The Folly of High Speed Rail in NSW

 
  ExtremeCommuter Locomotive Fireman

Home address is a little more difficult and complicated to lie about due to issues like identification checks and tax file declaration.
target is to get the job .. and get to the interview where you resolve issues ..
viaprojects
Kind of difficult to get to the interview when your application has been automatically thrown out via the software before you get the change to say "I commute on the high speed train". Does that make sense? hoping we don't need to debate this anymore lol.

I would love to see high speed rail just as much as the next person, but unfortunately in Australia we have a pretty unique situation that HSR just won't fit the bill,
Newcastle being our second largest city in NSW and only 118km from Sydney, would be the logical destination for our first theoretical high speed rail line, and people are always quick to point out that Australia is one of the few countries without HSR, but we need to look at a few things:

-these other countries often link two (or more) well established cities, Sydney is well established obviously, but Newcastle is a mess, public transport is awful (I'll explain more) and it's completely unliveable for those who are not healthy and wealthy.

-cities that are linked by HSR have good public transport and walkability on both ends, Newcastle is a mess with some of the worst public transport in the country, if anything of interest is next to the rail corridor, that guarantees both no station and pedestrian access. Even if a HSR train could get me to Newcastle in an hour, I would still drive there (and I like trains) because getting from one part of Newcastle to another on local transport would take 1.5 hours.

-the government says HSR will give people more choice in where they live, but if they themselves won't even hire an intercity commuter, and when the cost of living in Newcastle is equivalent or worse than that of Sydney when you factor in things like needing additional cars, paying for private non-bulkbilling GP's, and less small businesses offering cheaper goods and services.

Fix these issues, for example, in the short-term, give Newcastle a proper public transport network, improve development with walkability and housing variety (a unit in Newcastle should logically be cheaper than a unit in Sydney) to improve affordability, and design suburbs to support small businesses,
and then and only then, maybe in the long-term we could see a viable HSR route.

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  route14 Chief Commissioner

Different employers might have different criteria.  For Transport NSW they now ask "target questions" in the online application that used to be asked during the interview.  Unfortunately the "confirm not robot" function doesn't work where I am (China) so I "remote controlled" my Melbourne sister to do it.  However she started doing it the last hour before expiry and there were "target questions" that she had to make random selections, without which the application won't even get sent.
  viaprojects Assistant Commissioner

-cities that are linked by HSR have good public transport and walkability on both ends, Newcastle is a mess with some of the worst public transport in the country, if anything of interest is next to the rail corridor, that guarantees both no station and pedestrian access. Even if a HSR train could get me to Newcastle in an hour, I would still drive there (and I like trains) because getting from one part of Newcastle to another on local transport would take 1.5 hours.

ExtremeCommuter


um Newcastle is not Newcastle ..would not do the hsr to the old Newcastle station as it's no mans land .. the area does have a limited rail options as it the main rail line, but the government is not going to build a rail network linking the main centres to the main line ..
  arctic Deputy Commissioner

Location: Zurich
Home address is a little more difficult and complicated to lie about due to issues like identification checks and tax file declaration.
target is to get the job .. and get to the interview where you resolve issues ..
Kind of difficult to get to the interview when your application has been automatically thrown out via the software before you get the change to say "I commute on the high speed train". Does that make sense? hoping we don't need to debate this anymore lol.

I would love to see high speed rail just as much as the next person, but unfortunately in Australia we have a pretty unique situation that HSR just won't fit the bill,
Newcastle being our second largest city in NSW and only 118km from Sydney, would be the logical destination for our first theoretical high speed rail line, and people are always quick to point out that Australia is one of the few countries without HSR, but we need to look at a few things:

-these other countries often link two (or more) well established cities, Sydney is well established obviously, but Newcastle is a mess, public transport is awful (I'll explain more) and it's completely unliveable for those who are not healthy and wealthy.

