impression that 53kg/m was largely confined to NSW until fairly recently.

Certainly 47kg/m was the standard to which the major standardisation construction was carried out from 1960 to 1970.

WAGR found that they had to upgrade from 47kg/m to 53kg/m or 60kg/m owing to the track damage caused by the Koolyanobbing iron ore traffic, initially to Kwinana.

I think Tarcoola to Alice Springs was partly built using 60kg/m but a lot of 40kg/m and some even lighter rail was used.

Even in NSW, just west of Gunning station where the ceremoninal gold painted millionth concrete sleeper was laid, the rail was 50kg/m dating to 1931 and that is still there.

I'd be surprised if there was a lot of spare 53kg/m rail even after the scheduled relaying.

Peter
  Lockspike Chief Commissioner

Will this produce an opportunity to upgrade the sections of the track that have the light rail?

With the upgrade of the Port Augusta to Tarcoola line to 60Kg rail, there must be oodles of good quality second hand 53kg rail about.
Even in NSW, just west of Gunning station where the ceremoninal gold painted millionth concrete sleeper was laid, the rail was 50kg/m dating to 1931 and that is still there.

I'd be surprised if there was a lot of spare 53kg/m rail even after the scheduled relaying.

Peter
M636C
Ah,yes, the old 100lb rail. The little known 103lb was a later development prior to the 107lb being introduced.

Assuming it's still got a usable head and no known tendency to defects, 107lb rail is fine for light duty use. A lot of it is of such an age now that it would not be a wise decision to recycle it to another main line.

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