TGR A1 proposed design

 
  LoganJ03 Beginner

Hi all,

I'm looking for any information available regarding this curious 4-2-2 design that I found while looking through locomotive drawings in the Libraries Tas archives. I assume this would have been an express locomotive in the vein of the UK's venerable
4-2-2 Stirling Single locomotives. This is the only drawing I could find but I would like to locate more details if possible.

The drawing mentioned can be found here under the name "A1 16" https://stors.tas.gov.au/P2316-1-23$init=P2316-1-23_033

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  Peter-Hem Locomotive Driver

Location: Tassie
If you can have a read of "Tasmanian Railways 125 Years (A Pictorial History)". It's full of great information.

Tasmanian Government Railways A Class number 1 was a unique build, different from the other locomotives of its class: A2 - A9.
The locomotive was originally Launceston & Western Railway locomotive number 5.
It was built in 1873 by Sharp Stewart & co. in Manchester, as a broad gauge (5 ft 3 in) 2-4-0 tank engine.
In 1891 the T.G.R rebuilt the locomotive to a narrow gauge (3 ft 6 in) 4-2-2 tender locomotive.
  LoganJ03 Beginner

If you can have a read of "Tasmanian Railways 125 Years (A Pictorial History)". It's full of great information.

Tasmanian Government Railways A Class number 1 was a unique build, different from the other locomotives of its class: A2 - A9.
The locomotive was originally Launceston & Western Railway locomotive number 5.
It was built in 1873 by Sharp Stewart & co. in Manchester, as a broad gauge (5 ft 3 in) 2-4-0 tank engine.
In 1891 the T.G.R rebuilt the locomotive to a narrow gauge (3 ft 6 in) 4-2-2 tender locomotive.
Peter-Hem
Are there any known photographs of this locomotive? Also, would this be one of, if not the only, 4-2-2 locomotive to operate in Australia?
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

According to Ken Milbourne's "Steam Locomotives of Tasmania" the conversion extended over a protracted period, not completed until 1891 (18 years after the loco was built) and it proved a failure. Stood out of service at Launceston for many years beforfe being scrapped in 1914. Probably not a lot of interest for photographers in a loco which was a failure.
  hbedriver Assistant Commissioner

Building a single powered axle steam loco? For a railway known to enjoy fog, mist, sea spray, rain, snow? With tight curves abounding, limiting maximum speeds?

Why?

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