-cities that are linked by HSR have good public transport and walkability on both ends, Newcastle is a mess with some of the worst public transport in the country, if anything of interest is next to the rail corridor, that guarantees both no station and pedestrian access. Even if a HSR train could get me to Newcastle in an hour, I would still drive there (and I like trains) because getting from one part of Newcastle to another on local transport would take 1.5 hours.

-the government says HSR will give people more choice in where they live, but if they themselves won't even hire an intercity commuter, and when the cost of living in Newcastle is equivalent or worse than that of Sydney when you factor in things like needing additional cars, paying for private non-bulkbilling GP's, and less small businesses offering cheaper goods and services.

Fix these issues, for example, in the short-term, give Newcastle a proper public transport network, improve development with walkability and housing variety (a unit in Newcastle should logically be cheaper than a unit in Sydney) to improve affordability, and design suburbs to support small businesses,
and then and only then, maybe in the long-term we could see a viable HSR route.
ExtremeCommuter
You keep repeating this thing about "automatic rejection". In my 30 or so years of being on both sides of the interview table I have never ever seen it. In fact I have employed "remote people" and been employed as a "remote person". So I dont really know what you are talking about. Maybe in some industries where there are huge numbers of applicants for a small number of lower skilled jobs.

In fact, my current job in CH I applied for from Sydney. I dont commute of course...Smile
  Totoro Junior Train Controller

@arctic

I agree, this seems like a totally fictional claim. Certainly in the public sector (I work at a hospital), we do NOT reject applications based on an applicant’s address. It all comes down to the applicants’ skills and how they’re presented in their application.

There are many good reasons to question the viability of HSR along the eastern seaboard, but this is not one of them.
  ExtremeCommuter Locomotive Fireman

@route14

Things like commute time and car ownership are not necessarily ‘criteria’ so to speak, however they are commonly used as filters to sift through large numbers of applicants,

For example these are 5 positions, and 10 applicants, all equally meet the employment criteria, but 5 live in Sydney and the other 5 commute from further out.

I remember looking at Transport for NSW years ago, and they basically said in the event they had a large amount of applicants who met criteria, priority will be given to those with shorter commutes (30 minutes I believe).

———-

@viaprojects

Not taking about the old Newcastle station, when I say Newcastle I’m taking about the city in general, hope that can clear some things up.

The government wouldn’t actually need to build a rail network linking places to the main line.
the main line itself as plenty of potential, and local services somewhat already run,
the issues comes from awful frequency, poor bus connections, no pedestrian access to stations, and most notably, anything of interest near the railway line both guarantee there won’t be a station there.

But even the government has no interest in fixing this relatively simple issue,
even with the white elephant light rail, I remember reading that it probably won’t be extended because of low public transport use in the area,
by the same logic I guess there is no point installing a lift at Como Station because of the low number of wheelchair uses which currently use the station…

———

@arctic

Yes it’s rather common in jobs with large number of applicants due to high rates of youth unemployment,
and if people can’t even get into those low-skilled jobs, how are they going to finance themselves through university to get into skilled work.
the course might be payable through VET-fee, but they have to eat somehow, and Centrelink pays bugger-all.

You’ve been established for 30 years, but times have changed, and starting from scratc is much harder thanks to the internet becoming involved with job applications combined with high levels of youth unemployment,

HSR would serve people like you well, but when your generation retires, it would become a white elephant,
it wouldn’t help people in Newcastle access employment in Sydney to reasons explained, nor would it help people like myself in Sydney access Newcastle for any reason (because even if the intercity HSR trip takes only an hour, getting around Newcastle on local public transport can take 1.5 hours, meaning I would have to drive up there regardless of how fast the train went).

———-

@all

Merry Christmas to you all ????
  arctic Deputy Commissioner

Location: Zurich
@arctic

Yes it’s rather common in jobs with large number of applicants due to high rates of youth unemployment,
and if people can’t even get into those low-skilled jobs, how are they going to finance themselves through university to get into skilled work.
the course might be payable through VET-fee, but they have to eat somehow, and Centrelink pays bugger-all.

You’ve been established for 30 years, but times have changed, and starting from scratc is much harder thanks to the internet becoming involved with job applications combined with high levels of youth unemployment,

HSR would serve people like you well, but when your generation retires, it would become a white elephant,
it wouldn’t help people in Newcastle access employment in Sydney to reasons explained, nor would it help people like myself in Sydney access Newcastle for any reason (because even if the intercity HSR trip takes only an hour, getting around Newcastle on local public transport can take 1.5 hours, meaning I would have to drive up there regardless of how fast the train went).

ExtremeCommuter
I guess you missed the point where I was giving actual experience from the Employer side. Again never seen this from the employer side. What I have seen was consideration of ease of access to the location which means even "in city" locations are seen as difficult due to lack of transport options. Whereas someone coming from a long way out but with good transport links may have an easier time. Never a criteria though, just a discussion.

In the circumstance if there were an "HSR" in place this would be accounted for in ease of access..not purely distance..even a computer program were it to be used could be programmed this way.

As for me, when I left Sydney not too long ago to take up my role elsewhere, my replacement was not sorted on who was closest but on who was qualified. This has to be the way for skilled and semi skilled.

I accept for unskilled jobs with many applicants they could do it the way you suggest, but it is for sure not an all encompassing or even common practice in my view and to link it to a reason not to do HSR does not seem reasonable.

Lotsa reasons not to do HSR or any serious rail upgrades as demonstrated by successive givernments, this does not seem like a good one.

Cheers
  ExtremeCommuter Locomotive Fireman

I guess you missed the point where I was giving actual experience from the Employer side. Again never seen this from the employer side. What I have seen was consideration of ease of access to the location which means even "in city" locations are seen as difficult due to lack of transport options. Whereas someone coming from a long way out but with good transport links may have an easier time. Never a criteria though, just a discussion.

In the circumstance if there were an "HSR" in place this would be accounted for in ease of access..not purely distance..even a computer program were it to be used could be programmed this way.

As for me, when I left Sydney not too long ago to take up my role elsewhere, my replacement was not sorted on who was closest but on who was qualified. This has to be the way for skilled and semi skilled.

I accept for unskilled jobs with many applicants they could do it the way you suggest, but it is for sure not an all encompassing or even common practice in my view and to link it to a reason not to do HSR does not seem reasonable.

Lotsa reasons not to do HSR or any serious rail upgrades as demonstrated by successive givernments, this does not seem like a good one.

Cheers
arctic
Sorry it took me a while to get back to you - busy Christmas, hope you and everyone here had a good one also.

On to the point, I didn't miss your point about experience and appreciate you sharing it, but what I was trying to point out is how this directly impacts future generations, I have already acknowledged how HSR will benefit established people such as yourself, but would ultimately become a white elephant when your generation retires.

When it comes to future generations, there are simply too many applicants for entry-level jobs that I can't really see an employer re-writing their filtering software to factor in HSR when they can't deal with the amount of applicants as it is.

The reason HSR is unreasonable is because Transport for NSW believes it will give people choice in where they live, this is only true for the current generation, but not for future generations, and if one can't get that unskilled entry level job, how can they every progress to a better job? (fund themselves through University for example, yes VET-Fee exists, but they have to eat don't they?

If Transport for NSW stated they simply wanted HSR to link cities faster, even if it would be a waste of money and still wouldn't help me get to Newcastle any faster due to horrid local transport, then at least HSR would be doing what they indented for it to do.

Cheers
  viaprojects Assistant Commissioner

would ultimately become a white elephant when your generation retires.

ExtremeCommuter


alot of white elephants around sydney the big ones are the toll roads where the operators makes a profit ...not the state ..
  Travelling Hooker Locomotive Driver

Location: Follows the weather up and down the coast
There's definitely an election coming up.

Anthony Albanese is speaking in Newcastle today (Sunday) where he'll promote the pie in the sky HSR idea between NTL and SYD.

The story is in The Australian this morning, behind a paywall, but says:

In a draft of the speech to be delivered in Newcastle, Mr Albanese said that a downpayment of $500 million would be made by Labor in its first budget to acquire the corridor. He said a new High-Speed Rail Authority would make the Sydney to Newcastle line its key priority.

“If I’m elected prime minister, I want ours to be the first government that actually gets work underway on high-speed rail,” he said. “My vision is for high-speed rail that runs from Brisbane to Melbourne"

“Faster rail would see travel times from Newcastle to Sydney cut to just two hours. And once high-speed rail is up and running, this journey would take only 45 minutes. You’ll be able to jump on the train at 6:30pm and be at Sydney Olympic Park for the start of the [NRL] Knights game,” he said.

The east coast HSR concept has been kicked around since I was a boy. It's never gone anywhere beyond being a gravy train for the consulting industry and bureaucrats who prepare the reports/studies/papers/reviews.

Unfortunately, HSR is cost-prohibitive and getting more so every year. A more cost-effective solution might be to sort the issues in the existing line - the bottlenecks on the suburban section, the all over the shop curves between Cowan and Gosford, etc. I have no idea how best to do this but the existing speedy Geelong - Melbourne line might be a more realistic model/option than HSR.

In the meantime, politicians like Albanese insult the intelligence of us all by flogging this dead horse at every election and expecting punters to buy it and them seriously.
  michaelgm Chief Commissioner

There's definitely an election coming up.

Anthony Albanese is speaking in Newcastle today (Sunday) where he'll promote the pie in the sky HSR idea between NTL and SYD.

The story is in The Australian this morning, behind a paywall, but says:

In a draft of the speech to be delivered in Newcastle, Mr Albanese said that a downpayment of $500 million would be made by Labor in its first budget to acquire the corridor. He said a new High-Speed Rail Authority would make the Sydney to Newcastle line its key priority.

“If I’m elected prime minister, I want ours to be the first government that actually gets work underway on high-speed rail,” he said. “My vision is for high-speed rail that runs from Brisbane to Melbourne"

“Faster rail would see travel times from Newcastle to Sydney cut to just two hours. And once high-speed rail is up and running, this journey would take only 45 minutes. You’ll be able to jump on the train at 6:30pm and be at Sydney Olympic Park for the start of the [NRL] Knights game,” he said.

The east coast HSR concept has been kicked around since I was a boy. It's never gone anywhere beyond being a gravy train for the consulting industry and bureaucrats who prepare the reports/studies/papers/reviews.

Unfortunately, HSR is cost-prohibitive and getting more so every year. A more cost-effective solution might be to sort the issues in the existing line - the bottlenecks on the suburban section, the all over the shop curves between Cowan and Gosford, etc. I have no idea how best to do this but the existing speedy Geelong - Melbourne line might be a more realistic model/option than HSR.

In the meantime, politicians like Albanese insult the intelligence of us all by flogging this dead horse at every election and expecting punters to buy it and them seriously.
Travelling Hooker
Bang on. Cue the gravy train.
Lots of critical analysis posted here. If the majority of people on a rail based forum, agree that HSR in this context is a folly, then Albo should read and take heed.
It ain’t the political silver bullet for the Hunter, they seek.
  Totoro Junior Train Controller

It’s funny, I’m not a Labor supporter at all, but I’ve always been favourable to the idea of HSR and do like that Albo remains so devoted to it. I only wish the LNP were half as enthusiastic about HSR, they’d probably have a MUCH better chance of getting it off the ground.
  KRviator Moderator

Location: Up the front
As I said to a mate on FB who posted the story - that $500M wouldn't even cover the cost of the Cowan Bank deviation yet alone the rest of it. The money would be better spent on the freight deviation from Fassifern to Hexham. At least that'll get rid of most of the freighters from the level crossings in town.
  michaelgm Chief Commissioner

As I said to a mate on FB who posted the story - that $500M wouldn't even cover the cost of the Cowan Bank deviation yet alone the rest of it. The money would be better spent on the freight deviation from Fassifern to Hexham. At least that'll get rid of most of the freighters from the level crossings in town.
KRviator
The political impact of that deviation is negligible. No shiny shovel turning the first sod.
A better use of funds though, IMHO.
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line
would ultimately become a white elephant when your generation retires.


alot of white elephants around sydney the big ones are the toll roads where the operators makes a profit ...not the state ..
viaprojects

A white elephant by its nature does not generate a profit, therefore it's likely an object is only a white elephant in the eyes of the beholder.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_elephant

Mike.
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line
It’s funny, I’m not a Labor supporter at all, but I’ve always been favourable to the idea of HSR and do like that Albo remains so devoted to it. I only wish the LNP were half as enthusiastic about HSR, they’d probably have a MUCH better chance of getting it off the ground.
Totoro

The problem with the LNP is they are not enthusiastic about anything, save trying to remain in office and presumably continuing to support their rich business mates like Gerry Harvey and the prospect of the continuing malaise towards the population in general.

At least Albo is consistent and has always been an enthusiastic supporter of an HSR project particularly as Minister for Infrastructure in the Gillard government and had Labor been returned instead of Abbott being elected, I've no doubt an HSR would be well under construction or completed by now.

To the naysayers...assuming HSR costs say $50 Billion or more if you want to argue that and it was assumed that was too much to pay around 10 years ago, and now we are facing the prospect of a $1 Trillion deficit, is $50 Billion spent over several years too much to pay for an infrastructure project similar in scale to the Snowy Mountains Scheme that will probably employ many hundreds, if not thousands of people who will likely spend their income supporting local industry and further employment, whilst ultimately becoming a carbon emissions friendly transport infrastructure which will reduce the growing, post COVID number of emissions creating flights along its path.

Mike.
  simstrain Chief Commissioner

We should all send emails to Mr Albanese explaining the better solution for rail freight in this country.
  Fatty Deputy Commissioner

Location: Narrabri
It’s funny, I’m not a Labor supporter at all, but I’ve always been favourable to the idea of HSR and do like that Albo remains so devoted to it. I only wish the LNP were half as enthusiastic about HSR, they’d probably have a MUCH better chance of getting it off the ground.

The problem with the LNP is they are not enthusiastic about anything, save trying to remain in office and presumably continuing to support their rich business mates like Gerry Harvey and the prospect of the continuing malaise towards the population in general.

At least Albo is consistent and has always been an enthusiastic supporter of an HSR project particularly as Minister for Infrastructure in the Gillard government and had Labor been returned instead of Abbott being elected, I've no doubt an HSR would be well under construction or completed by now.

To the naysayers...assuming HSR costs say $50 Billion or more if you want to argue that and it was assumed that was too much to pay around 10 years ago, and now we are facing the prospect of a $1 Trillion deficit, is $50 Billion spent over several years too much to pay for an infrastructure project similar in scale to the Snowy Mountains Scheme that will probably employ many hundreds, if not thousands of people who will likely spend their income supporting local industry and further employment, whilst ultimately becoming a carbon emissions friendly transport infrastructure which will reduce the growing, post COVID number of emissions creating flights along its path.

Mike.
The Vinelander
Why wouldn't you do it? It amazes me that people in Australia don't think we deserve a European style rail system. You could do high speed rail that did Brisbane to Sydney in 4 hours I reckon. Depends how much money they're willing to spend to put in infrastructure that should have been started 30 years ago.
  Totoro Junior Train Controller

It’s funny, I’m not a Labor supporter at all, but I’ve always been favourable to the idea of HSR and do like that Albo remains so devoted to it. I only wish the LNP were half as enthusiastic about HSR, they’d probably have a MUCH better chance of getting it off the ground.

The problem with the LNP is they are not enthusiastic about anything, save trying to remain in office
The Vinelander

I agree with most of your points except this one. The most visionary public transport project for Sydney is its 4 Metro lines, and that’s entirely thanks to the LNP and it’s efforts during the last 10 years. The current NSW State government *does* have a plan for fast(er) rail and it’s entirely sensible too.

The big difference between ALP and the LNP is that the LNP is much more likely to get projects funded and built, because they’re willing to de-regulate and engage in public private partnerships where required. We currently have great new trains (the NIFs) sitting in mothballs thanks to the Unions, and sadly ALP has done nothing to reign them in. You can bet that any HSR project would be similarly beholden to the Unions under Labor.

I still do support Albo’s dream in principle, because it is my dream too. I’d just rather see it driven by Scomo and the current NSW government, keep the Unions far away.
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line

The big difference between ALP and the LNP is that the LNP is much more likely to get projects funded and built, because they’re willing to de-regulate and engage in public private partnerships where required. We currently have great new trains (the NIFs) sitting in mothballs thanks to the Unions, and sadly ALP has done nothing to reign them in. You can bet that any HSR project would be similarly beholden to the Unions under Labor.

I still do support Albo’s dream in principle, because it is my dream too. I’d just rather see it driven by Scomo and the current NSW government, keep the Unions far away.
Totoro

We all know how much ScoMo is in favour of low carbon emissions, high speed fixed rail infrastructure. Two words...Badgery's Creek...now that's MY definition of a white elephant as referred to earlier. in the thread...thanks ScoMo.

Had ScoMo actually been interested in HSR or even MSR, he would have funded same, Sydney to Canberra.

Meanwhile in the socialist southern state, where apparently the unions and the government have a good working relationship and get on just fine thanks, Victoria's many jobs creating Big Build, multi-billion dollar transport infrastructure investment.

https://bigbuild.vic.gov.au/

Mike.
  Totoro Junior Train Controller


The big difference between ALP and the LNP is that the LNP is much more likely to get projects funded and built, because they’re willing to de-regulate and engage in public private partnerships where required. We currently have great new trains (the NIFs) sitting in mothballs thanks to the Unions, and sadly ALP has done nothing to reign them in. You can bet that any HSR project would be similarly beholden to the Unions under Labor.

I still do support Albo’s dream in principle, because it is my dream too. I’d just rather see it driven by Scomo and the current NSW government, keep the Unions far away.
We all know how much ScoMo is in favour of low carbon emissions, high speed fixed rail infrastructure. Two words...Badgery's Creek...now that's MY definition of a white elephant as referred to earlier. in the thread...thanks ScoMo.

Had ScoMo actually been interested in HSR or even MSR, he would have funded same, Sydney to Canberra.

Meanwhile in the socialist southern state, where apparently the unions and the government have a good working relationship and get on just fine thanks, Victoria's many jobs creating Big Build, multi-billion dollar transport infrastructure investment.

https://bigbuild.vic.gov.au/

Mike.
The Vinelander

I think it is the current NSW government that has the best plan for faster rail in NSW. They are the only ones I really trust with a project of this magnitude and importance. Sorry, I don’t trust Labor. Not after they cancelled the Parramatta-Epping link, bungled multiple failed iterations of Metro, and then threatened to cancel the various Metro and Light Rail projects that did get off the ground (with quite a good degree of success) under the current government. You can do what you like in Victoria, but in NSW let’s leave it to the experts with a proven track record. All the best! Smile

https://www.nsw.gov.au/a-fast-rail-future-for-nsw
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line

The big difference between ALP and the LNP is that the LNP is much more likely to get projects funded and built, because they’re willing to de-regulate and engage in public private partnerships where required. We currently have great new trains (the NIFs) sitting in mothballs thanks to the Unions, and sadly ALP has done nothing to reign them in. You can bet that any HSR project would be similarly beholden to the Unions under Labor.

I still do support Albo’s dream in principle, because it is my dream too. I’d just rather see it driven by Scomo and the current NSW government, keep the Unions far away.
We all know how much ScoMo is in favour of low carbon emissions, high speed fixed rail infrastructure. Two words...Badgery's Creek...now that's MY definition of a white elephant as referred to earlier. in the thread...thanks ScoMo.

Had ScoMo actually been interested in HSR or even MSR, he would have funded same, Sydney to Canberra.

Meanwhile in the socialist southern state, where apparently the unions and the government have a good working relationship and get on just fine thanks, Victoria's many jobs creating Big Build, multi-billion dollar transport infrastructure investment.

https://bigbuild.vic.gov.au/

Mike.
I think it is the current NSW government that has the best plan for faster rail in NSW. They are the only ones I really trust with a project of this magnitude and importance. Sorry, I don’t trust Labor. Not after they cancelled the Parramatta-Epping link, bungled multiple failed iterations of Metro, and then threatened to cancel the various Metro and Light Rail projects that did get off the ground (with quite a good degree of success) under the current government. You can do what you like in Victoria, but in NSW let’s leave it to the experts with a proven track record. All the best! Smile

https://www.nsw.gov.au/a-fast-rail-future-for-nsw
Totoro

You are of course entitled to your opinion, but with prudish religious nut Dom at the helm of NSW, I wish YOU all the best under his socially regressive regime.

Thanks for the link, however a 20 year timeline sees many if not all NSW parliamentarians long retired or dead with nobody remaining to accept responsibility for such LONG term planning. Lots of motherhood statements, but not much else there Totoro. At least in Victoria our stuff is happening now.

Albo's HSR plan will be underway soon after he is elected and of that prospect I'm quite confident.

Mike.
  Transtopic Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney

I think it is the current NSW government that has the best plan for faster rail in NSW. They are the only ones I really trust with a project of this magnitude and importance. Sorry, I don’t trust Labor. Not after they cancelled the Parramatta-Epping link, bungled multiple failed iterations of Metro, and then threatened to cancel the various Metro and Light Rail projects that did get off the ground (with quite a good degree of success) under the current government. You can do what you like in Victoria, but in NSW let’s leave it to the experts with a proven track record. All the best! Smile

https://www.nsw.gov.au/a-fast-rail-future-for-nsw
Totoro
I will agree with you that the approach of the NSW Government for faster rail, as shown in the link, is the way to go as a first stage of a broader upgrade of the rail network to the Queensland and Victorian borders. It also includes the Western and South Coast Lines and not just cities and towns on the Brisbane-Sydney-Melbourne North-South axis.  The primary focus should be on improved connectivity between the Capital cities and their respective regional centres and not between Capital cities, which is a secondary consideration, although those journey times will be significantly improved over time as incremental upgrades are completed.

Even Albo's proposed HSR plan seems to imply this in stating the interim benefits for upgrading to Medium Speed Rail standard, with longer term upgrading to HSR, although I think he's being a bit optimistic in the time-line.

Putting aside your political bias, the NSW Government hasn't exactly been exemplary in progressing its faster rail program.  The report prepared by Professor Andrew McNaughton was completed some time ago and hasn't yet seen the light of day.  There is no funding commitment and the project appears to have dropped off the radar.  So much for your infallible LNP.  It seems that their obsession with spending billions on its metro program hasn't left much over for anything else.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese has used a speech in Newcastle to dangle the prospect of fast rail to voters ahead of the upcoming federal election.

Mr Albanese addressed a gathering of around 100 Labor Party members at Cooks Hill Surf Club this morning.

He said a Labor government would "prioritise" fast rail between Sydney and Newcastle as a first step towards high-speed rail.

"If I'm elected prime minister, I want ours to be the first government that actually gets work underway on high-speed rail," he said.
"My vision is for high-speed rail that runs from Brisbane to Melbourne.

"Under a Labor government I lead, the High-Speed Rail Authority will make the corridor from Newcastle to Sydney, which includes stops at the Central Coast, its first priority.



Mr Albanese toured Hamilton Railway Station during his visit.(ABC Newcastle: Liz Farquhar)"We'll start with a fast-rail corridor but we'll plan and build for the move to high-speed rail.

"Faster rail would see travel times from Newcastle to Sydney cut to just two hours, and once high-speed rail is up and running, this journey would only take 45 minutes."

Mr Albanese promised that Labor would set aside $500 million in its first budget to begin corridor acquisition, planning and early works for fast rail.
  Carnot Minister for Railways

"Faster rail" in just under 2 hours.

Current record holder 3801 will do the trick...


https://youtu.be/VdLh1P8tky8

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